Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Scientists, Foundations, Libraries, Universities, and Advocates Unite and Issue New Recommendations to Make Research Freely Available to All Online

 

Those of you who follow my blog know this is one of my passions!

From the press release

September 12, 2012   Information Program

Scientists, Foundations, Libraries, Universities, and Advocates Unite and Issue New Recommendations to Make Research Freely Available to All Online

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 12, 2012

CONTACT: Andrea Higginbotham, SPARC, andrea@arl.org; 202-296-2296

Amy Weil, Open Society Foundations, aweil@sorosny.org; 212-548-0381

WASHINGTON—In response to the growing demand to make research free and available to anyone with a computer and an internet connection, a diverse coalition today issued new recommendations that could usher in huge advances in the sciences, medicine, and health.

The recommendations were developed by leaders of the Open Access movement, which has worked for the past decade to provide the public with unrestricted, free access to scholarly research—much of which is publicly funded. Making the research publicly available to everyone—free of charge and without most copyright and licensing restrictions—will accelerate scientific research efforts and allow authors to reach a larger number of readers…

 

September 17, 2012 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Impact of free access to the scientific literature, including empowerment of health care consumers

From the 21 July 2011 blog item at  Science Intelligence and InfoPros, by hbasset

An excellent review in the latest JMLA:

The paper reviews recent studies that evaluate the impact of free access (open access) on the behavior of scientists as authors, readers, and citers in developed and developing nations. (…)

  • Researchers report that their access to the scientific literature is generally good and improving (76% of researchers think that it is better now than 5 years ago)
  • Publishers (Elsevier and Oxford UP) reveal an increase in the number of journals available at a typical university and an even larger increase in the article downloads
  • For authors, the access status of a journal is not an important consideration when deciding where to publish (journal reputation is stronger)
  • The high cost of Western scientific journals poses a major barrier to researchers in developing nations
  • There is clear evidence that free access increases the number of article downloads, although its impact on article citations is not clear
  • Recent studies provide little evidence to support the idea that there is a crisis in access to the scholarly literature
  • Author’s resistance to publication fees is a major barrier to greater participation in open access initiatives
  • The empowerment of health care consumers through universal access to original research has ben cited as a key benefit of free access to the scientific literature
  • overall, the published evidence does not indicate how (or whether) free access to the scientific literature influences consumers’ reading or behavior
  • current research reveals no evidence of unmet demand for the primary medical or health sciences literature among the general public
  • most research on access to the scientific literature assumes a traditional and hierarchical flow of information from the publisher to the eader, with the library often serving ans an intermediary betwwen the two. Very little has been done to investigate alternative routes of access to the scientific literature

Davis, Philip M. & Walters, William H. The impact of free access to the scientific literature: a review of recent research. J Med Libr Assoc 99(3):208-17 (2011).
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21753913

available at:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133904/

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July 26, 2011 Posted by | Health Education (General Public), Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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