Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Tips for a Chemical free summer (part 2)

Originally posted on Dr. Ibby Omole ND:

I would hope that after reading my first blog, some of you would have rushed out to replace your Hawaiian Tropic sunscreen with something that is a little bit better for your health.

Pesticides are a significant source of toxicity. People are exposed to pesticides via food and the environment in particular lawn care. While research is usually focused on massive pesticide exposure, low dose long-term pesticide exposure is difficult to capture. Not to mention the fact that pesticide residue has been linked to everything from hypospadias to decreased intelligence, learning and memory in children. Children are particularly vulnerable because of their immature organs, rapidly dividing and migrating cells, higher metabolic rate and smaller size.

Ways to decrease pesticide exposure.

1. Eat locally and organically. Summer is the perfect season to do this. Farmer’s markets are filled with everything from organic produce to baked goods and plants. Summer is also…

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July 14, 2013 Posted by | Consumer Health, environmental health | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Prenatal exposure to some pesticides can lead to lower IQs

From a May 20 Blog Upstream item by Elizabeth Grossman

New York City’s low-income neighborhoods and California’s Salinas Valley, where 80 percent of the United States’ lettuce is grown, could hardly be more different. But scientists have discovered that children growing up in these communities — one characterized by the rattle of subway trains, the other by acres of produce and vast sunny skies — share a pre-natal exposure to pesticides that appears to be affecting their ability to learn and succeed in school.

Three studies undertaken independently, but published simultaneously last month, show that prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides — sprayed on crops in the Salinas Valley and used in Harlem and the South Bronx to control cockroaches and other insects — can lower children’s IQ by an average of as much as 7 points. While this may not sound like a lot, it is more than enough to affect a child’s reading and math skills and cause behavioral problems with potentially long-lasting impacts, according to the studies.

“This is not trivial,” said Virginia Rauh, one of the study authors, speaking from Columbia University, where she is deputy director of the university’s Center for Children’s Environmental Health and professor of population and family health. What is particularly significant, she said, is that these studies involved so many children from such different communities, yet produced consistent evidence of the pesticides’ effects on cognitive skills and short-term memory

July 5, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Legally poisoned

Legally poisoned

UC Riverside professor outlines risks of daily exposure to toxicants and advocates regulatory changes to protect public health

From a January 24, 2011 Eureka news alert

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Americans are exposed to hundreds, if not thousands, of suspected toxic substances every day, substances that affect the development and function of the brain, immune system, reproductive organs or hormones. Children are the most vulnerable. But no public health law requires product testing of most chemical compounds before they enter the marketplace.

That must change, UC Riverside professor Carl Cranor argues in a new book, “Legally Poisoned: How the Law Puts Us at Risk from Toxicants” (Harvard University Press, 2011).

The current harm-based or risk-of-harm-based legal structure for regulating exposure to toxic substances is problematic, says Cranor, a professor of philosophy and longtime advocate of reforming U.S. regulatory policies. “Because most substances are subject to post-market regulation, the existing legal structure results in involuntary experiments on citizens. The bodies of the citizenry are invaded and trespassed on by commercial substances, arguably a moral wrong.”

Scientists are finding that every industrial chemical and pesticide produced today is capable of entering our bodies, says Cranor, who has served on science advisory panels for the state of California and on Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences committees. For three decades he has studied U.S. regulatory policy and philosophic issues concerning risks, science and the law, as well as the regulation of carcinogens and developmental toxicants, and protection of susceptible populations from new and existing technologies and toxicants. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and University of California Toxic Substances Research and Teaching Program.

Cranor notes that the Centers for Disease Control has identified more than 200 toxicants in the bodies of average Americans, a number that he contends is low only because the CDC has not yet developed protocols to reliably identify other substances.  [See  National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals]

“The list is only going to grow over time,” Cranor says.

With the exception of pharmaceuticals and pesticides, the U.S. legal system permits most substances to come in without testing for toxicity, without knowing whether they cause cancer, birth defects, developmental effects, or reproductive effects. Only about 2 percent of 62,000 substances in commerce before 1979 have been reviewed at all for their toxicity by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, he says. Of the approximately 50,000 substances introduced since 1979, about 85 percent were allowed to market with no data concerning health effects.

Industrial, often toxic, chemicals are everywhere – bisphenol A used in plastic bottles and that lines cans of food; non-stick cooking surfaces or Gore-Tex material that contains perfluorinated compounds; curtains, baby car seats and TV sets manufactured with brominated flame-retardants; and countless cosmetic ingredients, industrial chemicals, pesticides, and other compounds, all of which enter our bodies and remain briefly or for years.

Chemical contamination is so prevalent, Cranor says, “that it will make future human studies more difficult; there will be no clean controls against which to compare people who are contaminated. We are all contaminated. It’s a question of more or less contamination. So it’s going to be increasingly difficult for the science to detect some of these effects in humans, when they exist.”

The legal process for identifying adverse health effects and removing the responsible substances from the marketplace is extremely slow, he says.

“The only way to reduce toxic contamination is to require testing of products before they come in to commerce,” he says. “If they appear to pose adverse health effects, they should not be permitted, or they should be required to be reformulated so the problems disappear.”

Related Resources

US Centers for Disease Control (especially headings under Environmental Health – Toxic Substances and Your Environment)

US Environmental Protection Agency (especially Learn the Issues)

US National Library of Medicine / US National Institutes of Health Resources, esp

**Toxnet - databases on toxicology, hazardous substances, and environmental health

**ToxTown – Interactive guide to toxic chemicals and environmental health risks. Also in Spanish (ToxTown en español).

January 27, 2011 Posted by | Public Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Working With Pesticides May Affect Memory and More

From a December 2, 2010 Health Day news item by Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) — Being exposed to pesticides over a long period of time might be linked to dementia, a new study of agricultural workers suggests.

The research effort included 614 vineyard workers in France who were in their 40s and 50s and had worked for at least 20 years in the agricultural sector. Their intellectual abilities were assessed twice, using nine tests designed to measure memory and recall, language retrieval, verbal skills and reaction time.

The workers’ exposure to pesticides during the six-year span of the study varied. About 20 percent were never exposed to pesticides and more than half had been directly exposed, which included mixing or applying pesticides and cleaning or repairing spraying equipment. The rest had either been indirectly exposed by coming into contact with treated plants or possibly indirectly exposed through their work in buildings, offices, cellars and the like.

On seven of the nine tests, workers who had been exposed to pesticides were most likely to do worse the second time they were tested, the researchers found. The study also reported that pesticide-exposed workers were up to five times more likely than the others to have lower test scores on both occasions and were twice as likely to show a drop of two points in the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), which tests cognitive functioning and is frequently used to determine if a person has dementia.

The decline in MMSE score “is particularly striking in view of the short duration of follow-up and the relatively young age of the participants,” Isabelle Baldi, of the Institute de Sante Publique d’Epidemiologie et de Developpement in Bordeaux, France, and colleagues wrote in the report published in the Dec. 2 online edition of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“The mild [cognitive] impairment we observed raises the question of the potentially higher risks of injury in this population and also of possible evolution towards neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias,” the study authors added.

December 3, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items | , , , | Leave a comment

Plant-derived scavengers prowl the body for nerve toxins

 

Tsafrir Mor is a researcher at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University.

From the November 23, 2010 Eureka news alert

 

The brain is forever chattering to itself, via electrical impulses sent along its hard-wired neuronal “Ethernet.” These e-messages are translated into chemical transmissions, allowing communication across the narrow cleft separating one neuron from another or between neurons and their target cells. Of the many kinds of molecules involved in this lively chemical symposium, acetylcholine is among the most critical, performing a host of functions in the central and peripheral nervous system. This delicate cholinergic design however is highly vulnerable. It can fall victim to inadvertent or deliberate poisoning by a class of compounds known as organophosphates—chemicals found in a range of pesticides as well as weaponized nerve agents.

Now Tsafrir Mor, a biochemist in the Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University has shown that human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), a so-called bioscavenging molecule, can be produced synthetically—from plants. Further, Mor and his colleagues have demonstrated the effectiveness of plant-derived BChE in protecting against both pesticide and nerve agent organophosphate poisoning.

The group’s research, recently reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), shows promise not only for protecting the nervous system from the effects of organophosphates, but also for gaining a firmer understanding of acetylcholine-linked diseases such as Alzheimer’s Dementia and possibly for use against drug overdose and addiction, particularly cocaine. PNAS has selected the important paper as an Editor’s Choice…

Transgenic tobacco plant is used to produced human butyrylcholinesterase — a bioscavenger that helps clear acetylcholine from the nervous system.

 

….

This work was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health CounterACT Program through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke under a consortium grant awarded to US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense and contracted to Dr. Mor under a research cooperative agreement. It is a continuation of earlier work originally under support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

In addition to Dr. Mor’s appointment with the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University he is a professor in the School of Life Sciences.

*Geyer BC, *Kannan L, *Garnaud PE, Broomfield CA, Cadieux CL, *Cherni I, Hodgins SM, Kasten SA, *Kelley K, *Kilbourne J, Oliver ZP, Otto TC, *Puffenberger I, Reeves TE, *Robbins N, 2nd, *Woods RR, Soreq H, Lenz DE, Cerasoli DM, *Mor TS (2010) Plant-derived human butyrylcholinesterase, but not an organophosphorous-compound hydrolyzing variant thereof, protects rodents against nerve agents. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, in press (available online at http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2010/11/05/1009021107) .

 

 

 

November 24, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items | , , , , | Leave a comment

More Bedbug Information Sites

New stories about bedbug infestations are on the rise.
The good news is an increasing number of sources of great usable information, including the appropriate use of pesticides.

Some links from Enviro-Health Links – Pesticide Exposure (National Library of Medicine)

Top Ten Bed Bug Tips (US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA])
Preventing and Getting Rid of Bed Bugs Safely (PDF, 2 MB)
Understanding and Controlling Bed Bugs (National Pesticide Information Center)

More Enviro-Health Links may be found here.
Topics include Children’s Environmental Health, Climate Change and Human Health, and Dietary Supplements.

 

September 21, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

Organization Strives to Eliminate Misuse of Pesticides.


Beyond Pesticides is a nonprofit organization provides information on pesticides and alternatives to their use.
The current home page features a video on how to control bedbugs without toxic pesticides.
Current alerts and actions include:
**Pesticide-Induced Disease Database with links to select scientific articles correlating a growing number of diseases with pesticides in the environment
**The Safer Choice with links to information on pesticide alternatives
**Organic Food: Eating with a Conscience which “urges consumers to consider impacts on environment and rural families and farm workers, in addition to pesticide residues, when making food choices”

September 8, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

Bedbug Information from MedlinePlus

Some of the tips below were new to me, as checking secondhand furniture.
On a related note, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) describe emerging public health issues associated with bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) in communities throughout the United States.

Bedbugs feed on your blood and cause itchy bites. Adult bed bugs are brown, 1/4 to 3/8 long, and have a flat, oval-shaped body. Young bed bugs (called nymphs) are smaller and lighter in color. Bedbugs hide in a variety of places around the bed. They might also hide in other places, such as in the seams of chairs and couches, between cushions, and in the folds of curtains. They come out to feed on blood about every five to ten days. But they can survive over a year without feeding.

To prevent bedbugs in your home:

  • Check secondhand furniture for any signs of bedbugs before bringing it home.
  • Use a protective cover that encases mattresses and box springs. Check it regularly for holes.
  • Reduce clutter in your home so they have fewer places to hide.
  • Unpack directly into your washing machine after a trip and check your luggage carefully.
  •  When staying in hotels, put your suitcases on luggage racks instead of the floor. Check the mattress and headboard for signs of bedbugs.

To get rid of bedbugs:

    • Wash and dry bedding and clothing at high temperatures.
    • Use mattress, box spring, and pillow encasements to trap bed bugs and help detect infestations.
    • Use pesticides if needed.

The good news? Unlike some other pests, bedbugs don’t transmit and spread diseases.

[US Environmental Protection Agency]

———————————–

(October 7th addition)

A New Online Database from the EPA [US Environmental Protection Agency] : The Bed Bug Product Search Tool (Approved Pesticides)

EPA has developed a search tool that can help you choose an EPA-registered bed bug product that meets your needs. You can search for a product by its:

  • Name
  • Company
  • EPA-registration number
  • Where you can use the pesticide
  • Pesticide type

The BedBug Search Tool allows one to search by area of the house (as bedroom) and options as type of product.


September 8, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

   

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