Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2009

Some sobering statistics from a recent Morbidity and Mortality report,  Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance  (US, 2009)

“Results from the 2009 national YRBS indicated that many high school students are engaged in behaviors that increase their likelihood for the leading causes of death among persons aged 10–24 years in the United States. Among high school students nationwide, 9.7% rarely or never wore a seat belt when riding in a car driven by someone else. During the 30 days before the survey, 28.3% of high school students rode in a car or other vehicle driven by someone who had been drinking alcohol, 17.5% had carried a weapon, 41.8% had drunk alcohol, and 20.8% had used marijuana. During the 12 months before the survey, 31.5% of high school students had been in a physical fight and 6.3% had attempted suicide. Substantial morbidity and social problems among youth also result from unintended pregnancies and STDs, including HIV infection. Among high school students nationwide, 34.2% were currently sexually active, 38.9% of currently sexually active students had not used a condom during their last sexual intercourse, and 2.1% of students had ever injected an illegal drug. Results from the 2009 YRBS also indicated that many high school students are engaged in behaviors associated with the leading causes of death among adults aged ≥25 years in the United States. During 2009, 19.5% of high school students smoked cigarettes during the 30 days before the survey. During the 7 days before the survey, 77.7% of high school students had not eaten fruits and vegetables five or more times per day, 29.2% had drunk soda or pop at least one time per day, and 81.6% were not physically active for at least 60 minutes per day on all 7 days. One-third of high school students attended physical education classes daily, and 12.0% were obese.”

June 8, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items | , | Leave a comment

Poll Reveals Sleep Differences among Ethnic Groups

The 2010 Sleep in America poll released today by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) reveals significant differences in the sleep habits and attitudes of Asians, Blacks/African-Americans, Hispanics and Whites. It is the first poll to examine sleep among these four ethnic groups.

Highlights

  •  More than three-fourths of respondents from each ethnic group agree that poor sleep is associated with health problems (76-83%)
  • All groups report disturbingly similar experiences missing work or family functions because they were too sleepy (19-24%)
  • Blacks/African-Americans spend much more time in bed without sleeping than the other ethnic groups (54 minutes on weekdays/workdays and 71 minutes on non-workdays/weekends)
  • Asians report getting the best sleep, report the least amount of sleep problems and infrequent use of sleep aids
  • Hispanics are the most likely to say they are kept awake by financial, employment, personal relationship and/or health-related concerns

 

A summary of the report may be found here.

June 8, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health | | Leave a comment

   

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