Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Booze Tax Hikes May Reduce Alcohol-Related Problems

Higher costs have even greater impact than drinking prevention programs, analysis finds

Excerpts from the Health Day news item

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) — Boosting taxes on alcohol leads to lower rates of alcohol-related disease, injury, death and crime, researchers say.

University of Florida investigators analyzed 50 published papers that estimated the health and social effects of alcohol taxes or prices. The study authors concluded that higher alcohol taxes have a greater impact than drinking prevention programs.

The findings “clearly show increasing the price of alcohol will result in significant reductions in many of the undesirable outcomes associated with drinking,” lead author Alexander C. Wagenaar, a professor of health outcomes and policy at the University of Florida College of Medicine, said in a news release from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

In a news release issued Thursday afternoon, Distilled Spirits Council Vice President Lisa Hawkins said: “Numerous studies, including research from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, show that alcohol abusers are the least sensitive to tax increases. It is the moderate responsible consumer who cuts back the most when prices rise.

“According to scientific studies, moderate alcohol consumption is associated with the lowest all-cause mortality compared to non-drinkers. It makes no sense to penalize moderate drinkers to pay for the abuse of a few, particularly when raising taxes will not reduce problems associated with abuse. For example, according to government statistics, there is no relationship between alcohol excise tax rates and alcohol-related traffic fatalities,” she said.

September 26, 2010 - Posted by | Health News Items | ,

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