Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Americans’ Salt Intake Unchanged Over 50 Years

Intense efforts to limit sodium in U.S. diet aren’t working, an expert says

From an October 20, 2010 Health Day news item

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) — Americans still consume more salt than they should, despite decades of warnings linking high-salt diets with an increase in blood pressure and a higher risk of heart disease and stroke.

A new Harvard study finds salt intake is about the same today as it was nearly 50 years ago, an amount well above recommended guidelines, noted Dr. Adam M. Bernstein, the study’s lead author.

Bernstein, a research fellow in the Harvard School of Public Health’s department of nutrition, and colleague Dr. Walter C. Willett analyzed 38 studies, published between 1957 and 2003, that reported the amount of salt that the more than 26,000 participants passed in their urine. This test is the most reliable estimate of salt intake.

The researchers thought they would find that salt intake had increased over time because Americans eat more processed foods today than in 1957. But decade after decade, people consistently consumed about 3,700 milligrams of sodium a day, the data showed. Current sodium guidelines advise up to 2,300 milligrams (about one teaspoon) a day for adults, and 1,500 milligrams for those who have or are at risk for high blood pressure.

The study appears in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

[Editor Flahiff’s note…Ask a reference librarian at a local public, academic, or medical library for the availability of the full text of this article…either at or through the library. The library may charge a fee. It’s always best to call ahead for information!]

 

 

 

Advertisements

October 23, 2010 - Posted by | Consumer Health

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: