Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

10 of the Top Health Apps for Consumers & Professionals in 2010

From the ePharma Summit blog item

A lot has changed over the course of 2010 in the apps that HCP’s and Patients use to divulge health information. Many are continuing to get on the Mobile “Bandwagon” for the first time this year alone thanks to innovations in Smartphones and new portable tablets.

Here are 10 popular apps you should consider:

1. Medscape Medscape tops our list as the number one free medical app for medical professionals. The amount of free content provided by Medscape is absolutely mind boggling and seems to continuously grow with each update. 7,000+ drug references, 3,500+ disease clinical references, 2,500+ clinical images and procedure videos, robust drug interaction tool checker, CME activities, and more.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/05/medscape-iphone-medical-app-review

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/medscape/id321367289?mt=8

2. Micromedex This might come as a surprise to many, but after you use this prescription medical reference app you’ll understand why it ranks so high. The overall user interface of the app is simple and quick. There is minimal clutter — another reason for such a high ranking. If you need to look up a dose or some quick reference information about a drug you can accomplish this with ease.

There are no prompts to register your e-mail address, no CME activities, no icon badges, no notifications, or any other distractions. The one knock on this app is it doesn’t have a robust drug interaction checker, something Medscape and Epocrates provide. On the flip side, for residents and medical students, the app does a better job than other drug reference apps when it comes to mechanism of action information and patient teaching information. Another plus is it’s available for the iPad — which is not true of Epocrates and Medscape.

The application is a production of Thomson Reuters, a legitimate name in Healthcare.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/micromedex-drug-information/id390211464?mt=8

3. New England Journal of Medicine The NEJM app is clearly a must have for all health care professionals. The caveat is that when this app was released the NEJM stated it would be free for a “limited time” in the iTunes description — that was more than 5 months ago and the app still remains free, allowing you to access fantastic NEJM content customized for the mobile format. The app allows you to access the last 7 days worth of published articles, along with images of various medical conditions and videos on how to perform procedures such as LPs and chest tubes.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/06/new-england-journal-of-medicine-iphone-app-free-content/

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nejm-this-week/id373156254?mt=8

4. Epocrates There is no denying Epocrates is one of the best medical reference tools in the mobile format. The free version of Epocrates, Epocrates Rx, provides great content: Drug monographs and health plan formularies, drug interaction tool, pill identifier, medical Calculator, and a new addition: Medical News and handpicked clinical articles.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/02/epocrates-app-review-iphone-medical-app-ipod-touc/

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/epocrates/id281935788?mt=8

5. MedCalc MedCalc once again makes it into our top free medical apps list. The creators of MedCalc have updated the app multiple times, making its user interface more robust and continuously adding medical formulas. It’s been downloaded more than a mind numbing 700,000 times, making it one of the most popular medical apps for the iPhone. The creators of the app are medical professionals and it was one of the first medical calculators to hit the iOS App Store with the introduction of the iPhone.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2009/06/medcalc-v12/

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/medcalc-medical-calculator/id299470331?mt=8

6. WebMD Mobile This is a free app, which helps patients to diagnose their condition, using a symptom checker. You simply enter your symptoms and the app gives you a diagnosis. There is also a first aid section, which covers everything from minor cuts to heart attacks. The app also offers information about suitable treatments

http://www.webmd.com/mobile

7) iPregnancy This is a useful application for pregnant women; it has a range of pictures of the developing baby and contains a wealth of information about pregnancy. The app also has a tool to keep track of antenatal appointments.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ipregnancy-pregnancy-app/id295598816?mt=8

8) Blood pressure This app tracks blood pressure and can be used to keep a record of blood pressure over a set time period. The app can be utilized by multiple users and is easy to use. This app is ideal for those who have high blood pressure but can be beneficial for everyone, as there are often no obvious symptoms of high blood pressure.

http://www.apple.com/webapps/calculate/bloodpressure.html

9) Glucose Buddy

The Glucose Buddy app is a really useful tool for diabetics; it helps to keep track of blood sugar levels.

http://www.glucosebuddy.com/glucose_buddy_app

10) iPharmacy

iPharmacy enables you to look up medications and treatments and look for dosage instructions, side-effects and information about different drugs. The app also has information about drug interactions so you can find out about taking medications with other types of drug.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ipharmacy-the-drug-medication/id348702163?mt=8

Doctors are taking to iPhone, BlackBerry and smartphone apps. According to the 2009 MDsearch.com Smartphone Survey, 53% of physician respondents own a smartphone and 63% of those physicians are using mobile medical applications. Like it or not apps are here to stay. I truly think they will help 98% of the time both as a reference or a quick way to get updated information about any topic.

December 28, 2010 - Posted by | Consumer Health, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | ,

2 Comments »

  1. You should have included Lexicomp… its by far superior to Micromedex.

    Comment by John | December 29, 2010 | Reply

    • Thank you John.
      I do not have the expertise to evaluate apps, this is just a reposting from what I thought was a reputable source.

      Could you tell me a bit about how you use Lexicomp, and how it is superior to Micromedex?
      And with your permission, add this to my posting??
      I think many people would be interested.

      Again, thank you John for reading and responding to the post.

      Much appreciated!

      Janice

      Comment by Janice Flahiff | December 30, 2010 | Reply


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