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Neurobiologists find that weak electrical fields in the brain help neurons fire together

Neurobiologists find that weak electrical fields in the brain help neurons fire together
Coordinated behavior occurs whether or not neurons are actually connected via synapses

From a February 2, 2011 Eureka News Alert

Ephaptic coupling leads to coordinated spiking of nearby neurons, as measured using a 12-pipette electrophysiology setup developed in the laboratory of coauthor Henry Markram.

 

Pasadena, Calif.—The brain—awake and sleeping—is awash in electrical activity, and not just from the individual pings of single neurons communicating with each other. In fact, the brain is enveloped in countless overlapping electric fields, generated by the neural circuits of scores of communicating neurons. The fields were once thought to be an “epiphenomenon, a ‘bug’ of sorts, occurring during neural communication,” says neuroscientist Costas Anastassiou, a postdoctoral scholar in biology at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

New work by Anastassiou and his colleagues, however, suggests that the fields do much more—and that they may, in fact, represent an additional form of neural communication.

“In other words,” says Anastassiou, the lead author of a paper about the work appearing in the journal Nature Neuroscience,** “while active neurons give rise to extracellular fields, the same fields feed back to the neurons and alter their behavior,” even though the neurons are not physically connected—a phenomenon known as ephaptic coupling. “So far, neural communication has been thought to occur at localized machines, termed synapses. Our work suggests an additional means of neural communication through the extracellular space independent of synapses.”

Extracellular electric fields exist throughout the living brain, though they are particularly strong and robustly repetitive in specific brain regions such as the hippocampus, which is involved in memory formation, and the neocortex, the area where long-term memories are held. “The perpetual fluctuations of these extracellular fields are the hallmark of the living and behaving brain in all organisms, and their absence is a strong indicator of a deeply comatose, or even dead, brain,” Anastassiou explains……

…..

What does that mean for brain computation? “Neuroscientists have long speculated about this,” Anastassiou says. “Increased spike-field coherency may substantially enhance the amount of information transmitted between neurons as well as increase its reliability. Moreover, it has been long known that brain activity patterns related to memory and navigation give rise to a robust LFP and enhanced spike-field coherency. We believe ephaptic coupling does not have one major effect, but instead contributes on many levels during intense brain processing.”

Can external electric fields have similar effects on the brain? “This is an interesting question,” Anastassiou says. “Indeed, physics dictates that any external field will impact the neural membrane. Importantly, though, the effect of externally imposed fields will also depend on the brain state. One could think of the brain as a distributed computer—not all brain areas show the same level of activation at all times……

 

**For suggestions on how to get this article for free or at low cost, click here

 

February 3, 2011 - Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , ,

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