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General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Researchers working toward automating sedation in intensive care units

Researchers working toward automating sedation in intensive care units

Georgia Institute of Technology Research News) Researchers are one step closer to their goal of automating the management of sedation in hospital intensive care units. They have developed control algorithms that use clinical data to accurately determine a patient’s level of sedation and can notify medical staff if there is a change in the level.

 

 

From the February 15, 2011 Eureka news alert

Computer system for evaluating sedation level shows strong agreement with clinical assessment
IMAGE: Georgia Tech researchers Wassim Haddad, Allen Tannenbaum and Behnood Gholami (left-right) and Northeast Georgia Medical Center chief medical informatics officer James Bailey have developed control algorithms to automate sedation in…

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Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Northeast Georgia Medical Center are one step closer to their goal of automating the management of sedation in hospital intensive care units (ICUs). They have developed control algorithms that use clinical data to accurately determine a patient’s level of sedation and can notify medical staff if there is a change in the level.

“ICU nurses have one of the most task-laden jobs in medicine and typically take care of multiple patients at the same time, so if we can use control system technology to automate the task of sedation, patient safety will be enhanced and drug delivery will improve in the ICU,” said James Bailey, the chief medical informatics officer at the Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville, Ga. Bailey is also a certified anesthesiologist and intensive care specialist.

During a presentation at the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, the researchers reported on their analysis of more than 15,000 clinical measurements from 366 ICU patients they classified as “agitated” or “not agitated.” Agitation is a measure of the level of patient sedation. The algorithm returned the same results as the assessment by hospital staff 92 percent of the time.

“Manual sedation control can be tedious, imprecise, time-consuming and sometimes of poor quality, depending on the skills and judgment of the ICU nurse,” said Wassim Haddad, a professor in the Georgia Tech School of Aerospace Engineering. “Ultimately, we envision an automated system in which the ICU nurse evaluates the ICU patient, enters the patient’s sedation level into a controller, which then adjusts the sedative dosing regimen to maintain sedation at the desired level by continuously collecting and analyzing quantitative clinical data on the patient.”…

IMAGE: Georgia Tech researchers Allen Tannenbaum, Wassim Haddad and Behnood Gholami (left-right) and Northeast Georgia Medical Center chief medical informatics officer James Bailey have developed control algorithms to automate sedation in…

Click here for more information. 

 

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This project is supported in part by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command (Grant No. 08108002). The content is solely the responsibility of the principal investigator (Wassim Haddad) and does not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Army….

 

 

 

 

February 15, 2011 - Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , ,

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