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General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

New robot system to test 10,000 chemicals for toxicity

New robot system to test 10,000 chemicals for toxicity

The Tox21 high-speed robot screening system, located at the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) in Rockville, Md., will test 10,000 different chemicals for potential toxicity, merging existing agency resources (research, funding, and testing tools) to develop ways to more effectively predict how chemicals will affect human health and the environment. (Credit: Courtesy of National Human Genome Research Institute)

 

From the March 11 2011 Science Daily news item

ScienceDaily (Mar. 11, 2011) — Several federal agencies have unveiled a new high-speed robot screening system that will test 10,000 different chemicals for potential toxicity. The system marks the beginning of a new phase of an ongoing collaboration, referred to as Tox21, that is working to protect people’s health by improving how chemicals are tested in this country.

The robot system, which is located at the National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC), was purchased as part of the Tox21 collaboration established in 2008 between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences National Toxicology Program, and NCGC, with the addition of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010. Tox21 merges existing resources — research, funding and testing tools — to develop ways to more effectively predict how chemicals will affect human health and the environment.,,,

 

 

March 14, 2011 Posted by | Public Health | Leave a comment

Grab the leash: Dog walkers more likely to reach exercise benchmarks

Grab the leash: Dog walkers more likely to reach exercise benchmarks

From the March 10 2011 Science Daily news item

ScienceDaily (Mar. 10, 2011) — Man’s best friend may provide more than just faithful companionship: A new study led by a Michigan State University researcher shows people who owned and walked their dogs were 34 percent more likely to meet federal benchmarks on physical activity

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Journal Reference:

  1. Mathew J. Reeves, Ann P. Rafferty, Corinne E. Miller, Sarah K. Lyon-Callo. The Impact of Dog Walking on Leisure-Time Physical Activity: Results From a Population-Based Survey of Michigan AdultsJournal of Physical Activity and Health, 2011; 8 (3): 436-444 [link]

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March 14, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

Keys to long life? Not what you might expect

Keys to long life? Not what you might expect

From a March 12 2011 Science Daily news item

ScienceDaily (Mar. 12, 2011) — Cheer up. Stop worrying. Don’t work so hard. Good advice for a long life? As it turns out, no. In a groundbreaking study of personality as a predictor of longevity, University of California, Riverside researchers found just the opposite….

“We came to a new understanding about happiness and health,” said Martin, now a psychology professor at La Sierra University in Riverside. “One of the findings that really astounds people, including us, is that the Longevity Project participants who were the most cheerful and had the best sense of humor as kids lived shorter lives, on average, than those who were less cheerful and joking. It was the most prudent and persistent individuals who stayed healthiest and lived the longest.”

Part of the explanation lies in health behaviors — the cheerful, happy-go-lucky kids tended to take more risks with their health across the years, Friedman noted. While an optimistic approach can be helpful in a crisis, “we found that as a general life-orientation, too much of a sense that ‘everything will be just fine’ can be dangerous because it can lead one to be careless about things that are important to health and long life. Prudence and persistence, however, led to a lot of important benefits for many years. It turns out that happiness is not a root cause of good health. Instead, happiness and health go together because they have common roots.”…

…Friedman and Leslie R. Martin , a 1996 UCR alumna (Ph.D.) and staff researchers, have published those findings in “The Longevity Project: Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight-Decade Study” (Hudson Street Press, March 2011).

Longevity Project Book Reviews

 

March 14, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

   

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