Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Patchwork Nation (free Web site) has health related statistics

Patchwork Nation (free Web site) has statistics which are health related.
First of all, I am no expert when it comes to statistics. However, I believe public heath benefits much from the collection, analyzing, and use of statistics in programs and policies. So we all will ultimately benefit.
A resource as PatchworkNation (http://www.patchworknation.org) may prove to be of some value. This free Web site provides statistical information by county types (as Monied Burbs, Boom Towns) and District Types (as Established Health and Booming Growth).
I liked Patchwork Nation so much, it was included in a recent letter to the editor (hometown newspaper)…
regarding an editorial cartoon  (http://toledoblade.com/Editorial-Cartoons/2011/03/23/Maumee-Dearest-03-23.html)about a person’s view on the vast amount of money the federal government spends to collect statistics on seemingly inane topics..
Here is an excerpt…
Yet, while many local statistical findings may seem to be a no brainer, they are collectively of great value to planners, researchers, and those involved in networking.
For example, as state money for local governments becomes scarcer, it may be valuable for local government administrators to form partnerships with other local governments. A resource as PatchworkNation***** (http://www.patchworknation.org) may prove to be of some value. This free Web site provides statistical information by county types (as Monied Burbs, Boom Towns) and District Types (as Established Health and Booming Growth).
It is so easy to discount statistics at a local level (the gut reaction “I know that!” in the cartoon). However, when statistics are collected and effectively analyzed at regional and higher levels, they are great tools for planning, and in a great UT phrase they are aiding in  “improving the human condition”.
Please, I am not telling our county administrators where to search for information! They are much more knowledgeable than I in many areas, and I respect them. And I have yet to come across any one statistics source that has all needed information. As a reference librarian, I know first hand how challenging it is to find statistics.
PS The US federal government is the largest collector of statistics in the world. Most of these statistics are available for free on the Internet. For help finding statistics, please do not hesitate to contact a local public or academic librarian. They have Master’s Degrees  in Library Science, and are well versed in how to find information.
You are also welcome to email me (jmflahiff  who “resides” at her yahoo account among other places).

March 28, 2011 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources | Leave a comment

My NCBI Redesign (Personal Search Saving & More Tool for PubMed searches)

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My NCBI Redesign (Personal Search Saving & More Tool for PubMed searches)

From the National Library of Medicine March 15th announcement

The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is pleased to announce that an improved user interface will be released for My NCBI. The new interface will eliminate complexities and provide a streamlined interface, robust performance, and intuitive navigation. The most visually significant enhancement is that all functions are viewed.

[Editor’s note: Sections affected include the home page, saved searches, collections (saved searches that can be run at future dates), and a personlized My Bibliography]

For detailed information about My NCBI, please see My NCBI Help.

March 28, 2011 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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