Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Is the Fact that I Am a Woman Considered a Pre-Existing Condition?

 

By MAGGIE MAHAR at the 8 August post at The Health Care Blog

The male body has long been considered the “standard” for health care coverage. Having a woman’s body is seen as an expensive anomaly, and women pay dearly for being different.

When they buy their own health insurance in the individual market, women must lay out an extra $1 billion a year, simply because they are women. Some argue that this is fair: after all, a woman could become pregnant, and labor and delivery are costly.

But the truth is that, even when maternity benefits are excluded, one-third of all health plans charge women at least 30 percent more, according to a report released just last month by the National Women’s Law Center.

In 36 states, “92 percent of best-selling plans charge 40-year-old women more than 40-year-old men,” the Center reports, and “only 3 percent of these plans cover maternity services … One plan in South Dakota charges a woman $1252.80 more a year than a 40-year-old man for the same coverage.”

Today, less than half of American women can obtain affordable insurance through a job, which explains why millions buy their own insurance in the individual market. In that market, just 14 states ban gender rating:  California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington….

 

Insurers explain that women cost them more, even if policies don’t cover maternity, because “they are more likely to visit doctors, get regular check-ups, take prescription drugs, and have certain chronic illnesses.”

In other words, women are penalized for taking care of themselves, As for those “female chronic ailments,” men also are more vulnerable to certain diseases – including many caused by smoking (23 percent percent smoke vs. 17 percent of women)…

If a woman is raped she, too, risks being shunned. When Christina Turner was attacked by strangers, doctors advised that she take HIV medication “just in case.” Insurers then refused to cover her because the HIV drugs “raise too many health questions.” They told her they would reconsider her in three years if she could prove she did not have AIDS.

Turner went without insurance for three years. Other rape victims report being denied because they suffered from post-traumatic stress syndrome.

These are the most shocking cases. Other rules discriminate against millions of women for a long list of commonplace reasons:

  • If a woman has survived breast cancer, this is a pre-existing condition.
  • If she is pregnant when she applies, this also is considered a pre-existing condition, just like cancer. Most likely, she will be turned down.
  • If she is of child-bearing age and has children, this may well viewed as a pre-existing condition, leading to higher premiums.
  • On the other hand, if she is infertile, this too, can be labeled a pre-existing condition.

Not long ago, House Minority Speaker Nancy Pelosi summed up the hurdles: “If you’re a woman, it’s a pre-existing condition.”

“In most markets if you are a non-smoking female you will pay more than a smoking male of the same age because you possess ovaries and not testes.”..

 

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August 9, 2012 - Posted by | Public Health | , , ,

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