Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Great presentation! complete with graphs (you might need to pause to read them, as I did!)
Language is a bit earthy, but not vulgar
Only negative comment I have…
Speaker said to stay home if you have flu, it is not the end of the world if you do stay home.
Perhaps not, but for those in low paying jobs without paid sick days, it is a very difficult choice to make…the money is needed just for basics as food…

 

Engineer & Entertain

I could not have said it better myself.

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January 25, 2013 Posted by | Public Health | , , | Leave a comment

A blend of soy and dairy proteins promotes muscle protein synthesis when consumed after exercise

From the 24 January 2013 EurkAlert

A blend of proteins supplies amino acids to muscles and extends growth and repair

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 24, 2013 – A new study published in The Journal of Nutrition demonstrates the benefits of consuming a protein blend for muscle protein synthesis after exercise. This study is a first-of-its-kind, conducted by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch, and utilizes the proteins from soy, whey and casein consumed after an acute bout of resistance exercise. These proteins have complementary amino acid profiles and different digestion rates (amino acid release profiles). The results demonstrate prolonged delivery of amino acids to muscles and extended muscle protein synthesis when subjects consumed the blend, compared to a single source of protein alone.

“Sources of high-quality protein contain all the essential amino acids and have individual characteristics thought to offer a unique advantage for muscle growth,” said Blake Rasmussen, Ph.D., interim chair, Department of Nutrition & Metabolism and principal investigator of the study. “This is the first study to test the effects of combining soy with the dairy proteins, whey and casein, for promotion of lean body mass gain.”…

For more information on the study, the following is a link to the study on the Journal of Nutrition site. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/early/recent

Solae™ soy-based ingredient solutions help create nutritious, great-tasting products with a unique combination of functional, nutritional, economical and sustainable benefits. Solae, LLC, originally a DuPont joint venture, was fully acquired by DuPont on May 1, 2012, and is now part of DuPont Nutrition & Health, a world leader in specialty food ingredients. For more information, visitwww.Solae.com, or follow us on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/SolaeLLC, Facebook at www.Facebook.com/SolaeLLC, and LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/company/Solae-LLC.

 

Read the entire article here

 

January 25, 2013 Posted by | Nutrition | , , | Leave a comment

Frontiers publishes systematic review on the effects of yoga on major psychiatric disorders

From the 25 January 2013 EurkAlert

Yoga on our minds: The 5,000-year-old Indian practice may have positive effects on major psychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, ADHD and sleep complaints

Yoga has positive effects on mild depression and sleep complaints, even in the absence of drug treatments, and improves symptoms associated with schizophrenia and ADHD in patients on medication, according to a systematic review of the exercise on major clinical psychiatric disorders.

Published in the open-access journal, Frontiers in Psychiatry, on January 25th, 2013, the review of more than one hundred studies focusing on 16 high-quality controlled studies looked at the effects of yoga on depression, schizophrenia, ADHD, sleep complaints, eating disorders and cognition problems.

Yoga in popular culture

Yoga is a popular exercise and is practiced by 15.8 million adults in the United States alone, according to a survey by the Harris Interactive Service Bureau, and its holistic goal of promoting psychical and mental health is widely held in popular belief.

“However, yoga has become such a cultural phenomenon that it has become difficult for physicians and patients to differentiate legitimate claims from hype,” wrote the authors in their study. “Our goal was to examine whether the evidence matched the promise.”

Read the entire article here

January 25, 2013 Posted by | Consumer Health, Psychology | , , , , | Leave a comment

Let’s solve our most pressing healthcare problems first

From the 24 January 2013 post at KevinMD.com

“He’s dead, Jim.”

So here’s my beef. At the recent Forbes Healthcare Summit  there was a lot of focus on speakers and vendors offering very cool new tech, from future “Tricorders” that can diagnose multiple diseases, is non-invasive, and hand-held; personal genomics, where data from your own genome is cheap and easy to get and can be integrated with clinical knowledge to produce better care; targeted therapies for various diseases, using the specific biology of a patient and her disease to design a treatment.

All of these are awesome, but really have little impact on our most pressing healthcare problems.

In the U.S., we manage to deliver a triple-whammy: health care that is less effective than in other nations, is only available to limited numbers of people, and costs a ton. There are a number of factors that go into this, most of which are historico-cultural.

The article goes on to say how folks are marginalized through being unemployed, falling through cracks (as being poor and single), profit driven health care facilities, lack of data sharing, and more.

 

 

Read the entire article here

 

January 25, 2013 Posted by | health care | , , , , | Leave a comment

Overdiagnosis: An epidemic or minor concern?

From the 24th January 2013 article at Medical News Today

An editorial by two oncologists in the New Year’s issue of Annals of Internal Medicine discusses overdiagnosis, a controversial health problem that some have called “a modern epidemic” but others, including the editorialists, feel is a minor concern. Although many chronic conditions are overdiagnosed, cancer is the most thoroughly studied, as well as the most emotionally charged.

I am a generally healthy man with no family history of significant health problems. Yet increasing numbers of men like me who are approaching middle age may be shadowed by a sniper on a rooftop, each armed with a highly accurate loaded rifle pointed directly at our heads. By age 70, nearly half of all men will be shadowed by a sniper, though in only 3 percent of us will he actually take the fatal shot. A 1 in 30 chance of being assassinated without warning still seems too high, and therefore health authorities concerned about the problem of snipers on rooftops recommend that all men after age 50 (or perhaps 40) be offered routine surveillance to determine if there’s a sniper up there. If there is, perhaps he can be safely disarmed.

The  trouble is, the disarmament team is successful at best, 21 percent of the time(reducing a man’s chance of being shot from 3 percent to a barely more reassuring 2.4 percent), and at worst, hardly ever. In addition, attempts to subdue snipers by force often lead to unwanted consequences: stray shots fired in the scuffle that causenon-lethal but persistent injuries to the bladder and reproductive system. In about 1 in 300 men, the attempt to disarm the sniper goes terribly wrong, causing the gunshot to miss the head but deliver an equally fatal round through the heart….

Back to the Annals editorial about overdiagnosis in breast cancer. The authors write:

We believe that the term “overdiagnosis” in the context of breast cancer places this problem in an inappropriate light, suggesting that these patients do not have cancer. The question is not whether we should find early, more easily treatable cases of breast cancer but rather how to treat early-stage cancer found on mammography. … For the individual patient, the question is not whether to have a mammogram that might “overdiagnose” breast cancer but how to treat the early-diagnosed non-invasive or invasive breast cancer once we have found it.

Finally, I apologize to any of you who were offended by my explicit comparison of overdiagnosis to gun violence, given the recent tragedy that has drawn belated attention to the latter as a public health problem.

 

 

 

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January 25, 2013 Posted by | health care | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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