Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

The stigma experienced by patients with psychiatric disorders

From the 24 July 2013 post at KevinMD.com

“It don’t matter how many men you shot in Memphis,” the saying goes, “if your name is Sierra or Sequoia, you can’t sing the blues”. In a sense, this adage reworks an older, more bitter joke from the civil rights era, the one that begins “some of my best friends are …” and ends with “but you wouldn’t want your sister to marry one.” Both statements embody stigma, the social effects of being someone who violates others’ expectations or fails to fit into an assigned social niche.

Stigma attached to illness has a long, ignoble history. The most classic example, the devalued social role of lepers, illustrates its classic elements: fear and avoidance. Deformities elicit basic revulsion in many, while infections also trigger fear of contagion. Historically, some of the positive stigma that doctors enjoy reflects our ability to transcend our fears and provide care to those whom society would consign to the desert beyond the pale of a socially integrated life.

In modern times, patients with psychiatric disorders (including addictions) experience stigma in painful and damaging ways. The American Journal of Public Health devoted its entire May edition to the consequences of the stigma that plagues those with mental illness and the disordered behaviors that it often causes. The bottom line of the Journal’s complex assessment across many articles: stigma kilIs. According to Hautzenbuehler et al, increased health care costs, poorer health outcomes and, most tellingly, premature death are all consequences of having a psychiatric disorder of any kind. While we all intuitively “get” why people with schizophrenia or addictions might face stigma based on their disruptive, non conforming behavior and the frustration caused by the intractability of their conditions, the negative consequences of having a psychiatric disorder also extend to otherwise normal appearing people with depression and anxiety, and, most tragically, to children.

Read the entire post here

 

July 25, 2013 - Posted by | health care | , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. Reblogged this on http://www.HumansinShadow.wordpress.com.

    Comment by curi56 | July 25, 2013 | Reply

  2. Reblogged this on seachranaidhe1.

    Comment by seachranaidhe1 | July 25, 2013 | Reply

  3. […] The stigma experienced by patients with psychiatric disorders (jflahiff.wordpress.com) […]

    Pingback by Looking For Attention: The Stigma in Mental Health Discussions | The Stretch For Something Beautiful | July 28, 2013 | Reply


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