Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

The wacky world of prescription prior authorizations

English: National Naval Medical Center, Bethes...

English: National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., (Aug. 19, 2003) — Pharmacist Randal Heller, right, verifies the dosage and medication of a prescription at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Heller checks all prescriptions dispensed at the pharmacy before they are handed over the counter to the patient. Heller is retired as a Commander from the Navy Medical Service Corps. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Warrant Officer 4 Seth Rossman. (RELEASED) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pharmacists are among my favorite professionals.
I’ve always been able to get expert prescription drug related information (as side effects) and OTC advice for free! Even when I wasn’t their customer.

But even they are human and have their customer service pet peeves.
Don’t we all who work with clients, customer, and “the public”.
(Just hope I’m not one of those wacky customers!).

 

From the 26 July 2013 KevinMD article

 | MEDS | JULY 26, 2013

It’s happened at last: the epitome of ridiculousness in the already pretty ridiculous world of drug prior authorizations. I wish I could say that I made this up.

I got a fax from a pharmacy requesting a prior authorization for a brand name drug called Protonix, one of a family of medications used to treat ulcers, acid reflux, and other forms of tummy ache. This happens. Because there are five different drugs in this class (not counting generics), there is no way I can keep straight which plans prefer which drug. Sadly, switching patients from one medication to another, even if it’s working just fine, purely because of which drug maker is in bed with which insurance plan, is an everyday event. No big deal.

Here’s the thing: the patient was already doing well on pantoprazole, which happens to be generic Protonix. What?

The fax from the pharmacy has more information: “The patient wants a prescription for brand name Protonix because she has a coupon that will allow her to pay only $4.00 for it.”

It just so happens that pantoprazole is already on the list of $4.00 generics!

But, says the pharmacy, that’s what the patient wants.

Read the entire article here

July 26, 2013 - Posted by | health care | , , , , , , , , ,

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