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General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

STATISTICAL BRIEF #424: The Long-Term Uninsured in America, 2008-2011 (Selected Intervals): Estimates for the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population under Age 65

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STATISTICAL BRIEF #424: The Long-Term Uninsured in America, 2008-2011 (Selected Intervals): Estimates for the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population under Age 65.

    From the Web page of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

November 2013
Jeffrey A. Rhoades, PhD and Steven B. Cohen, PhD

Highlights

  • Approximately 20.4 million people, 7.6 percent of the population under age 65, were uninsured for the four-year period from 2008 through 2011. The percentage of long-term uninsured exceeded 10 percent for some younger adult age groups.
  • Adults ages 18 to 24 and 25 to 29 were the most likely to be uninsured for at least one month (48.0 and 46.9 percent, respectively) during 2010-2011. Children under age 18 were the least likely to be uninsured for the full four-year period from 2008-2011 (2.3 percent).
  • Individuals reported to be in excellent or very good health status were the least likely to be uninsured for at least one month during 2010 to 2011 (26.6 and 31.1 percent, respectively).
  • Hispanics were most likely to be uninsured for at least one month during 2010 to 2011 (47.8 percent) and for 2008-2011 (17.4 percent).
  • Hispanics were disproportionately represented among the long-term uninsured. While they represented 18.2 percent of the population under age 65, they comprised 41.5 percent of the long-term uninsured for 2008-2011.
  • Individuals who were poor, near poor, and low income were represented disproportionately among the long-term uninsured. While poor individuals represented 16.8 percent of the population under age 65, they represented 29.9 percent of those uninsured for 2008-2011.

 

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January 12, 2014 - Posted by | health care | , , ,

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