Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblog] Measuring Quality of Care for Older Adults With Serious Illness

From he 22 January 2014 post at HealthAffairsBlog

by Laura Hanson, Anna Schenck, and Helen Burstin

Editor’s Note: This post is the third in a periodic Health Affairs Blog series on palliative care, health policy, and health reform. The series features essays adapted from and drawing on an upcoming volume, Meeting the Needs of Older Adults with Serious Illness: Challenges and Opportunities in the Age of Health Care Reform, in which clinicians, researchers and policy leaders address 16 key areas where real-world policy options to improve access to quality palliative care could have a substantial role in improving value. 

In the United States, value is the new health care imperative – improving quality while controlling costs.  We spend nearly twice the rate of comparable nations, yet have poorer health outcomes.  In 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), mandating a new emphasis on paying for value, not volume.

Our greatest opportunity to enhance value in US health care is to improve quality of care for older adults with serious illness – the group who uses the most health care services. Serious illness, in which patients are unlikely to recover, stabilize, or be cured, is life-altering for patients and family caregivers.  It includes advanced, symptomatic stages of diseases such as congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, cancer, kidney failure, and dementia. Serious illness may also refer to the cumulative consequences of multiple conditions progressing over time, causing functional decline or frailty.

We’ve made important progress in understanding high quality care for this population of patients.  Researchers have asked patients with serious illness and their families how they define high quality care.  Especially in serious illness, patients want control over treatment through shared decision-making.   Even when there is no cure, most patients still want health care that helps them live longer – but only if they can also get help with function, physical comfort, and attention to family, emotional and spiritual needs.

We know what types of health care help patients and families cope with serious illness.  A 2012 report to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality finds evidence for three types of care to improve health outcomes:

  1. Expert pain and symptom treatment
  2. Communication to engage patient preferences for treatment decisions
  3. Interdisciplinary palliative care

We’ve developed quality measures to understand how often real-world care lives up to these ideals.

……

 

Read the entire article here

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January 26, 2014 - Posted by | health care | , , , , ,

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