Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblog] Journalist explains what to expect from new mental health parity rules

From the 27 January 2014 post at Covering Health – Monitoring the pulse of health care journalism

by | January 27, 2014

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Michelle AndrewsMichelle Andrews

Later this year, health plans will be under new mental health parity rules affecting how insurers should cover patients with mental health and substance abuse disorders.

Michelle Andrews, a health policy reporter and columnist for Kaiser Health News, explains the issue in a new tip sheet,  “Mental health parity rule clarifies standards for treatment limits, coverage of intermediate care.”

These rules, governing the limits that health insurers can place on coverage for patients needing mental health and substance abuse care, will be important to consumers for several reasons. One reason involves what services health plans must provide when covering mental health benefits –keep in mind that health plans do not need to offer mental health care. But if they do, they need to cover inpatient and outpatient services, emergency room care and prescription drugs, Andrews reports. Also, the rules prohibit health insurers from setting limits on treatment that are more restrictive than the limits set on a plan’s medical-surgical coverage, she adds.

In addition, intermediate-level mental health services, such as residential treatment and intensive outpatient services for patients needing substance abuse treatment or mental health care, should be covered at the same level as the insurer covers residential and intensive outpatient services for medical-surgical patients, Andrews adds. Often patients needing mental health and substance abuse care require residential or intensive outpatient treatment.

The new parity rules also do not allow health insurers to charge higher co-payments, deductibles, or out-of-pocket maximums for mental health and substance abuse treatment without setting similar co-payment, deductibles, and out-of-pocket limits for medical-surgical coverage.

 

 

Read the entire article here

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January 28, 2014 - Posted by | health care | , , , ,

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