Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Press release] Innovative gaming research gains national recognition

Just completed an online continuing ed medical librarian class on emerging technologies.
Week 4 focused on gamification. Went into the course a bit wary on gamification. However,
if developed and implemented properly, it could prevent medical errors.
A local hospital was in the news two years ago for a failed kidney transplant procedure. The donor kidney was placed in the medical waste container. By the time the error was noticed, the kidney was no longer usable.

From the 14 March 2014 EurkAlert

A collaborative project in North Texas could help physicians and nurses improve communication.

 IMAGE: In GLIMPSE, physicians and nurses are helping researchers determine if a video game simulation can improve their communication skills.Click here for more information.

Television shows have been using tension between hospital personnel as compelling drama for years. But, in the real world, misunderstandings and miscommunication in the healthcare environment can cause errors with long-lasting, even fatal consequences.

With that in mind, researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing, Baylor Scott & White Health and UT Dallas developed a video-game simulation that they say can teach doctors and nurses to work more collaboratively by playing out tense situations in a virtual world.

The federally funded project recently received two national awards at the 4th Annual Serious Games and Virtual Environments Arcade & Showcase during the 2014 International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare in San Francisco. The honors included a Best-in-Show award for the Academic Faculty Category and a 4th place award in the Technology Innovations division.

“Our hope is that this project will enhance patient safety and, ultimately, improve patient outcomes,” said Beth Mancini, a UT Arlington nursing professor and Associate Dean of the College of Nursing. “Being honored by the judges at this year’s International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare tells us that the virtual learning environment we’ve built is among the very best in terms of content and design.”

Read the entire press release here

Links to a few items from the course I took

  • Gamification pioneer Yu-kai Chou, provides an overview of Gamification.
    (His Web site including description of Octoanlysis is here)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5Qjuegtiyc

 

From the class….Choose read a minimum of two (2) of these articles to get a better sense of how gamification is being used in various industries.

  1. In Gaming, A Shift from Enemies to Emotions. NPR. All Tech Considered. January 7, 2014.
  2. Silverman, Rachel (Nov 2, 2011). “Latest Game Theory: Mixing Work and Play — Companies Adopt gaming Techniques to Motivate Employees”. Wallstreet Journal.
  3. Takahashi, Dean (August 25, 2010). “Website builder DevHub gets users hooked by “gamifying” its service”. VentureBeat.
  4.  Sinanian, Michael (April 12, 2010). “The ultimate healthcare reform could be fun and games”. Venture Beat.
  5. A Game wit Heart, Gone Home is a Bold Step in Storytelling. NPR. All Tech Considered. Dec. 26, 2013.

March 14, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Explore causes of regional variations in premiums | Association of Health Care Journalists

 Explore causes of regional variations in premiums | Association of Health Care Journalists

Excerpts from the 4 March 2014 blog item

The regional variations are more complicated. It’s not as simple as labor costs in New York being higher than those in Arkansas.

Competition is a big factor. The highest prices aren’t necessarily in a big city. Some of the highest rates are in rural areas with few health care providers and scant competition to drive prices down.

Narrow networks, where there are fewer doctors and hospitals, or at least fewer name-brand hospitals, are also a factor. Not all consumers want these – although some are willing to make that tradeoff to save money.

There also may be fewer insurers offering coverage in the exchanges in some areas. Even where competition is minimal, the medical loss ratio in the Affordable Care Act limits how much profit an insurer can make or at least limits how much of the premium people pay can be used for nonmedical purposes – including profit. They have to rebate the money if they don’t meet MLR.

Local health care history and how it has affected incentives and efficiency is a factor. For instance, Minnesota, which has some of the lowest premiums, has been working on delivery system, integrated care and managed care for years.

Also, regional oddities – such as a mountainous section of Colorado that has to medevac people by helicopter – can play a role in why one section of a state pays more than others.

Jordan Rau of Kaiser Health News has written about the cheapest and most expensive markets nationally. Katie Kerwin McCrimmon of Health News Colorado has written about the controversy in Colorado about why people in one community pay more than people in an adjacent community. (Here and here).

 

 

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March 14, 2014 Posted by | health care | , | Leave a comment

Explore how changing nursing home culture affects care

From the 28 January 2014 article at Covering Health

 

Any journalist who covers nursing homes should check out this month’s special supplement in The Gerontologist, the Gerontological Society of America’s journal. It focuses on the two-decade long effort to change nursing home culture and many of the articles and studies raise important questions about whether enough progress has been shown.

English: Nursing Home in Goldthorn Hill. This ...

English: Nursing Home in Goldthorn Hill. This area of Wolverhampton has a cluster of nursing homes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For example, this study finds that nursing homes that are considered culture change adopters show a nearly 15 percent decrease in health-related survey deficiency citations relative to comparable nonadopting homes. This study looks at what is meant by nursing home culture change – the nature and scope of interventions, measurement, adherence and outcomes.  Harvard health policy expert David Grabowski and colleagues take a closer look at some of the key innovators in nursing home care and what it might mean for health policy – particularly in light of the Affordable Care Act’s directive to provide more home and community-based care. Other articles look at the THRIVE study, mouth care, workplace practices, Medicaid reimbursement, and more policy implications.

Any of these studies — or several taken together — can serve as a jumping off point for local coverage. Are there nursing homes in your community that are doing things differently? Have any instituted policies or processes that show improvements in care coordination, outcomes, quality, or other key measures? Are there homes that are resisting change? Why? Which one(s) best exemplify person-centered care? How do these changes affect the workforce?

Nursing Home Compare from CMS provides the data behind complaints, violations, quality, and cost, among other metrics. This article in The Philadelphia Inquirer is a great example of interweaving research with personal narrative. Another approach might be to look at trends in the city, state, or region. How are nursing homes marketing themselves to consumers? To referral sources? Have their business models changed?

Experts on all sides have been talking about culture change for more than a decade. And in 2008, a Commonwealth Fund report explored culture change in nursing homes. Has the time finally come, for real?

 

Read the entire article here

 

Unfortunately, the articles referred to are subscription based only.
For information on how to get them for free or low cost, click here.

 

Articles referred to above

 

  • Transforming Nursing Home Culture: Evidence for Practice and Policy

     

  • What Does the Evidence Really Say About Culture Change in Nursing Homes?
  • A “Recipe” for Culture Change? Findings From the THRIVE Survey of Culture Change Adopters
  • High-Performance Workplace Practices in Nursing Homes: An Economic Perspective
  • Medicaid Capital Reimbursement Policy and Environmental Artifacts of Nursing Home Culture Change
  • Building a State Coalition for Nursing Home Excellence
  • Implications for Policy: The Nursing Home as Least Restrictive Setting

     

 

 

 

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March 14, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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