Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblog]Technology and the doctor-patient relationship

Technology and the doctor-patient relationship.

From the 1 July 2014 KevinMD article

I often hear people talking about their doctors.  I overhear it restaurants, nail salons, while walking down the street. I hear what people think of their doctors, what their doctors said or what they didn’t say, why people were disappointed by or validated by their doctors.  I hear people analyzing, criticizing, and surmising about this relationship quite a bit, and I don’t blame them. The relationship you have with your doctor is a critical one, and yet it is fraught with misunderstanding, disappointment, and distrust. People didn’t used to doubt their doctors the way they do today, and I believe the essence of the doctor-patient  relationship has degraded in our culture.

 

In large part, I believe this is due to technology.

The Mayo Clinic recently announced they have partnered with Apple to create what they call the Health Kit.  Although the details are still unknown, the product is supposedly one that will allow patients to become more involved in their health care, from diagnosis to treatment delivery. This has always been the doctor’s job, but with the technology booming, it is no surprise that the next step would be computerized health care.

So is this a good thing, or a bad thing? I have mixed feelings, and I think the results will be mixed as well. Statistics show that positive relationships and supportive interactions with others are crucial parts of living a healthy life. Can a computer ever truly replace that je ne se quoi that occurs between a doctor and a patient?  In my own practice, I would like to believe that the interaction between my patients and myself is part of what leads to healing. I don’t believe a computer could do that as well as I can.

Here’s the problem, though.  Doctors are inundated with demands from insurance companies, paperwork, accountability measures, and check lists upon checklists required for medical records, billing, and measurable use. This situation worsened several years ago, with the mandatory implementation of Electronic Medical Records, and then even worse since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

These changes have also affected patients, many of whom have had to drop doctors they have had for many years because those doctors didn’t take the new insurance. The message, whether stated outright or not by advocates or detractors of the new systems, is that this doctor-patient relationship is not really all that important.

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July 9, 2014 - Posted by | health care | , , , , , ,

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