Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Report] Surveying Health Care Quality & Value

Surveying Health Care Quality & Value

From the 24 November 2014 Robert Woods Foundation report

Recent years have brought numerous efforts to educate and engage Americans in what “quality” health care is, how to find it and how they can get better value for their dollars. To better understand the latest trends, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research at the University of Chicago to conduct three surveys through the summer and fall of 2014.

The surveys each individually examined how consumers and employers, as purchasers, perceive health care quality and how they use quality information and performance data on health plans and providers. Learn more about the research and access links to the full reports with accompanying materials.

 

 A medical assistant checks a patient's blood pressure and pulse.

Consumer Awareness of Provider Quality and Value

A number of initiatives in recent years have aimed at engaging consumers in making informed health care decisions, including empowering patients and their caregivers with data on provider quality, performance, cost and value. The first in the series of surveys looks at the inroads these efforts have made.

Thirty-seven percent of respondents don’t believe that higher health care costs correlate with better quality care—but 48 percent think they do. The poll also found that more than two-thirds say finding a doctor or hospital that offers the highest quality at the lowest possible cost is important to them. The survey also showed getting Americans to find quality information and use it in their health care decisions remains a challenge, with only 11 percent of Americans reporting they have done so.

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See the full survey results

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Cost- and Coverage-Based Decision-Making

As more provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are implemented over the next decade, the government projects that approximately 12 million additional people younger than 65 will enter the private insurance market. The second in the series of surveys looks at consumer opinions on health care costs and coverage, and how it impacts their decision-making.

It shows that nearly a fifth of insured Americans report skipping a trip to the doctor when they’re sick or injured to save money, and only 36 percent are confident they can pay for a major, unexpected medical expense. Those enrolled in health plans with high deductibles are greatly impacted by the out-of-pocket cost of health care—they are concerned with the uncertainty of major expenses, skip necessary medical treatment, and experience real financial burden when obtaining health care.

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See the full survey results

Billboard Illustration for SHADAC ESI Report April 2013

Employers Use of Quality Information in Purchasing

As a group, employers represent the largest purchaser of care in the United States. Given this, it is critical that they demand good value for the money they spend, ensuring that the plans offered to employees be high quality. The third and final report in the series of surveys looks at the opinions of private sector employers, including small-, medium- and large-sized businesses.

It shows that American firms are hesitant to say they would pay more for higher quality care, and when it comes to measuring quality, 90 percent don’t know or don’t use independent quality information when deciding on what plans to offer employees. And while many employers are indeed providing wellness programs to benefit their employees’ health, relatively few are actively promoting those programs or offering incentives for participation.

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See the full survey results

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December 5, 2014 - Posted by | health care | , , , , , ,

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