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[Reblog] A ‘birth lottery’ still determines who gets to live longest, healthiest life

A ‘birth lottery’ still determines who gets to live longest, healthiest life | joe rojas-burke.

From the 16 June 2014 post at JOE ROJAS-BURKE- Science Writer

The latest data suggest that lack of social mobility remains as significant a problem as it was decades ago. In the generation entering the U.S. workforce today, those who started life in the bottom fifth of income distribution have about a 9 percent chance of reaching the top fifth. That compares with an 8.4 percent chance for kids born in 1971, according to research by economists Raj Chetty of Harvard, Emmanuel Saez of the University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues.

What’s astonishing are the huge differences in mobility depending on where you grow up, The odds of escaping poverty and gaining prosperity are less than 3 percent for kids in many places across the South and Rust Belt states. But in some parts of the Great Plains, more than 25 percent of kids born to the poorest parents move into the upper-income strata as adults, the economists found. The datasets are available here.

The probability that a child born in the bottom fifth of the income distribution will reach the top fifth of the income distribution, based on data for those born from 1980-85. (Source:   Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, and Emmanuel Saez)

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the places on this map with the lowest social mobility also tend to have the worst health outcomes. Lack of mobility is strongly correlated with worse segregation, greater income inequality, poor local school quality, diminished social capital, and broken family structure – factors that are also linked to poor health.

Even when poor children manage to escape poverty, a “birth lottery” may still determine who gets to live longest and healthiest. Exposure to adverse conditions during fetal development and early infancy appears to be capable of causing irreversible consequences decades later, such as increased vulnerability to weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, and premature death.

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January 22, 2015 - Posted by | Public Health | , , , , ,

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