Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

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March 10, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“Advocacy research” not necessarily scientific

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A recent article in the National Review used the term “advocacy research” to describe unscientific articles published in predatory journals to promote a social or political agenda.

I have been observing and blogging about this for some time and wish I had come up with the term “advocacy research,” for it fits the concept perfectly.

The National Review article says,

Another trend, related and equally worrisome, is the increasing frequency of publication of the results of flawed “advocacy research” that is designed to give a false result that supports a certain cause or position and can be cited by activists long after the findings have been discredited. The articles are often found in the predatory open-access journals.

Because journals with an honest peer review process won’t publish unscientific advocacy research, predatory journals have become the venue of choice for people promoting unscientific agendas.

Here’s an example — illustrated in the screenshot above — with both a political and commercial motive. The article, “Asbestos-Related Research: First Objectivity then Conclusions,” (HTML, PDF) tries to make the case that government regulations prohibiting the manufacture and sale of asbestos products are “excessive.”

 

Read the entire blog post here

March 10, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New report: 25 percent of Texans say they don’t understand basic health insurance terms

From the 8 March 2015 Rice University news release

Excerpt

HOUSTON – (March 8, 2016) – Approximately 25 percent of Texans say they lack confidence in understanding some of the most basic terminology about health insurance plans, according to a new report released today by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation (EHF). The report found uninsured, low-income and Hispanic Texans were least likely to understand health-plan terms like “premium,” “copayment and “provider network.”

Credit: thinkstockphotos.com/Rice University

Credit: thinkstockphotos.com/Rice University

The survey asked Texans about their confidence level in understanding seven terms that describe various features of health insurance plans. While one-quarter of all the respondents lacked confidence in their understanding of the terminology, there are significant differences among various subgroups.

Researchers found at least half of those who are uninsured said they didn’t fully understand five of the seven terms. In fact, the rates of lack of confidence for uninsured Texans were nearly double that of those with health insurance.

“This research shows that understanding the key parts of a health insurance plan can be tough, especially for the uninsured,” said Elena Marks, EHF’s president and CEO and a nonresident health policy fellow at the Baker Institute. “These numbers illustrate the continuing need to offer education and outreach targeting the uninsured so they can better understand their health insurance options.”

– See more at: http://news.rice.edu/2016/03/08/new-report-25-percent-of-texans-say-they-dont-understand-basic-health-insurance-terms/#sthash.vadJ9t9y.dpuf

March 10, 2016 Posted by | health care | , | Leave a comment

Want a younger brain? Stay in school — and take the stairs [news release]

From the 9th March 2016 Concordia University news release

Excerpt

A Concordia study shows that education and physical activity can significantly slow down grey-matter aging
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Montreal, March 9, 2016 — Taking the stairs is normally associated with keeping your body strong and healthy. But new research shows that it improves your brain’s health too — and that education also has a positive effect.

In a study recently published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, researchers led by Jason Steffener, a scientist at Concordia’s PERFORM Centre, show that the more flights of stairs a person climbs, and the more years of school a person completes, the “younger” their brain physically appears.

The researchers found that brain age decreases by 0.95 years for each year of education, and by 0.58 years for every daily flight of stairs climbed — i.e., the stairs between two consecutive floors in a building.

“There already exist many ‘Take the stairs’ campaigns in office environments and public transportation centres,” says Steffener. “This study shows that these campaigns should also be expanded for older adults, so that they can work to keep their brains young.”

March 10, 2016 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

Study: No Link Between Bully Victimization, Future Substance Abuse

From the 8 March 2016 University of Dallas News Center

Excerpt

“The research by three criminologists in UT Dallas’ School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (EPPS) discovered that students who were bullied in third grade did not have a greater risk of using drugs or alcohol by ninth grade.

But the researchers found that children who had experienced the highest level of victimization smoked cigarettes or used alcohol at higher rates than high school peers. The study noted that experimentation with drugs and alcohol is common among adolescents regardless of whether they had been bullied.

“The findings speak to the necessity of continuing to encourage meaningful substance use prevention programs during adolescence and making sure students have the resilience skills necessary to stay away from substances,” said Dr. Nadine Connell, assistant professor of criminologyand lead author of the study. “Early in-school victimization may, however, have other consequences that should be explored.””

March 10, 2016 Posted by | Psychiatry, Psychology | , , | Leave a comment

   

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