Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Wellness tips throughout January (Twitter chat on Jan 16 and tips via Twitter)

From the NIH news item , January 2018

Throughout January, many agencies at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including NCCIH, are sharing information about health and wellness on Twitter. We are covering a broad range of topics, including general wellness, healthy eating, disease prevention, physical activity, managing stress and anxiety, quitting smoking, and healthy aging

NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health banner image
Health and Wellness Information banner image

Join us and other @NIH agencies for #NIHHealthy2018 chat on January 16 from 12 noon-4 p.m. ET. We’re sharing information on managing #stress and anxiety, quitting #smoking, #mindfulness, weight control, and more! The schedule follows (all times are Eastern Standard):

 

  • 12-12:20 p.m. ET:  Live Periscope panel with experts from @NIMHgov, @NIDDKgov, and @NIH_NHLBI
  • 12:20-1p.m.:  Managing Stress and Anxiety Twitter Chat
  • 1-2 p.m.:  Healthy Eating, Exercise, & Healthy Aging Twitter Chat
  • 2-3 p.m.:  Health, Wellness, & Disease Prevention Twitter Chat
  • 2:30-3 p.m.:  Live Q&A with Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., @NIHDirector
  • 3-4 p.m.: Kicking Habits Twitter Chat

 

Click on the link below to see the wellness tips that agencies throughout NIH have shared on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23NIHHealthy2018&src=typd

 

January 10, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

[Reblog] Has an Alternative to Table Sugar Contributed to the C. Diff. Epidemic?

Excerpts from the  post on

Ice cream sundae

Most of us know how hard it is to resist the creamy sweetness of ice cream. But it might surprise you to learn that, over the past 15 years or so, some makers of ice cream and many other processed foods—from pasta to ground beef products—have changed their recipes to swap out some of the table sugar (sucrose) with a sweetening/texturizing ingredient called trehalose that depresses the freezing point of food. Both sucrose and trehalose are “disaccharides.” Though they have different chemical linkages, both get broken down into glucose in the body. Now, comes word that this switch may be an important piece of a major medical puzzle: why Clostridium difficile (C. diff) has emerged as a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections.

A new study in the journal Nature indicates that trehalose-laden food may have helped fuel the recent epidemic spread of C. diff., which is a microbe that can cause life-threatening gastrointestinal distress, especially in older patients getting antibiotics and antacid medicines [1, 2]. In laboratory experiments, an NIH-funded team found that the two strains of C. diff. most likely to make people sick possess an unusual ability to thrive on trehalose, even at very low levels. And that’s not all: a diet containing trehalose significantly increased the severity of symptoms in a mouse model of C. diff. infection.

What has changed is the recent addition of man-made trehalose into the food supply, often in large quantities. This shift was prompted by a new method to manufacture trehalose from cornstarch, which made the sugar much less costly.

This doesn’t mean that everyone needs to start worrying about trehalose. In fact, Britton says the sugar does have some advantages. For instance, because it’s harder to break down, trehalose doesn’t cause blood glucose to spike in the way some other sugars do.

 

 

January 10, 2018 Posted by | Consumer Health, Health News Items, Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Reblog] Recap of clinical trial on skin cancer treatment includes both strengths and weaknesses of the findings

From the January 8, 2018 HealthNewsReview article by Earle Holland, Dan Mayer, and Kathlyn Stone

Our Review Summary

This release reports on a large multi-center clinical trial intended to gauge the preventative value of using a cream containing 5 percent fluorouacil as a means of reducing the occurrence of both squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinomas. It says that the cream appears to reduce the risk of squamous cell carcinomas among the elderly veterans in the trial by 75 percent, although it has no statistically significant effect on reducing basal cell carcinomas. The release also states that the protection appears to only extend for the first year.

The release omits mention of the drug’s hefty price tag but it does clearly state both the benefits and the risks of using the medicinal cream.

More at https://www.healthnewsreview.org/news-release-review/clearly-state-both-the-benefits-and-the-risks-of-using-the-medicinal-cream/

January 10, 2018 Posted by | Health News Items, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

   

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