Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

PubMed MeSH database changes

The PubMed** interface is being changed section by section.
The MeSH section has been revised. 
Here is a message from the GMRLIST (an email list for the National Network of Libraries of
Medicine-Greater Midwest Region (NN/LM-GMR) members)

Hi Folks,Many of you have noticed the change in the MeSH database interface.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh
NCBI is working to update the entire website – section by section.FYI:The Technical Bulletin article
on this change is at:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/jf11/jf11_pm_mesh_db.htmlThe updated brochures “Searching PubMed with MeSH are at:
PDF: http://nnlm.gov/training/resources/meshtri.pdf
Word: http://nnlm.gov/training/resources/meshtri.doc

If you have comments or questions about the new interface, feel free to contact NLM directly –
they welcome your feedback.http://apps.nlm.nih.gov/mainweb/siebel/nlm/index.cfm/


Here is a related posting from MEDLIB-L (a medical librarian listserv)

Here’s what I recvd. from NNLM: There have been some changes to MeSH.
–>Type your search term in the MeSH box.
–>Then click the box(es) on the left to select your term(s).
 –>Then click on the far right: Add to Search Builder Here are some helpful resources
(you have to click CTRL + Click for the URLs to work).

PubMed’s MeSH Database**
Searching with the MeSH Database
<http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/viewlet/mesh/searching/mesh1.html> (3 min., February 2011)
* Combining MeSH Terms Using the MeSH Database
<http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/viewlet/mesh/combining/mesh2.html> (3 min., February 2011)
* Applying Subheadings and Other Features of the MeSH Database
<http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/viewlet/mesh/subheadings/mesh3.html> (3 min., February 2011)
You can also see the MeSH Database section in the tutorial:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/disted/pubmedtutorial/020_

**Pubmed is the largest database of biomedical journal articles (some are free full text) in the world.
It is most often best searched using medical subject headings (MeSH).

The above two hyperlinks (PubMed and MeSH) including Help pages and tutorials.
Please do not hesitate to contact a public librarian, academic librarian, or medical librarian for assistance
in searching PubMed or locating medical articles.
In the case of academic or medical settings, call ahead to see what services the library has for the general
public.You just might be pleasantly surprised!

(You may also email me at jmflahiff@yahoo.com…I am willing to give free assistance which would
include about an hour of my time)

February 16, 2011 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Release of MCHL new ediition of Asthma in Children and Adolescents

From the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-Greater Midwest Region (NN/LM-GMR) news item:

The Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University released a new edition of a knowledge path about asthma in children and adolescents, its prevalence, and its impact on homes, schools, and communities.  The knowledge path includes tools for improving asthma management and care and staying abreast of new developments in pediatric asthma research. The knowledge path can be used by health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, researchers, and community advocates to learn more about asthma, for program development, and to locate training resources and information to answer specific questions. Separate sections point to resources about environmental triggers, medications and monitoring, and asthma management in school. The knowledge path is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/kp_asthma.html. A resource brief for families accompanies the knowledge path and is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/families/frb_asthma.html.

 

Related news article

Many with Asthma, Emphysema May Misuse Inhalers

February 11, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , | Leave a comment

US Department of Defense Patient Safety Program

The US Department of Defense Patient Safety Program was “was created [in 2001] to identify and report actual and potential problems in medical systems and processes and to implement effective actions to improve patient safety and health care quality throughout the MHS [Military Health System].

The Welcome Statement stresses that they “encourage a systems approach to creating a safer patient environment; engaging MHS leadership; promoting collaboration across all three services; and fostering trust, transparency, teamwork, and communication.”

The Home Page has a well organized Site Map with essential links, social media links, education/training links, and links to research and news items.

While many educational resources (as continuing education courses) are closed to the public, these educational items are freely available to all.  [Descriptions are from the Patient Safety Program Web Page]

Click here for more information about the Patient Safety Learning Center (PSLC).

  • Patient Falls Reduction Toolkit: Falls have been the number one harm event reported to the Department of Defense (DoD) Patient Safety Analysis Center (PSAC) since its inception. These tools are offered as guidance and are designed to assist you with creating an institutional awareness and response to patient falls – education, prevention, assessment, reassessment, intervention, and continuous improvement.Click here to access the Patient Falls Reduction Toolkit.

  • Professional Conduct Toolkit: The toolkit is designed for health professionals who may be serving in leadership roles or who are seeking resources for addressing behaviors that negatively impact patient safety and that disrupt the clinical work environment.

Click here to access the Professional Conduct Toolkit

  • Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR) Toolkit: Evidence shows that use of a structured communication tool known as SBAR can improve information exchange among healthcare team members and reduce the rate of adverse events.

Click here to access the Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR) Toolkit.

February 10, 2011 Posted by | Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

AIDS Education and Training Centers National Resource Center website

From the AIDS Education and Training Centers National Resource Center About Us Web page

AETC National Resource Center HomeTop of Banner

 

 

The AIDS Education and Training Centers (AETC) Program of the Ryan White CARE Act currently supports a network of 11 regional centers (and more than 130 local performance sites) that conduct targeted, multi-disciplinary education and training programs for healthcare providers treating persons with HIV/AIDS.

The AETCs serve all 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and the six U.S.-affiliated Pacific Jurisdictions.

The mission of the AETCs is to improve the quality of life of patients living with HIV/AIDS through the provision of high quality professional education and training. The AETC Program is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HIV/AIDS Bureau.

A few of the Web site’s features

  • Trainer Resources with self-study modules, adult learning training designs, teaching methods (including clinical, group, mentoring based) and training materials (as curricula and slide sets)
  • Clinician Resources with a manual, support tools (as pocket guide, charts, posters, and patient information)
  • Reference Materials with fact sheets, articles, and Web links.

 

 

 

February 5, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Finding Aids/Directories, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , , , | 3 Comments

Radiologists play key role in teaching physiology to medical students

Radiologists play key role in teaching physiology to medical students

From the February 1 2011 Eureka news alert

In order for medical students to ultimately provide quality patient care medical schools should turn to radiologists to help them teach physiology, one of the core disciplines of medicine, according to a study in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (www.jacr.org). Physiology is the science of the function of living systems.

“It is vital that medical schools provide first-rate physiology education for their students. We believe that radiologists have an important role to play in teaching physiology, just as many currently do in the teaching of anatomy,” said Richard B. Gunderman, MD, co-author of the study.

Radiologists created radiologic case studies using pairs of radiologic cases, one illustrating normal physiology and the second illustrating pathophysiology. The two radiologic images (normal and pathophysiology) were then used to focus on four broad physiologic principles that apply across all organ systems — homeostasis, biologic energy use, structure-function relationships, and communication. Two examples were given for each of the principles.

“Radiologic case studies can illustrate physiologic principles in ways that can enhance students’ grasp of both physiology and its role in helping physicians take better care of patients. As our study suggests, two radiologic examples of each principle (normal and pathologic) support the use of radiology to teach physiology,” said Gunderman.

“An understanding of physiology is absolutely vital to the ability to diagnose and treat diseases effectively and efficiently, and it is equally vital that future physicians receive a first-rate education in this discipline. As clinicians, radiologists can help students to appreciate the clinical relevance of their studies, and radiologic images provide powerful, visual illustrations of basic physiologic principles,” he said.

Related Sites

 

 

 

 

February 1, 2011 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Professional Health Care Resources | , , | Leave a comment

Access Full Text Life Science and Healthcare Texts Using A New NCBI Bookshelf Homepage

Access Full Text Life Science and Healthcare Texts Using A New NCBI Bookshelf Homepage

The NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) has released a new version of their “Bookshelf” homepage.

Bookshelf provides free access to over 700 texts in life science and healthcare. One of many NCBI resources,Bookshelf enables users to easily browse, retrieve, and read content, and spurs discovery of related information.

The 700+ texts include biomedical textbooks, other scientific titles, some genetic resources, such as Gene Review, and NCBI help manuals.

The search box includes options for Limits (as subject area, resource type) and an Advanced Search Option (as author, publisher, year).
Alternatively one can browse Browse Titles . Browsing results (one or two titles) can be used to create and modify a personal table of titles from one, two, or three columns/facets.
The columns include:

+ Types of books

+ Subjects

+ Publishers

One can learn more by taking a look at this tutorial about browsing the Bookshelf.Other tutorials cover search, searching “inside” a book, using limits, and advanced search. Links to all tutorials can be found on this page.

January 28, 2011 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , | 1 Comment

The International Child & Youth Care Network

CYC-NET

The International Child & Youth Care Network (CYC-NET) is a registered non-profit and public benefit organisation in South Africa. It aims to “promote and facilitate reading, learning, information sharing, discussion, networking, support and accountable practice amongst all who work with children, youth and families in difficulty.” However parents and others will undoubtedly find information at this Web site to be useful.

Many items at the home page are updated at least weekly as Daily News, Today, Press Release, and Link.

The home page has two main gateways to information through the tabs

  • Learning Zone with free online courses and training/educational podcasts
  • Network with site statistics, as recent top queries and the average number of daily visitors. On January 26,2011 the Recent top search queries were  bullied to death, homeless children statistics, bowlby, montesorri, anorexia nervosa, principles of management, punishment for children, bipolar disorder, peer influence, positive reinforcement for children, effects of corporal punishment, heroin stories.

January 27, 2011 Posted by | Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Health Information Technology Resources from NN/LM

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), Greater Midwest Region has a Web page devoted to health information technology resources. It includes links to pdf files of the presentations at the December 2010 meeting – “EHRs and Librarians: A Symposium”.

From the web page

Health information technology (Health IT or HIT) describes the management and secure exchange of health information among consumers, providers, government entities, and insurance agencies. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are a special focus of HIT. EHR’s can assist in maintaining an accurate picture of a patient’s health and to more securely share information between doctors. Using an EHR can replace paper medical records to maintain your health information.

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and Personal Health Records (PHRs)

In December 2010, the GMR held a meeting called “EHRs and Librarians: A Symposium” before the fall RAC meeting in December 2010. Below are pdf files of the presentations.

Regional Extension Centers – David Sweet

Summary: Overview about what Regional Extension Centers (RECs) are doing to assist health professionals with implementation of electronic health records; what AHIMA is doing related to RECs, and possible roles for librarians.

Using New Digital Resources to Promote and Understand PHRs – Allison Vance

Summary: Learn about AHIMA’s consumer education campaign, my Personal Health Record (myPHR), and the various digital resources available to librarians interested in assisting patients and community members with learning more about PHRs and larger health literacy issues.

Implementation of a Patient Portal and MedlinePlus Connect in a Low-Income Population – Maxine Rockoff, Ph.D.

Summary: The Institute for Family Health, a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers in Manhattan, the Bronx, and the Mid-Hudson Valley, has had an electronic medical record (EMR) since 2002. In 2008, the Institute implemented the patient portal for its EMR. This talk will present research findings to date from focus groups, a Health IT Readiness Survey, usability studies, a survey of providers & staff, and a statistical analysis of patients who received access codes and those who didn’t. The talk will also describe the process of developing MedlinePlus Connect with the National Library of Medicine, as well as some preliminary information on the classes developed for patients to teach them how to use these tools.

MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patients to Health Information – Joyce Backus

Summary: Overview and background for developing MedlinePlus Connect, a new service from the National Library of Medicine that allows electronic health records (EHR) systems to link users to information in MedlinePlus. MedlinePlus Connect delivers information about conditions and disorders, health and wellness, and prescription and over-the-counter medications to patients, families, and health care providers when it is needed. MedlinePlus Connect accepts requests for information on diagnoses (problem codes) and medications. For problem codes, MedlinePlus accepts ICD-9-CM and SNOMED CT CORE. For medications, MedlinePlus Connect accepts RXCUIs and NDCs. The API for this service conforms to the HL7 Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (Infobutton) Knowledge Request URL-Based Implementation specification.

The GMR has set up a listserv to continue the conversation about EHRs and PHRs. To subscribe to EMR-GMR, send the command SUBSCRIBE EMR-GMR BARACK OBAMA to listserv at uic.edu, replacing “Barack Obama” with your first and last name. Make sure the subject line is left blank.

HIT Resources

AHRQ

AHRQ National Registry Center for Health IT

AHIMA

American Health Information Management Association

Beacon Community Program

Beacon Communities will focus on specific and measureable improvement goals in the three vital areas for health systems improvement: quality, cost-efficiency, and population health.

MyPHR

MyPHR – Resources for seniors, parents, the chronically ill and more.

Health and Data Standards

Health Information Technology and Data Standards at NLM

HealthIT

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology

HRSA Health Information Technology

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration

Overview EHR Incentive Programs

Centers for Medicaare and Medicaid Services

Regional Extension Centers (RECs)

Explanation of the the Regional Extension Center Program

January 27, 2011 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Health Information Technology Resources from NN/NLM

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), Greater Midwest Region has a Web page devoted to health information technology resources. It includes links to pdf files of the presentations at the December 2010 meeting – “EHRs and Librarians: A Symposium”.

From the web page

Health information technology (Health IT or HIT) describes the management and secure exchange of health information among consumers, providers, government entities, and insurance agencies. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are a special focus of HIT. EHR’s can assist in maintaining an accurate picture of a patient’s health and to more securely share information between doctors. Using an EHR can replace paper medical records to maintain your health information.

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and Personal Health Records (PHRs)

In December 2010, the GMR held a meeting called “EHRs and Librarians: A Symposium” before the fall RAC meeting in December 2010. Below are pdf files of the presentations.

Regional Extension Centers – David Sweet
Summary: Overview about what Regional Extension Centers (RECs) are doing to assist health professionals with implementation of electronic health records; what AHIMA is doing related to RECs, and possible roles for librarians.

Using New Digital Resources to Promote and Understand PHRs – Allison Vance
Summary: Learn about AHIMA’s consumer education campaign, my Personal Health Record (myPHR), and the various digital resources available to librarians interested in assisting patients and community members with learning more about PHRs and larger health literacy issues.

Implementation of a Patient Portal and MedlinePlus Connect in a Low-Income Population – Maxine Rockoff, Ph.D.
Summary: The Institute for Family Health, a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers in Manhattan, the Bronx, and the Mid-Hudson Valley, has had an electronic medical record (EMR) since 2002. In 2008, the Institute implemented the patient portal for its EMR. This talk will present research findings to date from focus groups, a Health IT Readiness Survey, usability studies, a survey of providers & staff, and a statistical analysis of patients who received access codes and those who didn’t. The talk will also describe the process of developing MedlinePlus Connect with the National Library of Medicine, as well as some preliminary information on the classes developed for patients to teach them how to use these tools.

MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patients to Health Information – Joyce Backus
Summary: Overview and background for developing MedlinePlus Connect, a new service from the National Library of Medicine that allows electronic health records (EHR) systems to link users to information in MedlinePlus. MedlinePlus Connect delivers information about conditions and disorders, health and wellness, and prescription and over-the-counter medications to patients, families, and health care providers when it is needed. MedlinePlus Connect accepts requests for information on diagnoses (problem codes) and medications. For problem codes, MedlinePlus accepts ICD-9-CM and SNOMED CT CORE. For medications, MedlinePlus Connect accepts RXCUIs and NDCs. The API for this service conforms to the HL7 Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (Infobutton) Knowledge Request URL-Based Implementation specification.

The GMR has set up a listserv to continue the conversation about EHRs and PHRs. To subscribe to EMR-GMR, send the command SUBSCRIBE EMR-GMR BARACK OBAMA to listserv at uic.edu, replacing “Barack Obama” with your first and last name. Make sure the subject line is left blank.

Links to Health Information Technology Resources are also given

January 21, 2011 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , | Leave a comment

Call for clinical trial raw data to be freely available to all (& a related call from the scientific community)

A recent BMJ editorial (Goodbye PubMed, hello raw data) ****calls for clinical raw data to be freely available to everyone.
The author cites the example of  the influenza drug oseltamivir manufactured by Roche.

Reviewers for Cochrane Reviews asked Roche to release clinical trial data so they could systematically and comprehensively review antivirals as flu treatments. Roche refused, leaving the reviewers with inadequate incomplete information to complete their analysis.

The editor ends his article with these paragraphs…

From now on, they say, reviewers must have access to all unpublished data, not only from unpublished trials—the usual focus of concern about publication bias—but also from those that have been published in peer reviewed journals. Reviewers must assess entire trial programmes, and so new tools and methods are needed. If the trial reports are incomplete, reviewers should turn to reports from the drug regulators. As Tom Jefferson, the lead author for the Cochrane review, told me, “it’s goodbye PubMed, goodbye Embase.”

The reviewers have posted their new style protocol for this review on the Cochrane site and, recognising the enormity of the task, they are recording how much work is involved. But it must be clear to everyone that such a heroic approach is unsustainable across the whole of healthcare, given the resource constraints on academics and regulators. Which brings us back to what seems to be the only real solution—that the raw data from trials must be made freely available. Journals clearly have a role to play in making this happen, as An-Wen Chan agrees in his editorial (doi:10.1136/bmj.d80). The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors meets in a few months’ time. This will be on the agenda.

Scientists also see the need for access to research data.
The entire 2011 January/February issue of D-Lib Magazine is devoted to this topic.
**Cochrane Reviews are part of the Cochrane Collaboration, which
strives to provide the best evidence for health care. Cochrane reviews involve specific interventions in a specific clinical context, as antivirals for flu prevention in healthy adults. Individual reviews involve extensive literature research performed by independent teams of professionals.

Most reviews are only available through a paid subscription to the Cochrane Collaboration. However, many medical and academic libraries subscribe to the Cochrane Collaboration. Contact an academic reference librarian to see if they subscribe and if they provide access to the public.

****Via a MedLib posting by medical librarian Susan Fowler

 

January 20, 2011 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Finding Aids/Directories, Medical and Health Research News, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report – United States – 2011 (And Link About Recent WHO Report on Inequities and Avoidable Deaths)

In my humble opinion, a strong argument for affordable, accessible health care for all regardless of one’s income or where one lives. Health disparities   are not found only within groups of people who have the ability to pay for treatments or who are able to get needed treatment quickly.

While this train of thought may be labeled as creeping socialism, health care cost/access challenges are  a matter of justice and fairness for all.  Is there agreement on what is just or what is fair? Well, no. However, I believe we all can put differences aside in working for what is best for all.

 

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) January 13th news release

Americans’ differences in income, race/ethnicity, gender and other social attributes make a difference in how likely they are to be healthy, sick, or die prematurely, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For instance, state-level estimates in 2007 indicate that low income residents report five to 11 fewer healthy days per month than do high income residents, the report says. It also says men are nearly four times more likely than women to commit suicide, that adolescent birth rates for Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks are three and 2.5 times respectively those of whites, and that the prevalence of binge drinking is higher in people with higher incomes.

The data are in the new “CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2011”. The report also underscores the need for more consistent, nationally representative data on disability status and sexual orientation.

“Better information about the health status of different groups is essential to improve health. This first of its kind analysis and reporting of recent trends is designed to spur action and accountability at the federal, tribal, state and local levels to achieve health equity in this country,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

The report, the first of a series of consolidated assessments, highlights health disparities by sex, race and ethnicity, income, education, disability status and other social characteristics. Substantial progress in improving health for most U.S. residents has been made in recent years, yet persistent disparities continue.

Released as a supplement to CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the report addresses disparities at the national level in health care access, exposure to environmental hazards, mortality, morbidity, behavioral risk factors, disability status and social determinants of health – the conditions in which people are born, grow, live and work.

Findings from the report’s 22 essays include:

In 2007, non-Hispanic white men (21.5 per 100,000 population) were two to three times more likely to die in motor vehicle crashes than were non-Hispanic white women (8.8 per 100,000). The gender difference was similar in other race/ethnic groups.

In 2007, men (18.4 per 100,000) of all ages and races/ethnicities were approximately four times more likely to die by suicide than females (4.8 per 100,000).

In 2007, rates of drug-induced deaths were highest among non-Hispanic whites (15.1 per 100,000) and lowest among Asian/Pacific Islanders (2.0 per 100,000).

Hypertension is by far most prevalent among non-Hispanic blacks (42 percent vs. 29 percent among whites), while levels of control are lowest for Mexican-Americans (31.8 percent versus 46.5 percent among non-Hispanic whites).

Rates of preventable hospitalizations increase as incomes decrease. Data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality indicate that eliminating these disparities would prevent approximately 1 million hospitalizations and save $6.7 billion in health care costs each year.

Rates of adolescent pregnancy and childbirth have been falling or holding steady for all racial/ethnic minorities in all age groups. However, in 2008, disparities persist as birth rates for Hispanic adolescents (77.4 per 1,000 females) and non-Hispanic black adolescents (62.9 per 1,000 females) were three and 2.5 times those of whites (26.7 per 1,000 females), respectively.

In 2009, the prevalence of binge drinking was higher in groups with incomes of $50,000 or above (18.5 percent) compared to those with incomes of $15,000 or less (12.1 percent); and in college graduates (17.4 percent), compared to those with less than high school education (12.5 percent). However, people who binge drink and have less than $15,000 income binge drink more frequently (4.9 versus 3.6 episodes) and, when they do binge drink, drink more heavily (7.1 versus 6.5 drinks).

The report supports the Healthy People 2020 goals and the forthcoming National Partnership for Action (NPA) to End Health Disparities. The report also complements the upcoming AHRQ National Healthcare Disparities Report *** and underscores the need to connect those working in clinical care and public health, especially at the local level.

“CDC publishes this report today not only to address gaps in health between populations in our country but also to begin to measure progress in years to come in reducing these gaps and inequities going forward,” said Leandris Liburd, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.A., recently appointed director of CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity. Dr. Liburd will provide leadership for the office and CDC’s public health programs, policies, surveillance and research efforts in achieving health equity.

The full “CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2011”, is available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr.

*** AHRQ National Healthcare Disparities Report Fact Sheet
AHRQ- Measure Healthcare Quality, including section on National Healthcare Disparities Reports (2003-09) with related documents

  • Inequities and Avoidable Deaths (thirdworlddd.wordpress.com)
    Excerpts

    • When there are disparities, especially in health, there result avoidable deaths. The WHO estimates that better use of existing preventive measures could reduce the global burden of disease by as much as 70% (WHO, 3). That means that we already have much of the needed solutions, but why are we not implementing them? For example, Diarrheal Disease is a preventable, avoidable disease; with basic sanitation and access to clean water, a huge difference could be made in eradicating the affliction. Why are these things not being put into place?
    • What we can take from this is that we need to change the way we look at the disparities, by getting our hands dirty. We need to get into these places and ask questions, not answer them ourselves. The extent of human suffering is vast, but it needs to be witnessed in order to gain solutions. If these people can bare to live their lives full of inequities, inequalities, and misfortune, we can bare to listen to what they have to say.
  • Disability as a Disparity (couragecenter.wordpress.com)

January 19, 2011 Posted by | Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mount Sinai develops first screening tool for war veterans to assess traumatic brain injury

Mount Sinai develops first screening tool for war veterans to assess traumatic brain injury

From the January 5, 2011 Eureka news alert

A team of researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine has developed the first web-based screening tool for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). This instrument has recently been used by soldiers returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who participated in the Sixth Annual Road to Recovery Conference and Tribute in Orlando to determine if they sustained a TBI.

“Traumatic brain injury is underdiagnosed, and left untreated can have long-term cognitive, behavioral and physical effects,” said Wayne Gordon, PhD, the Jack Nash Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine and an Associate Director of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, who led the project. “If we can intervene and diagnose TBI early, then we can prevent further complications.”

Dr. Gordon and his team began working on this screening tool 20 years ago. Working in local schools, they found a surprising number of students with TBI but never reported it nor received medical attention, often because the injuries were sustained as a result of abuse or assault. Dr. Gordon wanted to develop an anonymous screening tool to help people assess their risk and avoid long-term complications.

The Brain Injury Screening Questionnaire (BISQ) is a web-based tool that allows users to anonymously answer a series of questions about whether they sustained a blow to the head in which they were unconscious or dazed, confused or disoriented. Their symptoms include sleep disturbances, irritability, memory disturbances, difficulties organizing daily tasks, and difficulty concentrating. At the end of the survey, participants receive a computer-generated report. Those who are found to be at risk are advised to seek further evaluation from a qualified health care professional.

According to Mark Wiederhold, MD, who presented at the conference, TBI was diagnosed in 41 percent of patients being treated in the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. Dr. Gordon hopes that more veterans’ organizations will embrace the tool in this population so that they are treated early.

“I applaud the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes and The American Legion for taking the first step toward bringing this serious issue to the forefront, and encouraging veterans to get screened,” said Dr. Gordon. “I hope more organizations around the country will follow suit.”

It is estimated that about seven percent of people in the United States have diagnosed or undiagnosed TBI. Dr. Gordon and his team from the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Mount Sinai plan to conduct research using the screening tool in other populations as well. The researchers are using BISQ to assess TBI in the prison population in Texas to determine how the condition may contribute to criminality.

The software is $15.00. For more information visit http://www.mssm.edu/research/centers/traumatic-brain-injury-central.

January 7, 2011 Posted by | Health News Items, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , | Leave a comment

Long-lasting chemicals flooding wastewater treatment plants threaten the environment and human health

Long-lasting chemicals flooding wastewater treatment plants threaten the environment and human health

Rolf Halden is a researcher at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University.

 

From a December 21, 2010 Eureka news release

Every hour, an enormous quantity and variety of manmade chemicals, having reached the end of their useful lifespan, flood into wastewater treatment plants. These large-scale processing facilities, however, are designed only to remove nutrients, turbidity and oxygen-depleting human waste, and not the multitude of chemicals put to residential, institutional, commercial and industrial use. So what happens to these chemicals, some of which may be toxic to humans and the environment? Do they get destroyed during wastewater treatment or do they wind up in the environment with unknown consequences?

New research by Rolf Halden and colleagues at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University seeks to address such questions. The group’s results, reported recently in the Journal of Environmental Monitoring,*** suggest that a number of high production volume (HPV) chemicals—that is, those used in the U.S. at rates exceeding 1 million pounds per year, are likely to become sequestered in post-treatment sludge and from there, enter the environment when these so-called biosolids are deposited on land.

As Halden notes, over 4000 chemicals in common usage in the U.S. qualify as HPV chemicals, the vast majority of which have never been evaluated in terms of exotoxicity (their potential to adversely affect ecosystems), or for the risks they may pose to humans. “With each of these compounds, we are engaged in an experiment conducted on a nationwide scale,” says Halden; “Odds are, some of these chemicals will turn out to be bad players and will pose problems for ecosystems, public health or both.”

Unfortunately, it is neither technically nor economically feasible to perform the kind of detailed analyses necessary to declare this vast swirl of chemicals safe for humans or environmentally benign following wastewater treatment. Instead, Halden’s efforts are aimed at narrowing the field of potentially troublesome chemicals, by defining traits likely to cause some chemicals to persist in the environment. To do this, the group applied a new empirical model for estimating the fraction of mass loading of chemicals in raw sewage expected to endure in digested sludge.

Chemicals which become sequestered in digested sewage sludge are a potential cause for concern in part because the treated sludge is often subsequently applied to land, including land designated for agricultural use. Halden’s group screened some 207 HPV chemicals, using a model that predicted that two thirds of these compounds are likely to accumulate in digested sludge to greater than fifty percent of their initial mass loading in raw sewage. Eleven of these chemicals were flagged as compounds of special concern and deemed potential hazards to human and environmental health.

Three principal criteria dictated the selection of these problem chemicals: (a) their propensity to accumulate and persist in sludge in large amounts (b) structural characteristics suggestive of environmental persistence on land following biosolids recycling, and (c) unfavorable ecotoxicity threshold values, whether these have been experimentally determined or were forecasted with computer models.

As Halden explains, certain classes of chemicals possess physical characteristics that make them likelier to resist breakdown during wastewater treatment. Of particular concern are hydrophobic organic chemicals. As their name implies, such chemicals are ‘afraid’ of water and preferentially attach themselves to particulate matter, thereby becoming part of the primary and secondary sludge. This characteristic trait limits the availability of hydrophobic chemicals to aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms during sewage treatment and sludge digestion.

Rather than being broken down, such chemicals can become enriched in municipal biosolids by several orders of magnitude. Through this process, substances in heavy usage, like HPV chemicals, can accumulate as pollutants in municipal sludge to parts per million (ppm) concentrations. “It’s like vacuum cleaning your home,” says Halden. “When the carpet is clean, the vacuum bag holds a concentrated burden of dirt. By anology, the generation of biosolids enriched in non-biodegradable pollutants are the price you pay when purifying domestic sewage for water reuse.”

In order to better gauge which chemicals may go on to present human health and environmental risks following sequestration in sludge, the group conducted a computer or in silico analysis. The method provides a streamlined and economically attractive means of isolating those chemicals deserving more in-depth field analysis. The group applied a new empirical model able to predict the fraction of total mass of a hydrophobic chemical likely to persist in biosolids after wastewater treatment.

Another advantage of the new model, applied by Halden and Assistant Professor Randhir Deo from the University of Guam, is simplicity. The model only requires two input values in order to estimate a chemical’s environmental persistence. The chemicals to be screened were taken from the High Production Volume Information System database maintained by the EPA to monitor the environmental fate of chemicals produced in amounts exceeding 1 million pounds per year.

The empirical model was developed and tweaked to produce the best agreement between the mathematical framework based on a given chemical’s physical properties and actual measurements derived from large sewage treatment plants. The physical characteristic found to play the largest role in a chemical’s persistence in sludge was its sorption potential—the tendency of molecules of the chemical to adhere to the surface of other molecules. In the case of the HPV chemicals under consideration, high sorption values among hydrophobic chemicals caused them to stick to other particles and be sequestered from the degradative processes used to treat wastewater.

The bulk of the chemicals included in the HPV study were used for industrial purposes and included antidegradants, antioxidants, metal chelators, intermediates, by-products, catalysts, flame retardants, phenylating agents, plasticizers, heat storage and transfer agents, lubricants, solvents, anticorrosive agents, and others. The study also identified five mass-produced chemicals used as flavors and fragrances that were predicted to persist in sludge in fifty percent or greater amounts of their initial mass loading in raw sewage.

Once chemicals likely to persist in sludge were identified, estimates of their toxicity were examined. Those with high persistence levels and high environmental toxicity made the enemies list of chemicals posing the greatest potential hazard. Prominent among the toxic chemicals were the so-called organohalogen compounds, seven of which were found to accumulate in substantial quantity in treated sludge and displayed half-lives in soil estimated to range from 120 to 360 days.

Perhaps of greatest concern are halogenated chemicals known as organobromines—popular ingredients in a range of flame retardant products, which have subsequently been identified in bird tissues, in egg pools of herring gulls, and in dust samples. Halden insists that better monitoring of just such chemicals is essential for understanding their trajectory and mitigating risks to human health and the environment.

“Our work is directed at identifying problematic compounds before they cause harm to the environment and people. Environmental chemists often can foretell adverse outcomes. What’s lacking are regulations to translate that knowledge into pollution prevention,” says Halden. “Cleaning up after the fact, is costly and hard to do.”

Some related informational links

  • Environmental Health and Toxicology (specialized information services from the US National Institutes of Health and US National Library of Medicine)
    • HazMap -an occupational toxicology database designed to link jobs to hazardous job tasks which are linked to occupational diseases and their symptoms. It is a relational database of chemicals, jobs and diseases.
    • ToxNet – Databases on toxicology, hazardous chemicals, environmental health, and toxic releases
    • Household Products Databases – This database links over 8,000 consumer brands to health effects from Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) provided by the manufacturers and allows scientists and consumers to research products based on chemical ingredients
    • and many more databases..
  • Toxicology Web links from NIH & NLM (extensive list of govt, non-govt, and international Web sites)
  • Toxicology Resources especially for the public (from NIH and NLM), including ToxTown and ToxMap

***For suggestions on how to get this article for free or at low cost, click here


January 3, 2011 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Consumer Health, Consumer Safety, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Medical and Health Research News, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , , | Leave a comment

10 of the Top Health Apps for Consumers & Professionals in 2010

From the ePharma Summit blog item

A lot has changed over the course of 2010 in the apps that HCP’s and Patients use to divulge health information. Many are continuing to get on the Mobile “Bandwagon” for the first time this year alone thanks to innovations in Smartphones and new portable tablets.

Here are 10 popular apps you should consider:

1. Medscape Medscape tops our list as the number one free medical app for medical professionals. The amount of free content provided by Medscape is absolutely mind boggling and seems to continuously grow with each update. 7,000+ drug references, 3,500+ disease clinical references, 2,500+ clinical images and procedure videos, robust drug interaction tool checker, CME activities, and more.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/05/medscape-iphone-medical-app-review

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/medscape/id321367289?mt=8

2. Micromedex This might come as a surprise to many, but after you use this prescription medical reference app you’ll understand why it ranks so high. The overall user interface of the app is simple and quick. There is minimal clutter — another reason for such a high ranking. If you need to look up a dose or some quick reference information about a drug you can accomplish this with ease.

There are no prompts to register your e-mail address, no CME activities, no icon badges, no notifications, or any other distractions. The one knock on this app is it doesn’t have a robust drug interaction checker, something Medscape and Epocrates provide. On the flip side, for residents and medical students, the app does a better job than other drug reference apps when it comes to mechanism of action information and patient teaching information. Another plus is it’s available for the iPad — which is not true of Epocrates and Medscape.

The application is a production of Thomson Reuters, a legitimate name in Healthcare.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/micromedex-drug-information/id390211464?mt=8

3. New England Journal of Medicine The NEJM app is clearly a must have for all health care professionals. The caveat is that when this app was released the NEJM stated it would be free for a “limited time” in the iTunes description — that was more than 5 months ago and the app still remains free, allowing you to access fantastic NEJM content customized for the mobile format. The app allows you to access the last 7 days worth of published articles, along with images of various medical conditions and videos on how to perform procedures such as LPs and chest tubes.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/06/new-england-journal-of-medicine-iphone-app-free-content/

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nejm-this-week/id373156254?mt=8

4. Epocrates There is no denying Epocrates is one of the best medical reference tools in the mobile format. The free version of Epocrates, Epocrates Rx, provides great content: Drug monographs and health plan formularies, drug interaction tool, pill identifier, medical Calculator, and a new addition: Medical News and handpicked clinical articles.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/02/epocrates-app-review-iphone-medical-app-ipod-touc/

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/epocrates/id281935788?mt=8

5. MedCalc MedCalc once again makes it into our top free medical apps list. The creators of MedCalc have updated the app multiple times, making its user interface more robust and continuously adding medical formulas. It’s been downloaded more than a mind numbing 700,000 times, making it one of the most popular medical apps for the iPhone. The creators of the app are medical professionals and it was one of the first medical calculators to hit the iOS App Store with the introduction of the iPhone.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2009/06/medcalc-v12/

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/medcalc-medical-calculator/id299470331?mt=8

6. WebMD Mobile This is a free app, which helps patients to diagnose their condition, using a symptom checker. You simply enter your symptoms and the app gives you a diagnosis. There is also a first aid section, which covers everything from minor cuts to heart attacks. The app also offers information about suitable treatments

http://www.webmd.com/mobile

7) iPregnancy This is a useful application for pregnant women; it has a range of pictures of the developing baby and contains a wealth of information about pregnancy. The app also has a tool to keep track of antenatal appointments.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ipregnancy-pregnancy-app/id295598816?mt=8

8) Blood pressure This app tracks blood pressure and can be used to keep a record of blood pressure over a set time period. The app can be utilized by multiple users and is easy to use. This app is ideal for those who have high blood pressure but can be beneficial for everyone, as there are often no obvious symptoms of high blood pressure.

http://www.apple.com/webapps/calculate/bloodpressure.html

9) Glucose Buddy

The Glucose Buddy app is a really useful tool for diabetics; it helps to keep track of blood sugar levels.

http://www.glucosebuddy.com/glucose_buddy_app

10) iPharmacy

iPharmacy enables you to look up medications and treatments and look for dosage instructions, side-effects and information about different drugs. The app also has information about drug interactions so you can find out about taking medications with other types of drug.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ipharmacy-the-drug-medication/id348702163?mt=8

Doctors are taking to iPhone, BlackBerry and smartphone apps. According to the 2009 MDsearch.com Smartphone Survey, 53% of physician respondents own a smartphone and 63% of those physicians are using mobile medical applications. Like it or not apps are here to stay. I truly think they will help 98% of the time both as a reference or a quick way to get updated information about any topic.

December 28, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , | 2 Comments

Herbs at a Glance: A Quick Guide to Herbal Supplements

 

 

Herbs at a glance: a quick guide to herbal supplements is a 100 page indexed PDF document which gives the basics on the most common herbs in dietary supplements – historical uses, what they are used for now, scientific evidence on effectiveness, and potential side effects.

It is published by the US National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCAAM).
The NCAAM Web site includes links to information under titles as

A few related Web sites

and a related news item…

From the December 16, 2010 Health Day news item U.S. Spending Millions to See if Herbs Truly Work

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) — People have been using herbal supplements for centuries to cure all manner of ills and improve their health. But for all the folk wisdom promoting the use of such plants as St. John’s wort and black cohosh, much about their effect on human health remains unknown.

But the federal government is spending millions of dollars to support research dedicated to separating the wheat from the chaff when it comes to herbal supplements.

“A lot of these products are widely used by the consumer, and we don’t have evidence one way or the other whether they are safe and effective,” said Marguerite Klein, director of the Botanical Research Centers Program at the U.S. National Institutes of Health. “We have a long way to go. It’s a big job.”

In August, the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the Office of Dietary Supplements awarded about $37 million in grants to five interdisciplinary and collaborative dietary supplement centers across the nation. The grants were part of a decade-long initiative that so far has awarded more than $250 million toward research to look into the safety and efficacy of health products made from the stems, seeds, leaves, bark and flowers of plants.

Reliance on botanical supplements faded in the mid-20th century as doctors began to rely more and more on scientifically tested pharmaceutical drugs to treat their patients, said William Obermeyer, vice president of research for ConsumerLab.com, which tests supplement brands for quality.

But today, herbal remedies and supplements are coming back in a big way. People in the United States spent more than $5 billion on herbal and botanical dietary supplements in 2009, up 22 percent from a decade before, according to the American Botanical Council, a nonprofit research and education organization.

The increase has prompted some concern from doctors and health researchers. There are worries regarding the purity and consistency of supplements, which are not regulated as strictly as pharmaceutical drugs.

“One out of four of the dietary supplements we’ve quality-tested over the last 11 years failed,” Obermeyer said. The failure rate increases to 55 percent, he said, when considering botanical products alone.

Some products contain less than the promoted amount of the supplement in question — such as a 400-milligram capsule of echinacea containing just 250 milligrams of the herb. Other products are tainted by pesticides or heavy metals.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned supplement makers on Dec. 15 that any company marketing tainted products could face criminal prosecution. The agency was specifically targeting products to promote weight loss, enhance sexual prowess or aid in body building, which it said were “masquerading as dietary supplements” and in some cases were laced with the same active ingredients as approved drugs or were close copies of those drugs or contained synthetic synthetic steroids that don’t qualify as dietary ingredients.

But even when someone takes a valid herbal supplement, it may not be as effective when taken as a pill or capsule rather than used in the manner of a folk remedy. For example, an herb normally ground into paste as part of a ceremony might lose its effectiveness if prepared using modern manufacturing methods, Obermeyer said.

“You move away from the traditional use out of convenience, and you may not have the same effect,” he said.

Researchers also are concerned that there just isn’t a lot of evidence to support the health benefits said to be gained from herbal supplements. People may be misusing them, which can lead to poor health and potential interactions with prescription drugs.

“Consumers often are taking them without telling their doctor, or taking them in lieu of going to the doctor,” Klein said……

 

 

December 22, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Finding Aids/Directories, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Medical and Health Research News, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

HHS issues new strategic framework on multiple chronic conditions

From the December 14 2010 US Health and Human Services news release

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today issued its new Strategic Framework on Multiple Chronic Conditions― an innovative private-public sector collaboration to coordinate responses to a growing challenge.

More than a quarter of all Americans ― and two out of three older Americans ― have multiple chronic conditions, and treatment for these individuals accounts for 66 percent of the country’s health care budget. These numbers are expected to rise as the number of older Americans increases.

The health care system is largely designed to treat one disease or condition at a time, but many Americans have more than one ― and often several ― chronic conditions. For example, just 9.3 percent of adults with diabetes have only diabetes, according to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). And as the number of chronic conditions one has increases, so, too, do the risks of complications, including adverse drug events, unnecessary hospitalizations and confusion caused by conflicting medical advice.

The new strategic framework ― coordinated by HHS and involving input from agencies within the department and multiple private sector stakeholders ― expects to reduce the risks of complications and improve the overall health status of individuals with multiple chronic conditions by  fostering change within the system; providing more information and better tools to help health professionals  ― as well as patients ― learn how to better coordinate and manage care; and by facilitating research to improve oversight and care.

“Individuals with multiple chronic conditions deserve a system that works for them,” said Assistant Secretary for Health Howard K. Koh, MD, MPH. “This new framework provides an important roadmap to help us improve the health status of every American with chronic health conditions.”

The management of multiple chronic conditions has major cost implications for both the country and individuals. Increased spending on chronic diseases is a key factor driving the overall growth in spending in the Medicare program. And individuals with multiple chronic conditions also face increased out-of-pocket costs for their care, including higher costs for prescriptions and support services.

“Given the number of Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions, focusing on the integration and coordination of care for this population is critical to achieve better care and health for beneficiaries, and lower costs through greater efficiency and quality,” said Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Donald Berwick, MD.

The Affordable Care Act, with its emphasis on prevention, provides HHS with exciting new opportunities to keep chronic conditions from occurring in the first place and to improve the quality of life for patients who have them.

“We need to learn rapidly how to provide high quality, safe care to individuals with multiple chronic conditions.  AHRQ’s investments assess alternative strategies for prevention and management of chronic illness, including behavioral conditions, in persons with varying combinations of chronic illnesses,” said AHRQ Director Carolyn M. Clancy, MD.

HHS has taken action in recent months to improve the health of individuals with multiple chronic conditions. Some examples include:

AoA and CMS jointly announced $67 million in grants to support outreach activities that encourage prevention and wellness, options counseling and assistance programs, and care transition programs to improve health outcomes in older Americans.

  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

AHRQ awarded more than $18 million dollars (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) in two categories of grant awards to understand how to optimize care of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  • Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)

As part of an existing $40 million ASPE contract, the National Quality Forum is undertaking a project to develop and endorse a performance measurement framework for patients with multiple chronic conditions.

CDC is supporting a new project ― Living Well with Chronic Disease: Public Health Action to Reduce Disability and Improve Functioning and Quality of Life ― in which the Institute of Medicine will convene a committee of independent experts to examine the burden of multiple chronic conditions and the implications for population-based public health action.

CMS has provided recent guidance to State Medicaid directors on a new optional benefit available Jan. 1, 2011, through the Affordable Care Act, to provide health homes for enrollees with at least two chronic conditions, or for those with one chronic condition who are at risk for another.

  • Food and Drug Administration/ Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (FDA/ASPE)

FDA and ASPE launched a study to examine the extent to which individuals with multiple chronic conditions are being included or excluded from clinical trials for new therapeutic products.

  • Indian Health Service (IHS)


IHS has expanded its Improving Patient Care Program to nearly 100 sites across the tribal and urban Indian health system to assist in improving the quality of health care for patients with MCC.

NIH has committed $42.8 million for a study to determine whether efforts to attain a lower blood pressure range in an older adult population will reduce other chronic conditions.

SAMHSA awarded $34 million in new funding to support the Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration Program, which seeks to promote the integration of care with people with co-occurring conditions.

For more information about the new HHS Strategy on Multiple Chronic Conditions, go to:http://www.hhs.gov/ash/initiatives/mcc/

 

 

December 21, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items, Medical and Health Research News, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Free Databases from the US Government

The Pollak Library California State University Fullerton has published a list of Free Databases from the US Government.
This item came via the Yahoo group NetGold, and was published by the owner Librarian David P. Dillard
Here are the the links to free Health and Medicine resources.

[Flahiff’s note: MedlinePlus is a great starting point for consumer level health/medical information. It goes beyond news to give great starting points for information on diseases and conditions. It includes videos (as surgeries), links to directories (as hospital and physician directories), options for email alerts, Twitter, and much more.

Drugs @ FDA is a great source, however, the NLM Drug Information Portal is a more comprehensive resource. This portal includes both consumer level and professional level drug information resources, including Drugs@FDA, MedlinePlus resources, and references from scientific journals as well as toxicology resources.

PubMed is the largest indexer of health/medical articles written by scientists, physicians,and other health care related professionals. Not all of the articles are available for free online. Please click here for suggestions on how to get individual health/medical articles for free or low cost.]

  • PLoS: Public Library of Science
    Full text. PLoS publishes peer-reviewed, open access scientific and medical journals that include original research as well as timely feature articles. All PLoS articles are immediately freely accessible online, are deposited in the free public archive PubMed Central, and can be redistributed and reused according to the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
  • Cancer Literature in PubMed
    Search the Cancer subset in PubMed.
  • Drugs@FDA
    Search by drug name, active ingredient, application number, and more.
  • PillBox Beta

    Aids  in the identification of unknown solid dosage pharmaceuticals using images to identify pills (color, shape, etc) as well as a separate advanced search (imprint, drug manufacture, ingredients, etc)

  • Household Products Database
    Health and safety information on householdproducts.
  • MedlinePlus
    Health news on 800 topics on conditions, diseases, and wellness.
  • National Academies Press
    Full text books on behavioral and social sciences, biology, computers, earth sciences, education, energy, engineering, environmental issues, food and nutrition, health and medicine, industry and labor, math, chemistry, physics, space and aeronautics, transportation, and more.
  • National Library of Medicine: Databases
    Linds to databases and electronic resources from the NIH.
  • NLM Gateway
    From NIH. Accesses Medline, PubMed, Toxline, DART, ClinicalTrials.gov, and other government databases.
  • NLM/NIH Resources
    Links to NLM, NIH and other federal government resources.
  • Nutrient Data Laboratory Database
    The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) has the responsibility to develop USDA’s National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference,  the foundation of most food and nutrition databases in the US, used in food policy, research and nutrition monitoring.
  • Nutrient Data Laboratory [USDA]
    Search by keywords to retrieve nutrient data.
  • PubMed
    More than 19 million citations to biomedical articles from MedLine and life science journals. Some links to full text.
  • PubMed Central
    Full text  articles from PubMed, the free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literataure.

December 21, 2010 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Consumer Health, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Finding Aids/Directories, Health Education (General Public), Health Statistics, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Atlas of the Human Body from the American Medical Association & Additional Anatomy Links

Atlas of the Human Body from the American Medical Association

Includes simple and clearly labelled diagrams of the circulatory system, the brain, the torso, the female reproductive system, and others.  Summaries of systems and related information. Each diagram and rendering contains a brief discussion of the system in question, along with a selection of related information on the left-hand side of the page. The section titled “Effects of Stroke” is quite effective, and this site will be a useful resource for the general public, medical professionals, and others working in related fields.

Side view of the torso


Other Online Human Body Atlases***

GetBodySmart – An Online Textbook about Human Anatomy and Physiology

“Visually Learn About the Human Body Using Our Interactive Animations”
Meant to supplement McGraw Hill Higher Education physical textbooks. Includes interactive animations and additional resources as quizzes and fact sheets. IPad compatible versions

BioDigitalHuman

A virtual 3D body that brings to life “thousands of medically accurate anatomy objects and health conditions in an interactive web-based platform.” Hundreds of interactive features and customized views that look through all of the body systems .Annotated Screenshots area save and share these powerful tools for use in a range of settings. While the Basic version is completely free, there are other levels of functionality available for a fee

Gray’s Anatomy 

The classic illustrated text of human anatomy (20th edition, 1918) is now available online. It is fully searchable by keyword, table of contents, or subject index containing 13,000 entries. From Bartleby.com.
InnerBody: Your Guide to Human Anatomy Online ***

“The place for fun, interactive and educational views of the human body.” You can explore human anatomy through illustrations, animation, tutorials, and descriptions.

Human Anatomy On-line 

“Human Anatomy On-line, the place for fun, interactive and educational views of the human body. This program contains over one hundred illustrations of the human body with animations and thousands of descriptive links.”

Google Body Browser

“layered, interactive, high resolution experience allows users to zoom, pan, rotate, the human body, and to visualize its organs, systems, bones, and muscles.”[From Google launches Body Browser/joycevalenz]

Human Anatomy

http://www.upstate.edu/cdb/education/grossanat/

Designed for first year medical students, useful for others taking biology related courses. Material arranged in  six sections ranging from extremities to the head and neck. Each area contains a variety of detailed anatomical charts, glossaries, and images.  Each section includes many radiology resources for different perspective of the human body through x-rays, CT scans, and MRIs. Other helpful resources include fact sheets, quizzes, teaching materials, and other freely available course materials offered from other medical schools.  State University of New York-Upstate Medical University [KMG]

Animated Anatomies 

Animated Anatomies explores the visually stunning and technically complex genre of printed texts and illustrations known as anatomical flap books. These publications invite the viewer to participate in virtual autopsies, through the process of unfolding their movable leaves, simulating the act of human dissection. This exhibit traces the flap book genre beginning with early examples from the sixteenth century, to the colorful “golden age” of complex flaps of the nineteenth century, and finally to the common children’s pop-up anatomy books of today.”

A collection of  games, videos, and other multimedia excursions. Created by Australian science teacher Ben Crossett. Games here include jigsaw puzzles, crosswords, word searches, and the catch all Just For Fun.

Anatomy Resources (American Association of Anatomists) includes these and many more

Human Anatomy Learning Site 

From the Dartmouth Medical School, the Human Anatomy Learning Web Site is a work in progress, focusing on the needs of first-time students of human anatomy. Its aim is to help students learn clinically relevant anatomy with maximum efficiency.

Anatomy and Physiology Learning Modules

From the University of Minnesota.A collection of study aids for entry-level anatomy and physiology students. Self Tests  Inquiry, Ideas, Thoughts, Learning, Curriculum.

Pocket Body iPhone app (Google Chrome Biodigital Human)

The BioDigital Human is a 3D platform for the understanding of anatomy, disease and treatments.Interactive tools for exploring, dissecting, and sharing custom views, combined with detailed medical descriptions.

*** There are only a limited number of free comprehensive online human body atlases online.
If these do not fit your needs, consider going to a nearby public, academic, or medical library.

Many academic and medical libraries are open to the public (all libraries receiving state funding are open to the public). Don’t forget to ask for a reference librarian if you would like professional assistance!

Many academic and medical libraries provide at least some reference assistance to the public. Call ahead and ask about library services to the public. You may be pleasantly surprised.

As always, feel free to contact me by leaving a comment ( it will not be posted). Or email me at jmflahiff, currently residing at her yahoo dot com account.

I would be happy to search for an image or information meeting your needs. Will reply within 48 hour.

 

December 18, 2010 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

New Look for NLM® and the New York Academy of Medicine Resource Guide Web Site

December 6, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , | Leave a comment

A New Look and Feel for the PubMed Central® Public Access Page

Since 2005,  scientists and researchers who receive NIH research are required by law to make their research findings (in medical or scientific journals) freely available to the public.

These freely available full text articles are largely available through PubMed Central.
PubMed Central is a free electronic collection of medical, biomedical, biology, and life sciences literature developed and maintained by US government agencies. PubMed Central is a subset of PubMed, the largest collection of biomedical article citations and abstracts in the world.

PubMedCentral articles have unique identifiers (article reference numbers) referred to as PMIDs.

The news item below describes how PubMed Central (PMC) is making it easier to locate articles with PMCIDs.

 

From the National Library of Medicine (NLM) November 30th Technical Bulletin item

The PubMed Central (PMC) Public Access & PMC page, available from the sidebar on the About PMC page, was recently updated to provide greater clarity and usability. Two new features were added:

  • Top-of-the-page links to navigate page content
  • A table for locating article reference numbers

New Location for Navigation Links

The Public Access & PMC page was reorganized and links to the page content are now at the top of the page (seeFigure 1). The new design makes it easy to see what the page contains and how to find the answers to your Public Access-related questions.

We’ve Got Your NumbersAdditionally, a new table (see Figure 2) demonstrates all the ways to locate the identification number of an article or manuscript — whether you’re looking for a PubMed identifier (PMID), NIH Manuscript Submission identifier (NIHMSID) , or perhaps most important, the PMC identifier (PMCID), which is the identification number that must be cited by recipients of NIH funding to demonstrate compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy. As seen in the table below, you can find these numbers through viewing the PubMed abstract; a PMC search result; and in the PMC display for the final, published article or the author manuscript. To reach this table click on the question, “How can I find a PMCID, NIHMSID, and PMID?

 

Screen capture of Table for finding article reference numbers

 

To see more of the article, click here.

An earlier posting includes PMC as one of a few suggestions to obtain free and low cost medically-related articles.
Click here for the posting.

 

 


December 6, 2010 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Healthy People 2020 sets health promotion, disease prevention agenda for the nation

Healthy People.gova mother and her child

From the Healthy People about page

Healthy People provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For 3 decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to:

  • Encourage collaborations across sectors.
  • Guide individuals toward making informed health decisions.
  • Measure the impact of prevention activities.

Healthy People 2020 strives to:

  • Identify nationwide health improvement priorities.
  • Increase public awareness and understanding of the determinants of health, disease, and disability and the opportunities for progress.
  • Provide measurable objectives and goals that are applicable at the national, State, and local levels.
  • Engage multiple sectors to take actions to strengthen policies and improve practices that are driven by the best available evidence and knowledge.
  • Identify critical research, evaluation, and data collection needs.

The 40+  2020 topics and objectives include

December 4, 2010 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Should we be teaching information management instead of evidence-based medicine?

From the full text article at the publisher’s Web site

[via a Medlib-L posting on November 29, 2010 by Julie Esparza, Clinical Medical Librarian, LSU]

Shepard R. Hurwitz1 and David C. Slawson2

(1) Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7055, USA
(2) University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Shepard R. Hurwitz
Email: shurwitz@abos.org
Published online: 22 May 2010

Abstract
Background
To encourage high-quality patient care guided by the best evidence, many medical schools and residencies are teaching techniques for critically evaluating the medical literature. While a large step forward in many regards, these skills of evidence-based medicine are necessary but not sufficient for the practice of contemporary medicine and surgery. Incorporating the best evidence into the real world of busy clinical practice requires the applied science of information management. Clinicians must learn the techniques and skills to focus on finding, evaluating, and using information at the point of care. This information must be both relevant to themselves and their patients and be valid.
Where are we now?
Today, orthopaedic surgery is in the post-Flexner era of passive didactic learning combined with the practical experience of surgery as taught by supervising experts. The medical student and house officer fill their memory with mountains of facts and classic references ‘just in case’ that information is needed. With libraries and now internet repositories of orthopaedic information, all orthopaedic knowledge can be readily accessed without having to store much in one’s memory. Evidence is often trumped by the opinion of a teacher or expert in the field.
Where do we need to go?
To improve the quality of orthopaedic surgery there should be application of the best evidence, changing practice where needed when evidence is available. To apply evidence, the evidence has to find a way into practice without the long pipeline of change that now exists. Evidence should trump opinion and unfounded practices.
How do we get there?
To create a curriculum and learning space for information management requires effort on the part of medical schools, residency programs and health systems. Internet sources need to be created that have the readily available evidence-based answers to patient issues so surgeons do not need to spend all the time necessary to research the questions on their own. Information management is built on a platform created by EBM but saves the surgeon time and improves accuracy by having experts validate the evidence and make it easily available.
Each author certifies that he or she has no commercial associations (eg, consultancies, stock ownership, equity interest, patent/licensing arrangements, etc) that might pose a conflict of interest in connection with the submitted article. Dr. Slawson is a paid consultant for Wiley & Son publisher.

November 30, 2010 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , | Leave a comment

Books with New Looks: The Bookshelf Redesign

NLM Technical Bulletin

National Library of MedicineNational Institutes of Health

 

 

 

From a November 24, 2010 US National Library of Medicine (NLM) Technical Bulletin Announcement

The books in Bookshelf have been given a new look as part of a redesign that is taking place in several stages. The Bookshelf redesign goes beyond cosmetic enhancements; it includes infrastructural improvements to facilitate the discovery of information at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).

The first (and completed) stage is the redesign that improves how all book pages are displayed. The table of contents page of every book now displays the book’s bibliographic data, such as the book title, author, publisher, and copyright information. A thumbnail display of the book cover shows prominently and an abstract or excerpt from the book is displayed above the table of contents. On the right side of the page, related PubMed® citations and history of recent activity may display (see Figure 1). Where available, links to other NCBI resources, such as Gene and OMIM, may also display. These new panels mark the ongoing work to create rich links between NCBI resources and to maximize discoverability of related materials.

In common with PubMed, the blue NCBI header and search bar are displayed at the top of all pages, and at the bottom of each page the standard NCBI footer links to many NCBI resources. Click on “Bookshelf” (upper left on any page) to return to the homepage.

Once inside a book, all pages have been given a more balanced and clean layout. The text of the page is more readable through improved page layout, typography, and standardized headings. Figures can be quickly previewed: a large version of the image pops up over the page when you mouseover the thumbnail (see Figure 2). Clicking on the thumbnail opens the image in a new window and allows you to see the title and caption for the figure……

 


November 28, 2010 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , | Leave a comment

Resource Guide for Public Health Preparedness has a new look and new web address

From an NLM-TOX-ENVIRO-HEALTH-L NOTICE ( a US National Library of Medicine listserv)

The Resource Guide for Public Health Preparedness has a new look and new
web address, http://phpreparedness.nlm.nih.gov. It is now a featured
resource on the Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC)
web site, http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov.

The Resource Guide was first developed by the New York Academy of Medicine
Library in 2002 with funding from the National Library of Medicine (NLM)
National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care
Technology (NICHSR). The Guide is now jointly funded by NICHSR and DIMRC.
The Guide continues to provide access to no-cost web materials on public
health preparedness topics for the public health workforce.

Recently, this database and web site moved to NLM and the content
continues to be maintained by the New York Academy of Medicine Library.
Previous web addresses will automatically take the user to the new web
address. Comments and questions about the Resource Guide may be sent to
tehip@teh.nlm.nih.gov<mailto:tehip@teh.nlm.nih.gov> .

[Editor Flahiff’s note: There does not seem to be any browse feature, there is, however, a Site map and search feature.

November 27, 2010 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

AMA Released Guidelines for Physicians and Social Media

From the  November 22,2010 AMA news item AMA meeting: Proceed with caution on social media tools

Doctors should be responsible in their communications and regularly track their online presence, the AMA advises.
By CAROLYNE KRUPA, amednews staff. Posted Nov. 22, 2010.

San Diego — Social networking websites and blogs can be an effective and efficient way to communicate, but the AMA is advising physicians and medical students to proceed with caution.

Physicians writing blogs or using Facebook, Twitter and other social media should be responsible in their communications, routinely monitor their online presence, use security settings to limit access to personal information and abide by patient privacy laws, according to a policy approved at the Interim Meeting.

“Using social media can help physicians create a professional presence online, express their personal views and foster relationships, but it can also create new challenges for the patient-physician relationship,” said AMA Board of Trustees Member Mary Anne McCaffree, MD.

A recent Google study found that 86% of U.S. physicians use the Internet in their professional careers to gather health and medical information. Most doctors also use the Internet for personal communications beyond the workplace.
It’s important to maintain appropriate doctor-patient boundaries and separate professional and personal content online, according to the policy. Physicians should be mindful that their online communications are searchable, long-lasting and available to millions of people, said Julia Halsey, student member of the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs.

Though the Internet can foster a feeling of anonymity, doctors should not post anything that could have negative professional repercussions, delegates said. The policy advises professional self-regulation and reminds physicians to be cognizant of their obligations to patients and not do anything to jeopardize patient privacy or confidentiality.

On social networking websites, physicians should use privacy settings to block their information from public view, but they need to recognize that those settings may not completely or permanently prevent outside access, the policy says.

Careful communication
Physicians are cautioned against having nonclinical communications with patients, because doctors may see something about a patient online that could have implications for their medical care. In the report that led to the policy, CEJA members gave the example of a photo posted online of a patient smoking, when the patient had told the physician he or she was a nonsmoker.

Seeing the photo and knowing the patient may not have been truthful could affect how the physician interacts with the patient in subsequent visits.

It is part of a physician’s professional obligation to monitor the Internet for their own content, as well as content posted about them or colleagues, said Clifford Moy, MD, a psychiatrist from Austin, Texas, and a delegate for the Texas Medical Assn.

Some delegates expressed concern about a recommendation for physicians to approach colleagues they believe have posted unprofessional content online.

It shouldn’t be a doctor’s obligation to police the online activities of colleagues, said John Fagg, MD, a plastic surgeon from Winston-Salem, N.C., and a delegate of the North Carolina Medical Society.

But Kavita Shah, MD, a resident member of CEJA from Chicago, said physicians have the public’s trust and should take that responsibility seriously. The policy recommendation is no different from existing standards that physicians report colleagues for unprofessional behavior they witness, she said.

“Physicians must recognize that actions online and content posted may negatively affect their reputations among patients and colleagues, may have consequences for their medical careers [particularly for physicians-in-training and medical students], and can undermine public trust in the medical profession,” the CEJA report said.

November 24, 2010 Posted by | Professional Health Care Resources | Leave a comment

UNFPA Launches New Online Database, Country Profiles to Track Progress in Maternal and Reproductive Health

From the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) news item

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has recently launched MDG 5b+ Info, an online database system designed to track global progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other related indicators of maternal health at the country level. Adapted from the UN-endorsed DevInfo database system, MDG 5b+ Info compiles the latest relevant household survey data with international data and allows for easy generation of tables, graphs and maps for inclusion in presentations, reports and advocacy materials.

The MDG 5b+ Info database contains data on sexual and reproductive health indicators drawn from national Demographic and Health Surveys and other MDG indicators at the global, national and sub-national levels, where available. The MDG 5b+ Info database is published online by UNFPA at www.devinfo.info/mdg5b,  providing worldwide access to this important dataset. Policy makers and planners are encouraged to access the data to support evidence-based decision making on issues related to maternal and reproductive health.

November 20, 2010 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Health News Items, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

(With Video!) Invention helps students learn surgical techniques before operating on patients

From a November 19, 2010 Eureka news alert

FORT COLLINS – In the last 50 years, modern medicine has made astounding advances in surgery, yet many of today’s veterinary and human medicine students still hone basic surgical and suturing skills on carpet pads and pig’s feet before transitioning to a live patient. An invention by Colorado State University veterinarians provides students with artificial body parts that look, feel, behave, and even bleed just like real skin, muscles and vessels.

The artificial replicas of sections of human and animal bodies — such as an abdominal wall — give students a realistic learning environment that will bridge the gap between classroom lectures and procedures such as surgical cuts and sutures on real human or animal patients.

“It is a significant, stressful leap for medical and veterinary students from the classroom to the surgery suite,” said Dr. Dean Hendrickson, a veterinarian and director of CSU’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital and one of the inventors. “Industry standards for training sometimes actually teach incorrect techniques, or skills that don’t translate into real-world situations, so students don’t have the ability to realistically prepare for surgery before a live patient. These artificial simulations help students master their technique, dexterity and confidence before they operate for the first time on a person or someone’s pet.”

The artificial tissues consist of layers of silicone that closely simulate skin, connective tissue and muscle. Built into the silicone are realistically placed and sized “blood vessels” that are connected to an artificial blood source that supplies the tissue with realistic bleeding. For example, students practicing sutures will experience blood coming into a wound or incision from both sides of the tissue at realistic locations and rates.

Some models are colored realistically, such as a brown-skinned abdominal wall of a horse, with white layers and red layers representing muscles and tissues. However, students also may use simulated tissue in translucent material so they can better view and understand, for example, suture patterns from a three-dimensional perspective while learning correct stitches.

“Our hope is that, with this model, we can begin to help students build better skills that will make for better outcomes,” said Dr. Fausto Bellezzo, a co-creator of the technology with Hendrickson. Bellezzo is also a veterinarian and researcher at CSU’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

The creators are working with CSU Ventures to identify investors and partners to advance development of the model for teaching animal and human medicine. CSU Ventures is a subsidiary corporation of the Colorado State University Research Foundation, a private, non-profit foundation that helps the university move technologies from the university into the commercial sector. The foundation has filed a provisional patent for the technology.

###
Colorado State University’s Animal Teaching Hospital is part of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

A video illustrating this model is available on CSU’s YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILV-tI1hdA8.

November 20, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items, Professional Health Care Resources | , , | Leave a comment

CDC Learning Connection: A gateway to public health learning products

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently established the CDC Learning Connection.

These free public health learning products include podcasts, e-learning, electronic publications, and live events.

The Learning Connection home page allows one to search/browse by topic, media (as podcasts), and title.

A sampling of current products

Help a Hurting Heart (A Minute of Health with CDC) [podcast]

STD Self Study Model – Gonorrhea

Immunizations and Vaccines (textbooks, flyers, manuals, posters, stickers, buttons and many more publication types)

November 20, 2010 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , | Leave a comment

Access to Health Care (CDC Vital Signs Web page)

CDC Vital Signs

The recent CDC (US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)  page Access to Health Care provides general information about health insurance coverage.

Here is the summary

New 2010 estimates show that the number of Americans without health insurance is growing, affecting middle-income Americans as well as those living in poverty. About 50 million adults 18–64 years old had no health insurance for at least some of the past 12 months. People in all income brackets have been affected, not just adults living in poverty, according to a 2009 survey. In the past few years, the number of adults aged 18–64 who went without health insurance for at least part of the past 12 months increased by an average of 1.1 million per year. About half of those additional adults were middle-income.* Adults without consistent health insurance are more likely to skip medical care because of cost concerns, which can lead to poorer health, higher long-term health care costs, and early death.

*About $43,000–$65,000 household income for a household of four

This Web page includes the following links

  • Learn about your role in expanding access to health care, with tips for employers, health care providers, and everyone
  • Latest Findings with a summary of current health insurance coverage statistics
  • Who’s at Risk with a chart on the relationship between disability and health care insurance coverage
  • What can be done with tips for employers, health care providers, and everyone

November 18, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , | Leave a comment

FDA Warning Letters issued to four makers of caffeinated alcoholic beverages

three drink cans: Green HG Core High Gravity , Orange HG Core High Gravity, Lemon Lime Core Spikeda bottle of Moonshotsix drink cans of Four Loko in various colors

 

fourteen drink cans in various colors showing Joose and Max products

From a Nov 17, 2010 US Food and Drug Administration press release

For Immediate Release: Nov. 17, 2010
Media Inquiries: Michael Herndon, 301-796-4673, michael.herndon@fda.hhs.gov
Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA

FDA Warning Letters issued to four makers of caffeinated alcoholic beverages
These beverages present a public health concern

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today warned four companies that the caffeine added to their malt alcoholic beverages is an “unsafe food additive” and said that further action, including seizure of their products, is possible under federal law.

The companies receiving Warning Letters and their products are:

• Charge Beverages Corp.: Core High Gravity HG, Core High Gravity HG Orange, and Lemon Lime Core Spiked
• New Century Brewing Co., LLC: Moonshot
• Phusion Projects, LLC (doing business as Drink Four Brewing Co.): Four Loko
• United Brands Company Inc.: Joose and Max

FDA’s action follows a scientific review by the Agency.  FDA examined the published peer-reviewed literature on the co-consumption of caffeine and alcohol, consulted with experts in the fields of toxicology, neuropharmacology, emergency medicine, and epidemiology, and reviewed information provided by product manufacturers.  FDA also performed its own independent laboratory analysis of these products.

“FDA does not find support for the claim that the addition of caffeine to these  alcoholic beverages is ‘generally recognized as safe,’ which is the legal standard,” said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, Principal Deputy Commissioner.  “To the contrary, there is evidence that the combinations of caffeine and alcohol in these products pose a public health concern.”

Experts have raised concerns that caffeine can mask some of the sensory cues individuals might normally rely on to determine their level of intoxication.  The FDA said peer-reviewed studies suggest that the consumption of beverages containing added caffeine and alcohol is associated with risky behaviors that may lead to hazardous and life-threatening situations.

The agency said the products named in the Warning Letters are being marketed in violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FFDCA). Each Warning Letter requests that the recipient inform the FDA in writing within 15 days of the specific steps that will be taken to remedy the violation and prevent its recurrence. If a company does not believe its products are in violation of the FFDCA, it may present its reasoning and any supporting information as well.

If the FDA believes that the violation continues to exist, the agency may pursue an enforcement action that could include seizure of the products or an injunction to prevent the firm from continuing to produce the product until the violation has been corrected.

FDA’s action today follows a November 2009 request to manufacturers to provide information on the safety of adding caffeine to their products.

FDA is aware that on November 16, Phusion Projects, LLC, the maker of Four Loko, announced its intention to remove caffeine and other stimulants from its drinks.  FDA views this announcement as a positive step. FDA has not yet heard officially from the company about this announcement, including how quickly it will remove present product from circulation and how quickly it will reformulate its product.  FDA intends to work with Phusion Projects, LLC and the other manufacturers to assure their products meet safety standards.

For More Information:

 

November 18, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Professional Health Care Resources | , | Leave a comment

Health Care Reform Law – Informational Web Sites

From recent postings at Medlib-L, a discussion list for medical librarians about informational sources for the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act (the Health Care Reform Law)


MedlinePlus Trusted Health Information for You

  • Health Insurance (MedlinePlus, published by US National Institutes of Health)
    Links to health care reform Web sites include

HealthCare.govTake health care into your own hands


Economic Stimulus for the Healthcare IT Industry

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Web sites I discovered through my parish’s Pax Christi meetings

Faithful Reform (http://www.faithfulreform.org/) with an email sign up…and easily found links to…

  • “A Daily Dose of Truth” [currently 9 items, including the titles Medicare in Health Care Reform, The Requirement to Buy Insurance,The “R” word (Rationing), Small Business]

  • Resources [currently includes items as  A Moral Vision for our Health Care Future, Power Point presentation: The Heart in Health Care Reform ]

Herndon Alliance: Healing America’s Healthcare (http://herndonalliance.org/) with an email sign up…and the tabs (links)

  • The Resources tab includes talking point suggestions that can be used in discussions with others as well as mass communication and writing to representatives
  • The Newsletter tab includes links to past Messages of the Week

A few journal/magazine articles (from Medlib-L postings)

** For suggestions on how to get free/low cost medical articles, go to How to obtain free/low cost medical articles in medical and scientific journals

November 18, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , | Leave a comment

Online Health Education Collection at McGill University

From the Health Education Collection About Page.

The Health Education Collection published by the McGill University Health Centre contains patient education resources used by healthcare professionals at the MUHC.  [ It also contains resources for Health Professional continuing education / professional development]

This includes reliable and up-to-date information about diseases and conditions, medical procedures and tests, disease prevention and health promotion in general.

This collection includes:

  • Full-text documents created by health care professionals at the McGill University Health Centre.
  • Links to full-text documents created by other reliable organizations on the World Wide Web.
  • Information about resources that are available on-site at the MUHC affiliated hospitals.

There are three ways to search for information in this collection:

  • Quick Search – simply enter your search terms and choose a language.
  • Advanced Search – enter your search terms or search specifically by title or publisher and then limit by language, document type or department origin and even limit to MUHC publications only.
  • Health Topics – look through the list of subjects to find everything available on a particular subject.

Present Feature Resources include My Diabetes and Me and We Care About Your Pain.

The 50+ Health Topics include Arthritis, Hepatitis, Nutrition, and Surgery.

November 18, 2010 Posted by | Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , | Leave a comment

Adding pharmacists to docs’ offices helps patient outcomes, study shows

From a November 15, 2010 Eureka news alert

Adding pharmacists to the primary care team right in doctors’ offices may help patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes better manage associated risks, a new University of Alberta study had found. The blood pressure of patients with Type 2 diabetes dropped significantly when pharmacists were included in the on-site clinical examination and consulting process, the U of A study showed. Among 153 patients whose hypertension was inadequately controlled at the beginning of the study, the 82 who had advice from a pharmacist were more likely to reach blood pressure treatment targets recommended by the Canadian Diabetes Association. As well, the study showed that with input from pharmacists, the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease for patients with Type 2 diabetes will drop by three per cent. The results were reported online by Diabetes Care, and are scheduled to appear in the January 2011 issue of the journal. The study can currently be found online at http://diabetes.org/diabetescare. “Pharmacists can play a more active role in primary care and community clinics,” said Scot Simpson, lead author of the study. “We’ve already been actively collaborating on health care teams for years in hospitals.” Placing pharmacists in the doctor’s office instead of in a more traditional role at the neighbourhood pharmacy allows for a more collaborative frontline approach to medication management in primary care, Simpson said. “The doctors, nurses and pharmacists can directly discuss issues specific to any one patient, and by doing so, have the best outcome for the patient.” High blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors are common in people with diabetes, so effective management of medications is key to helping reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke, Simpson added. ### For more information on the study contact: Scot Simpson, associate professor Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences University of Alberta 780-492-7538 ssimpson@pharmacy.ualberta.ca

/blockquote>

November 16, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items, Professional Health Care Resources | , , | Leave a comment

HHS Offers New Tool for Medical School Students to Learn, Detect Medicare Fraud

From a November 8, 2010 US Health and Humans Services (HHS) news release

The Department of Health & Human Service’s Office of Inspector General has released a new tool geared toward educating medical school students on Medicare and Medicaid fraud and abuse laws, according to a news report byThe Hill.

The tool is a booklet, titled “Roadmap for New Physicians: Avoiding Medicare and Medicaid Fraud Abuse,” that will be delivered to medical schools across the country. The booklet covers education on specific fraud and abuse laws and physician relationships with payors, other providers and vendors.

The booklet’s release follows an OIG report that suggested medical school students aren’t adequately trained on healthcare fraud law.

Read The Hill‘s news report about the OIG’s “Roadmap for New Physicians: Avoiding Medicare and Medicaid Fraud Abuse.”

Read other coverage about healthcare fraud reports:

– WSJ: AMA Keeping Data on Physicians and Individual Healthcare Providers Confidential

– Report: Number of Suspected New York Medicaid Fraud Cases Doubled Since Last Year

November 15, 2010 Posted by | Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , | Leave a comment

NLM announces MedlinePlus Connect

From a posting by  GMRLIST – email list for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-Greater Midwest Region (NN/LM-GMR) members. Written by Samanthi Hewakapuge, MA, MLS, Consumer Health Coordinator

Today NLM [US National Libraries of Medicine) announces MedlinePlus Connect (http://medlineplus.gov/connect), a free service that allows electronic health records (EHR) systems to link users to MedlinePlus (http://medlineplus.gov), an authoritative up-to-date health information resource for patients, families and health care providers. MedlinePlus provides information about conditions and disorders, medications, and health and wellness.

MedlinePlus Connect accepts requests for information on diagnoses (problem codes) and medications. NLM mapped MedlinePlus health topics to two standard diagnostic coding systems used in EHRs: ICD-9-CM and SNOMED CT CORE Problem List Subset.

When an EHR submits a request to MedlinePlus Connect, the service returns the closest matching health topic as a response.  MedlinePlus Connect also links EHR systems to drug information written especially for patients. For medication codes, MedlinePlus Connect accepts RXCUIs and NDCs. The API for using this service conforms to the HL7 Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (Infobutton) Knowledge Request URL-Based Implementation specification.

MedlinePlus responds to problem code requests in either English or Spanish. Currently, it supports requests for drug information in English only.  NLM is working on adding laboratory test responses to MedlinePlus Connect. We will also support an XML-based Web service at a future date.

You can find more background and technical information at http://medlineplus.gov/connect. If you are an EHR owner or developer interested in staying up-to-date on technical developments with MedlinePlus Connect, or talking to other organizations that are using it, join the free email list athttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/emaillist.html. To send questions or feedback, use the MedlinePlus Contact Us link athttp://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/contact/index.cfm.


 

November 10, 2010 Posted by | Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Infant Mortality and Pregnancy Loss (Knowledge Path and Resources for Families)

From GMRLIST is an email list for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-Greater Midwest Region (NN/LM-GMR) members, this item written by Samanthi Hewakapuge, MA, MLS, Consumer Health Coordinator


The Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University released a new edition of the knowledge path, Infant Mortality and Pregnancy Loss.  The knowledge path directs readers to resources that analyze data, report on research aimed at identifying causes and promising intervention strategies, and describe risk-reduction efforts as well as bereavement-support programs. Separate sections present resources about factors that contribute to infant mortality and pregnancy loss: birth defects, injuries, low birthweight and prematurity, preconception and pregnancy, and safe sleep environments.

The knowledge path was created for health professionals, policymakers, researchers, and families. View the path online at  http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/kp_infmort.html. A resource brief for families accompanies the knowledge path and is available at http://www.mchlibrary.info/families/frb_infmort.html.

November 10, 2010 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , | Leave a comment

Psychologists identify influence of social interaction on sensitivity to physical pain

From a November 8, 2010 University of Toronto news release

TORONTO, ON – Psychologists at the University of Toronto have shown that the nature of a social interaction has the ability to influence an individual’s sensitivity to physical pain. The discovery could have significant clinical implications for doctor-patient relationships and the general well-being of an individual on a daily basis.

“Dozens of studies over the past several decades have demonstrated the impact of inadequate social connectedness on numerous health outcomes, including cardiovascular health, immune function, post-surgical recovery, and lifespan,” says Terry Borsook, a PhD student in the Department of Psychology at U of T and author of a new study published in PAIN. “Our study is among the first to show in humans that the perception of physical pain can be immediately impacted by the types of social experiences that people have in their everyday lives.”

In the study, healthy participants rated the intensity and unpleasantness of painful stimuli before and after engaging in a structured interaction with a trained actor who was instructed to be either warm and friendly or indifferent throughout the exchange. Participants who experienced the indifferent social exchange reported less sensitivity to pain after the interaction when compared to that measured before the exchange. Participants exposed to the positive social interaction, however, exhibited no change in pain sensitivity….

….

“If such everyday mildly unpleasant encounters are enough to provoke pain inhibition, then this suggests that many people may be exposed to chronic fight-or-flight responses, which can have many negative implications for health. This would be the case especially for people who are sensitive to social exclusion, such as those who feel lonely or fear rejection”

Borsook says that the results also have important clinical implications when it comes to seeing your doctor. “Health practitioners who are aloof, lack understanding, or are generally unresponsive to patients may provoke an analgesic response resulting in underestimated reports of pain, with insufficient pain control measures being a possible consequence.”

The findings are presented in a paper titled “Mildly negative social encounters reduce physical pain sensitivity“, published in the November issue of PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain.

Editor Flahiff’s note: Click here to for ways to get this article for free or low cost

 

November 9, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Get Smart : Know When Antibiotics Work

The US Centers for Disease Control publishes a wealth of information about antibiotics for consumers, health practitioners, and the media.

Topics include appropriate antibiotic use, dangers of antibiotic resistance, and an antibiotic quiz.

Information for Everyone includes both print and online materials, fact sheets, and Q and A’s.

Information for Healthcare Providers includes Treatment Guidelines, Patient Education Materials, and Continuing Education materials.

November 8, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Health Education (General Public), Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources, Public Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

International variation in the usage of medicines

A review of the literature

From a Rand Corporation item by Ellen Nolte, Jennifer Newbould, Annalijn Conklin

The report reviews the published and grey literature on international variation in the use of medicines in six areas (osteoporosis, atypical anti-psychotics, dementia, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease/lipid-regulating drugs (statins), and hepatitis C).

We identify three broad groups of determinants of international variation in medicines use:

(1) Macro- or system level factors: Differences in reimbursement policies, and the role of health technology assessment, were highlighted as a likely driving force of international variation in almost all areas of medicines use reviewed. A related aspect is patient co-payment, which is likely to play an important role in the United States in particular. The extent to which cost-sharing policies impact on overall use of medicines in international comparison remains unclear.

(2) Service organisation and delivery: Differences in access to specialists are a likely driver of international variation in areas such as atypical anti-psychotics, dementia, and rheumatic arthritis, with for example access to and availability of relevant specialists identified as acting as a crucial bottleneck for accessing treatment for dementia and rheumatoid arthritis.

(3) Clinical practice: Studies highlighted the role of variation in the use and ascertainment methods for mental disorders; differences in the use of clinical or practice guidelines; differences in prescribing patterns; and reluctance among clinicians in some countries to take up newer medicines.

Each of these factors is likely to play a role in explaining international variation in medicines use, but their relative importance will vary depending on the disease area in question and the system context.

Free, downloadable PDF file(s) are available below.

Download PDFFull Document(File size 0.4 MB, < 1 minute modem, < 1 minute broadband) 

Download PDFSummary Only(File size 0.1 MB, < 1 minute modem, < 1 minute broadband) 

RAND makes an electronic version of this document available for free as a public service.

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 7.0 or higher for the best experience.

November 2, 2010 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , | Leave a comment

Genetic Testing Web Site

The US National Human Genome Institute (NHGRI) **publishes Genetic Testing, which serves as an introduction to non-scientists from a research perspective.

The Web site Genetic Testing includes the following

 

**[ From About the Insitute ]NHGRI’s  initial mission was to map the human genome.  Its role has been expanded to include applying genome technologies to the study of specific diseases and study the genetic components of complex disorders. Its human genome sequence database is available to scientists worldwide.

The NHGRI Web site includes information about

 

October 29, 2010 Posted by | Health Education (General Public), Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , | Leave a comment

Hospital Preparedness Checklist for Pandemic Influenza

Hospital Preparedness Checklist for Pandemic Influenza (with a 2009 focus)  aims to help “enhance the readiness of the health facilities to cope with the challenges of an epidemic, a pandemic or any other emergency or disaster, hospital managers need to ensure the initiation of relevant generic priority action. [The document]  aims to provide a checklist of the key action to carry out in the context of a continuous hospital emergency preparedness process.”

This 32 page PDF document includes checklists in the areas of incident command, communication, continuity of essential services, surge capacity, human resources, logistics, and supply management (including pharmaceuticals), infection prevention and control, case management, surveillance, and laboratory services.

 

October 28, 2010 Posted by | Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , | 1 Comment

Communication in Cancer Care

Communication in Cancer Care is a PDQ (Physician Data Query) summary** which outlines good communication skills among patients, family members, and health care providers. Good communication in all phases of cancer care contributes to the well being of the patient and improves quality of life.

The Communication in Cancer Care Web site has a patient version, a health professional version, and a Spanish language version.

The patient version addresses issues as the roles of family givers and parents, how to talk with the health care team (including the importance of checklists and record keeping)
and where to find more information on communicating effectively in cancer care settings.

The health professional version outlines factors and outcomes related to communicating effectively, how to communicate effectively in cancer care settings, and information on training programs and clinical trials.

On a related note, this is an example of why good communication is important in cancer care…

The Perils of Taking Experimental Cancer Drugs [Reuters Health, Oct 26,2010, by Frederik Joelving]

[Excerpt]

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Trying a new, experimental cancer drug may offer a glimpse of hope for very sick patients, but often does more harm than good, a new study shows.

Researchers said cancer doctors regularly resort to drugs still undergoing testing, as long as they have been approved for other diseases or in different combinations or doses.

But because the science is still up in the air, nobody really knows what the consequences of taking such drugs are.

“Many of these drugs end up not being the tremendous improvement that we hoped they would be,” said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, who was not involved in the new study.

“People need to realize that because the trials have not been completed there is a great deal that is not known about the treatments,” he told Reuters Health. “There are people who get these treatments and get hurt.”

The new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, looked at 172 clinical trials published over two years. [Editor Flahiff’s note : Ask a reference librarian at a local public, academic, or medical library for availability and if any fee is involved]

Less than a third of the clinical trials showed the experimental drugs improved patient survival, and less than half found the drugs helped other clinical outcomes…..

……

Sometimes, of course, new drugs do work, and no one argues that doctors shouldn’t be allowed to prescribe medications they think will help patients.

But doctors should be very clear about the high risks involved. One way to do that, said Peppercorn, would be to require that cancer doctors get informed consent from patients before they start them on experimental drugs.

In the end, Brawley said, the decision to use such treatment should be left to the patient and his or her doctor.

“There are times when it can be justified,” he noted, “but it is done far more often than it should be.”

 

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**PDQ is an online database developed and maintained by the National Cancer Institute. Designed to make the most current, credible, and accurate cancer information available to health professionals and the public, PDQ contains peer-reviewed summaries on cancer treatment, screening, prevention, genetics, complementary and alternative medicine, and supportive care; a registry of cancer clinical trials from around the world; and directories of physicians, professionals who provide genetics services, and organizations that provide cancer care. Most of this information, and more specific information about PDQ, can be found on the NCI’s Web site athttp://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq. Also called Physician Data Query.

October 28, 2010 Posted by | Health Education (General Public), Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Online Continuing Medical Education (CMEList.com) for Physicians

Are you a physician looking for listings of reviewed CMEs?
A great first place to look is CMEList.com, by Bernard Skalr, MD.
The home page has listings by specialty, cross-specialty, and comprehensive board review.

From the CME list about page

It is the intent of CMEList.com to describe every web site that offers AMA-approved CME online. At this time, we have over 300 sites listed. These sites offer over 16,000 separate activities and over 22,000 hours of credit. If you find errors in the descriptions please let me know. If you know of CME web sites that I have missed, please tell me about them.

Some general statements and explanations about how the sites are chosen and described:

  • I have included every American online CME site I could find that offers CME accredited under the supervision of  the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). The only sites deliberately excluded are those where I was unable to view any instruction (or a demo) without advance payment and those sites which require an offline subscription of a journal and offer only the quiz online.
  • In most cases, the entire process (viewing the CME, taking the tests, submitting payment when required and receiving an electronic certificate of CME credit) can be done online. Where forms must be mailed or faxed or payment submitted by mail, I have so indicated.
  • Passwords and registration: this is required at just about every site; I do not describe the registration process unless it is especially onerous or confusing. The site managers want to know who is visiting, and your registration is how they find out. Usually you can register without making any financial commitment.
  • I include courses only when CME credit is still available.
  • Fees: In general, you can view instruction without cost; the cost figures I give are how much it costs to have your credits certified. Where you need to pay for viewing, I have stated that.
  • The “new1123b.gif” icon means that I had not seen the site before now, or that there have been major changes or reorganization since my last visit to the site.
  • Occasionally the same instruction may be found at several different sites. I have tried to show it only once, at the creator’s site. When this is not possible, I have indicated that the same instruction is found at different sites.
  • Online CME sites change often; new sites appear; existing sites disappear. Please email me with comments or suggestions. If you know of any online CME site which is not included, please let me know. And please let me know about any broken links.
  • Be sure to add this site to your bookmarks or favorites folder.
  • To view the most up-to-date version, refresh (reload) this page in your browser.

 

 

October 19, 2010 Posted by | Professional Health Care Resources | , | Leave a comment

APA Releases New Guidelines on the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

Excerpts from an American Psychiatric Association press release (Oct 1, 2010)

ARLINGTON, Va. (Oct. 1, 2010) – The American Psychiatric Association has released a new clinical practice guideline for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder.  This guideline updates a previous version published 10 years ago and includes new evidence-based recommendations on the use of antidepressant medications, depression-focused psychotherapies, and somatic treatments such as electro-convulsive therapy. The guideline addresses other topics as well, including alternative and complementary treatments, the treatment of depression during pregnancy, and strategies for treatment-resistant depression.

A few key changes to the guidelines include:

Rating Scales: The guideline recommends potentially using a clinician- and/or patient- administered rating scale to assess the type, frequency, and magnitude of psychiatric symptoms in order to tailor the treatment plan to match the needs of the particular patient.

New Strategies for Treatment-Resistant Depression: The guideline explains that electro-convulsive therapy has the strongest data supporting it as a treatment for patients who do not respond to multiple medication trials. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and vagus nerve stimulation have also been added as potential treatments for these patients. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, known as MAOIs, are also an option.

Exercise and Other Healthy Behaviors: The guideline cites randomized, controlled trials that demonstrate at least a modest improvement in mood symptoms for patients who engage in aerobic exercise or resistance training. Regular exercise may also reduce the prevalence of depressive symptoms in the general population, with specific benefit found in older adultsand individuals with co-occurring medical problems.

•Maintenance Treatment Recommendation Strengthened: The guideline recommends that after the continuation phase, maintenance treatment should be considered, especially for patients with risk factors for recurrence. Maintenance treatment should definitely be provided for patients with more than three prior depressive episodes or chronic illness.

October 9, 2010 Posted by | Professional Health Care Resources | , | Leave a comment

Military suicide prevention efforts fail: report & related items from a military health Web site

Excerpts from a Reuters news item

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Efforts to prevent suicides among U.S. war veterans are failing, in part because distressed troops do not trust the military to help them, top military officials said on Thursday.

Poor training, a lack of coördination and an overstretched military are also factors, but a new 76-point plan lays out ways to improve this, Colonel John Bradley, chief of psychiatry at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, told a conference.

Each branch of the services — the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines — rushed to create a suicide prevention program, but there was no coördination. The report recommends that the defense secretary’s office take over coördination of suicide prevention efforts.

On-the-ground prevention training often failed because those running the sessions did not understand their importance, Bradley said.

“They are mocked and they are probably harmful,” he said.

According to the report, available at http://www.health.mil/dhb/default.cfm, 1,100 servicemen and women committed suicide in 2005 to 2009 — one suicide every day and a half. The Army’s suicide rate doubled in that time.

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Librarian Karen Estrada publishes Milhealth’s Directory of Military Health Information
Her recent postings on military suicides

**Complex Puzzle of Military Suicides: Is it Really? (a personal observation)

**Shoulder to Shoulder: I Will Never Quit on Life posting at the site’s home page

SOURCES

http://www.army.mil Army releases new video to combat suicides. 17 July 2010. By Alexandra Hemmerly-Brown. Available at:    http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/07/17/42436-army-releases-new-video-to-combat-suicides/?ref=news-home-title0 [Accessed 19JUL2010].

http://www.army.mil. Shoulder to Shoulder: DA civilian training. July 15, 2010. Available at: http://www.army.mil/media/amp/?bctid=115348558001 [Accessed 19 July 2010].

National Institutes of Health. MedlinePlus, the Magazine. Winter 2010. Preventing Suicides in the Military. pp 5-6. Available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/pdf/MLP_Winter_2010.pdf [Accessed 19 July 2010].

Related News Items

(RAND Corporation) Suicide rates in the US military have increased sharply since 2001 as the nation fights two wars. A new study sponsored by the Department of Defense finds that military officials should improve efforts to identify those at-risk and improve both the quality and access to behavioral health treatment to combat the problem. Needed changes include promoting the advantages of using behavioral health care and assuring that service members can receive help confidentially.


September 26, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Finding Aids/Directories, Health News Items, Librarian Resources, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Authoritative, Current Health Information Available on Mobile Devices

Looking for health information while at the doctor’s office, pharmacy, or elsewhere when all you have is a mobile device?

The following mobile Web sites & resources from the US National Library of Medicine may just provide the information you are looking for.

**MedlinePlus Mobile provides information on over 750 diseases, conditions, and wellness areas. It also provides drug information and links to health news items.

**PubMed® for Handhelds Web site is a website for searching MEDLINE® with the web browser of any mobile device.
MEDLINE® is the largest database of  scholarly biomedical citations/abstracts in the world. Links to the full text of most articles are by subscription only. Check with your local library on how to get full text of articles not available at PubMed®.

**Wireless System for Emergency Responders (WISER)****** is a software program for Palm Powered or Pocket PC devices to assist first responders in hazardous material incidents.

**NCBI Bookshelf downloadable versions of books from the NCBI Bookshelf for any mobile device.
From the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

******March 22 2011 WISER update from the National Library of Medicine (via their NLM-TOX-ENVIRO-HEALTH-L listserv)

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) 4.4 is now available. It can be downloaded to the WISER Windows, Pocket PC, and SmartPhone platforms from the WISER Web site.   http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/

The updated online version, WebWISER, is available at  http://webwiser.nlm.nih.gov/getHomeData.do

Highlights of this version include:

1) A new, interactive Chemical Reactivity capability (WISER for Windows); users can
a) Create their own mix of chemicals.
b) See an overview of the resulting potential hazards
c) Delve into the detailed reaction behind each hazard or gas produced.

2) 19 new substances and mixtures of substances, including Crude Oil and the Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 dispersants.

Find more information at http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/whats_new_4_4.html
WISER for iPhone/iPod touch 1.1 is now available from Apple’s App Store.

All WISER platforms now include:

1) The 19 new substances and mixtures of substances.

2) Data updates based on the latest information from the NLM Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs).

3) Many usability improvements and fixes.

You can follow the activity of the National Library of Medicine Specialized Information Services Division via Twitter (NLM_SIS). http://twitter.com/NLM_SIS

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May 14, 2010 Posted by | Consumer Health, Professional Health Care Resources | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment