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General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblogged Infographic] Concussed – Masters in Health Care

Concussed | Masters in Health Care.

From Concussed at Masters in Health Care

Any sort of injury, from a little scrape to a serious bone-break, is a nuisance. But some types of injuries are far more traumatizing to deal with than others. If you or a loved one has ever had the misfortune to suffer from a concussion, you know that this particular injury can be highly painful, lingering, and difficult to deal with. Concussions can be the result of many varying accidents, and they happen more frequently than many people realize. There are 3.8 million concussions in the US every year, and many of them happen as a result of youth sports-related injuries. In the past, concussions were often dismissed to the tune of “walk it off,” and concussed individuals typically didn’t receive the proper treatment. In recent years, however, the true danger of any sort of concussion, from serious to mild, has become more widely recognized among healthcare professionals. Concussions can have a longer, more lingering effect than many people previously realized, and the legacy left by a severe concussion is something medical professionals are seeing more and more in the world of sports. A great deal of NFL players, for instance, are more aware of concussion symptoms, as well as how these symptoms may play out later in life. You may not be a head-injury prone athlete, but if you have any loved ones who are involved in contact sports, the following infographic provides helpful insight into the medical field’s growing awareness of the danger of a concussion.

 

Concussion Infographic

 

 

December 18, 2012 Posted by | Consumer Health, Consumer Safety | , | Leave a comment

Quick, Simple Test Can Detect Concussion in Athletes

Quick, Simple Test Can Detect Concussion in Athletes

Screening superior to other sideline tests in spotting early signs of brain trauma, researchers say

HealthDay news image

 

 

From the February 13, 2011 Health Day news item by Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) — A quick, simple test done on the sidelines of sports events can accurately detect concussion in athletes, a new study says.

The screening — known as the King-Devick test — is superior to current sideline tests that can fail to assess a wide range of brain functions, according to the researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

For this test, athletes are asked to read single digit numbers on index-sized cards. Normally, it takes about one minute. Any increase in the time needed to complete the test suggests the athlete has suffered a concussion, particularly if the delay is more than five seconds longer than the athlete’s baseline test time.

The researchers said the test can detect impairments in eye movement, attention, language and other symptoms of concussion. This study of 39 boxers found that test times improved an average of one second for those who didn’t experience head trauma, but worsened 11.1 seconds for those who did suffer head trauma and 18 seconds for those who were knocked out.

The study appears online in the journal Neurology.

“This rapid screening test provides an effective way to detect early signs of concussion, which can improve outcomes and hopefully prevent repetitive concussions,” senior author Dr. Laura Balcer, a professor of neurology, ophthalmology and epidemiology, said in a university news release.

“If validated in future studies, this test has the potential to become a standard sideline test for athletes,” she added.

SOURCE: University of Pennsylvania, news release, Feb. 2, 2011

 

 

 


February 15, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health, Health News Items | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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