Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Why Is the Federal Government Afraid of Fat? [Reblog]

Why Is the Federal Government Afraid of Fat?
F
rom a July 2015 post at Medication Health News

The New York ID-100303054Times has recently shared an interesting piece with their readers. Since 1980’s Dietary Guidelines and Federal food policies recommended limiting dietary fat in the American diet to less than 30% of a daily caloric intake. This recommendation has remained active since and is still used in the Nutrition Facts panel on all packaged foods. A number of recent studies of low-fat diets revealed no significant benefits in major cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer risk and weight gain. In fact, the only research that suggested a reduction in these conditions related to a Mediterranean-style diet with a higher 40% of total fat intake. Additionally, a harmful increase in the consumption of refined carbohydrates has occurred over the past several decades. For the first time the advisory committee for the 2015 Dietary Guidelines omitted the upper limit on total fat, focusing the recommendation on promoting healthy food consumption and improving the food quality rather than concentrating on the total fat content. In your opinion, is an average American ready to abandon the low-fat trend?

For additional information please read The NewYork times

Image courtesy of [Stuart Miles]/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

July 20, 2015 Posted by | Nutrition | , , | Leave a comment

[News article] Amount, types of fat we eat affect health, risk of disease with an AND Opinion Piece

Screen Shot 2014-01-22 at 6.10.29 AM

Amount, types of fat we eat affect health, risk of disease.

Screen Shot 2014-01-22 at 5.40.26 AMHealthy adults should consume between 20 percent and 35 percent of their calories from dietary fat, increase their consumption of omega-3 fatty acids, and limit their intake of saturated and trans fats, according to an updated position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics**.

Read the entire article here

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**An aside about corporate sponsorship at the academy. The Current corporate sponsors include companies which make “junk” food in addition to healthier products.
A recent non mainstream article questions how the academy can not be influenced  by these corporations, including their advice to the public.
The academy does publish Guidelines for Corporate Relations Sponsors  which include

  • Fit with Academy strategic goals
  • Scientific accuracy
  • Conformance with Academy positions, policies and philosophies
  • Academy editorial control of all content in materials bearing the Academy name
  • Clear separation of Academy messages and content from brand information or promotion
  • No endorsement of any particular brand or company product
  • The inclusion of relevant facts and important information where their omission would present an unbalanced view of a controversial issue in which the sponsor has a stake
  • Full funding by the sponsor of all direct and indirect costs associated with the project

Ultimately, it is up to the individual to accept or not accept findings with the academy.
I’ve gathered some great online sites on how to evaluate health information. 

Have to say that I have found some of the information at the academy very useful.
For example, their peer reviewed Consumer and Lifestyle App Reviews in the areas of weight management, diabetes, and gluten free products. But even with the apps, it is good to check on who created them and is sponsoring them.

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January 22, 2014 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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