Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

City Street Pollution Reduced By Up To 8 Times More Than Previously Believed By Green Plants

 

 From the 22 July 2012 article at Medical News Today

Trees, bushes and other greenery growing in the concrete-and-glass canyons of cities can reduce levels of two of the most worrisome air pollutants by eight times more than previously believed, a new study has found. A report on the research appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology. ..

..The study concluded that judicious placement of grass, climbing ivy and other plants in urban canyons can reduce the concentration at street level of NO2 by as much as 40 percent and PM by 60 percent, much more than previously believed. The authors even suggest building plant-covered “green billboards” in these urban canyons to increase the amount of foliage. Trees were also shown to be effective, but only if care is taken to avoid trapping pollutants beneath their crowns…

 

 

July 23, 2012 Posted by | Public Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Washing machines as source of plastics pollution

It all comes out in the wash

From the report…
It seems that household washing machines appear to be a major source of so-called “microplastic” pollution — bits of polyester and acrylic smaller than the head of a pin — that scientists now have detected on ocean shorelines worldwide. Their report describing this potentially harmful material was published in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology.
Mark Browne and colleagues explain that the accumulation of microplastic debris in marine environments has raised health and safety concerns. The bits of plastic contain potentially harmful ingredients which go into the bodies of animals and could be transferred to people who consume fish. Ingested microplastic can transfer and persist into their cells for months.
How big is the problem of microplastic contamination? Where are these materials coming from? To answer those questions, the scientists looked for microplastic contamination along 18 coasts around the world and did some detective work to track down a likely source of this contamination.
They found more microplastic on shores in densely populated areas, and identified an important source — wastewater from household washing machines. They point out that more than 1,900 fibers can rinse off of a single garment during a wash cycle, and these fibers look just like the microplastic debris on shorelines.
The problem, they say, is likely to intensify in the future, and the report suggests solutions:
“Designers of clothing and washing machines should consider the need to reduce the release of fibers into wastewater and research is needed to develop methods for removing microplastic from sewage.”
For more information go to: http://bit.ly/vJ92Em


November 23, 2011 Posted by | Public Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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