Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Report] Investing in the Health of Young Adults

From the 30 October 2014 Institute of Medicine Report

Young adulthood—ages approximately 18 to 26—is a critical period of development with long-lasting implications for a person’s economic security, health, and well-being.

Recognizing the need for a special focus on young adulthood, the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the Department of Health and Human Services, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the Department of Defense commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) to convene a committee of experts to review what is known about the health, safety, and well-being of young adults and to offer recommendations for policy and research.

The resulting report, Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults, offers federal, state, and local policy makers and program leaders, as well as employers, nonprofit organizations, and other community partners’ guidance in developing and enhancing policies and programs to improve young adults’ health, safety, and well-being. In addition, the report suggests priorities for research to inform policies and programs for young adults.

 

Related report –> 2014 Consumer Health Mindset (Aon Hewitt,)
Excerpt from Full Text Reports

From press release:

A new analysis from Aon Hewitt, the global talent, retirement and health solutions business of Aon plc (NYSE:AON) finds that Millennials put a lower priority on medical care than other generations. However, they are the most likely to want employers to play an active role in supporting their overall health and wellbeing.

The analysis is based on data from the 2014 Consumer Health Mindset report, a joint survey of more than 2,700 U.S. employees and their dependents conducted by Aon Hewitt, the National Business Group on Health and The Futures Company. Aon Hewitt analyzed the perspectives, behaviors and attitudes of employees from different generations towards health and wellness.

According to the analysis, Millennials are the least likely to participate in activities focused on prevention and maintaining or improving physical health compared to other generations. About half (54 percent) have had a physical in the last 12 months, compared to 60 percent of Generation X and 73 percent of Baby Boomers. In addition, just 39 percent say preventive care is one of the most important things to do to stay healthy, compared to 49 percent of Generation X and 69 percent of Baby Boomers.

Millennials are also less likely to participate in a healthy eating/weight management programs (21 percent), compared to Generation X (23 percent) and Baby Boomers (28 percent). Interestingly, they are the most likely generation to engaging in regular exercise (63 percent), compared to 52 percent of Generation X and 49 percent of Baby Boomers.

February 6, 2015 Posted by | Consumer Health, Public Health | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

US Government Program requires drug manufacturers to provide outpatient drugs to eligible health care organizations/covered entities at significantly reduced prices

New to me!

From the US Health Resources and Services Program Web page –  340B Drug Pricing Program & Pharmacy Affairs

The 340B Drug Pricing Program requires drug manufacturers to provide outpatient drugs to eligible health care organizations/covered entities at significantly reduced prices.

The 340B Program enables covered entities to stretch scarce Federal resources as far as possible, reaching more eligible patients and providing more comprehensive services.

Eligible health care organizations/covered entities are defined in statute and include HRSA-supported health centers and look-alikes, Ryan White clinics and State AIDS Drug Assistance programs, Medicare/Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospitals, children’s hospitals, and other safety net providers. See the full list of eligible organizations/covered entities.

To participate in the 340B Program, eligible organizations/covered entities must register and be enrolled with the 340B program and comply with all 340B Program requirements. Once enrolled, covered entities are assigned a 340B identification number that vendors verify before allowing an organization to purchase 340B discounted drugs.

New registrations are accepted October 1-15, January 1-15, April 1-15 and July 1-15.

Update here, which includes..

HRSA is currently working to formalize existing program guidance through regulation, designed to cover a number of aspects of the 340B Program. The regulation currently under development will address the definition of an eligible patient, compliance requirements for contract pharmacy arrangements, hospital eligibility criteria, and eligibility of off-site facilities. We expect to publish this proposed regulation, which will be open for public comment, by June 2014. In order to ensure that covered entities retain flexibility based on their size, structure, and patient population, HRSA will continue to hold covered entities accountable for implementing those requirements as appropriate for their specific circumstances.

…..

Implemenation page includes

Once a covered equity is enrolled in the 340B Program and included in the covered entities database, it is the covered entity’s responsibility to inform wholesalers and manufacturers of enrollment in order to purchase drugs at the 340B discounted price.

Covered entities may continue to work directly with individual wholesalers and manufacturers and may participate in the 340B Prime Vendor Program (PVP). As the government’s awarded 340B Prime Vendor, Apexus is responsible for securing sub-ceiling discounts on outpatient drug purchases and discounts on other pharmacy related products and services for covered entities electing to join the PVP. For complete information, see the Prime Vendor Program .

Implementation Options

HRSA does not specify how participants should implement the 340B Program. As long as participants comply with all 340B Program requirements, they have flexibility in implementing the 340B Program.

Most covered entities choose one or more of the following options:

  • In-House Pharmacy, in which the covered entity owns drugs, pharmacy and license; purchases drugs; is fiscally responsible for the pharmacy; and pays pharmacy staff.
  • Contract Pharmacy Services, in which the covered entity owns drugs; purchases drugs; pays (or arranges for patients to pay) dispensing fees to one or more contract pharmacies; and contracts with pharmacy to provide pharmacy services.
  • Provider/In-House Dispensing, in which the covered entity owns drugs; employs providers licensed in the state to dispense; holds a license for dispensing for the participating providers; and is fiscally responsible for operating and dispensing costs.
  • Alternative Methods Demonstration Project, in which HRSA Office of Pharmacy Affairs approves a model proposed by the covered entity, such as a network of 340B covered entities.

The 340B Database includes links to

 

 

 

 

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February 2, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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