Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Health Data Tools and Statistics on PHPartners.org | Health Information Literacy – for health and well being

From the Blog…Health Data Tools and Statistics on PHPartners.org | Health Information Literacy – for health and well being.

   The following was posted on the BHIC Blog; Sep 11, 2011 10:26 PM by Cheryl Rowan

The Health Data Tools and Statistics page (http://phpartners.org/health_stats.html) on the PHPartners website  (http://phpartners.org) website has been reorganized to make public health data and statistics easier to find and use.

The page has been reorganized so that links to County and Local Health Data now appear at the top of the page. In addition, several new categories have been added.

The Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce (PHPartners) is a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, public health organizations, and health science libraries.

November 18, 2011 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, statistics | , , , | Leave a comment

AHRQ Offers Interactive Tool To Analyze National and State Health Care Data

National Healthcare Quality Report

From the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) press release

Mining for specific data on health care quality and disparities in the U.S.?  It’s an easy process with AHRQ’s NHQRDRnet online query system, which features data from the 2010 National Healthcare Quality Report and the National Healthcare Disparities Report.  At the State and national level, you’ll find quality-of-care data on clinical conditions ranging from asthma and diabetes to heart disease and cancer.  You can review data by specific age groups as well as by race, ethnicity, income, and education.  Using NHQRDRnet’s search tool, you can locate data tables based on selected words, chapters, or type of table.  Select to access AHRQ’s NHQRDRnet system.

Related Link

 

July 5, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mapping the Quality of Care From Hospitals and Doctors

The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourn...

Image via Wikipedia

From the 28 June 2011 Wall Street blog item by Katherine Hobson

How’s the diabetes treatment in Wisconsin? Or the access to after-hours medical care in California?

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has rolled out a new online directory** of 224 health-care quality reports that compare local physicians and hospitals.

The idea is that consumers can get localized, quantitative information on measures such as how often patients in a certain medical practice receive their recommended screening tests or how long mothers typically spend in a given hospital after a cesarean section. The specific measures will vary by report.

Note the emphasis on “quantitative.” These reports, 197 of which cover specific states, all use performance data based on nationally recognized standards on quality and cost. All are freely available. The more subjective picture offered by sites such as RateMDs.com or Yelp aren’t on the map….

…The reports mainly focus on quality; the cost of health-care services is tougher to measure, says Painter. For example, are you looking for the price that would be charged to a patient, the cost breakdown of certain elements of care or something else? Some reports do include cost data; we’ve written separately about sites that tackle the cost issue…

**For example, go to  Comparing Health Care Quality: A National Directory to compare hospital data in Ohio

  • Click on the state of Ohio in the interactive map, then click on View these (Ohio) resources
  • Click on View Report to the left of  the Ohio Department of Health (one higher in the list)
  • Use the options to select counties, hospitals, locations to find out information about one or more hospitals

You can also select one or more quality measures for one or more hospitals (as infection prevention, heart failure, knee
surgery)

Related Resources (from the Comparing section of  the Tulane University Health Management LibGuide***)


———————————————————————————————–
A more general resource for health information and much, much more
Springshare Header
LibGuides are free topic specific guides to Web sites and books by library specialists.

Currently  one can “Search and explore 168,085 guides by 32,658 librarians at 2269 libraries worldwide!”

Library types include academic, public, and K-12.
Have a topic or subject in mind? There is most likely a related library guide in the LibGuide collection.Related articles

Related Articles (for Mapping the Quality of Care from Hospitals and Docs)

June 29, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health, Finding Aids/Directories, health care, Librarian Resources, Public Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

First Glimpse at [Publicly Available] Medical Error Rates Separates the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

From the report by the Sunlight Foundation Reporting Group

By Sarah Dorsey Apr 25 2011 11:28 a.m.

Between Oct. 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010, Medicare patients at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Yonkers, N.Y., suffered thirteen instances of severe bed sores during their stay requiring additional treatment, a rate of nearly 2.9 per 1,000 treated. At St. John’s Riverside Hospital, three miles down Broadway from St. Joseph’s, the rate was 20 times lower: only one severe bed sore was reported, even though St. John’s discharged far more Medicare patients during that period — 8,270 to St. Joseph’s 4,541.

Over the protests of groups like the American Hospital Association, Medicare officials this month publicly revealed for the first time where harmful events like these took place. In addition to bed sores, the data includes information on trauma and falls, infections and the egregious errors known as “never events,” such as patients being given the wrong blood type, or foreign objects being left in the body after surgery.

As many as 98,000 Americans are thought to die annually from medical errors, and about as many succumb to infections they picked up during a hospital stay, according to oft-cited figures released a decade ago, but new research published last week suggests that “adverse events” like these occur about 10 times as frequently as previously thought, in about a third of all hospital stays.

Click on each incident type for a sortable spreadsheet with detailed information on each hospital….

(Clickable Table follows in this report, with additional text)

While the numbers aren’t perfect, they’re a first-ever attempt by Medicare to publicly report patient safety data on individual hospitals. For the first time, the public can get a general idea of how many Medicare patients are sent home with conditions acquired in the hospital.

May 3, 2011 Posted by | Health Statistics, Public Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

New Tutorials from HCUP (US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project)

             Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project logo
HCUP On-line Tutorial Series

HCUP Online Tutorial Series provides HCUP data users with information about HCUP data and tools, and training on technical methods for conducting research with HCUP data.

From the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) press release

HCUP Offers New Online Tutorial Series’ Modules

AHRQ is pleased to announce the release of a new module and an updated re-release of a favorite in the HCUP Online Tutorial Series.  These online trainings are designed to provide data users with information about HCUP data and tools, as well as training on technical methods for conducting research using HCUP datasets.

  • The all-new Calculating Standard Error tutorial is designed to help users determine the precision of the estimates they produce from the HCUP nationwide databases.  Users will learn two methods for calculating standard errors for estimates produced from the HCUP nationwide databases.
  • The newly revised HCUP Overview Course is a helpful introduction to HCUP for new users.  The original course has been updated to include the latest additions to the HCUP family of databases and tools, including the Nationwide emergency Department Sample.

 The HCUP Online Tutorial Series is available on the HCUP-US Web site.  For more information, contact HCUP User Support at hcup@ahrq.gov.

April 22, 2011 Posted by | Librarian Resources, Public Health, Tutorials/Finding aids | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

HCUP Facts and Figures: Statistics on Hospital-based Care in the United States

Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project logo
HCUP Facts and Figures 2008
Statistics on Hospital-Based Care in the United States, 2008
The number of patients who needed home health care after being discharged from hospitals surged by about 70 percent (2.3 million to 4 million) from 1997 to 2008.  [Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HCUP, HCUP Facts and Figures, Statistics on Hospital-Based Care in the United States, 2008.]

Some highlights from HCUP Facts and Figures: Statistics on Hospital-based Care in the United States, 2008 

OVERVIEW STATISTICS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAYS
EXHIBIT
The number of hospital discharges increased from 34.7 million in 1997 to 39.9 million in 2008, a 15-percent increase overall, or an average annual increase of 1.3 percent. 1.1
Between 1997 and 2008, the aggregate inflation-adjusted costs for hospitalizations—the actual costs of producing hospital services—increased 61 percent. Costs rose from $227.2 billion to $364.7 billion—an average annual increase of 4.4 percent. 1.1
The average length of stay (ALOS) in 2008 (4.6 days) was almost 20 percent shorter than in 1993 (5.7 days). The ALOS declined throughout most of the 1990s and has remained unchanged since 2000. 1.2
Circulatory conditions were the most frequent major cause of hospital stays in 2008, accounting for 5.9 million stays or 15 percent of all discharges. 1.3
Even when pregnancy and childbirth stays are excluded, females accounted for more stays than males—18.6 million stays for females compared to 16.5 million stays for males. 1.3
Pregnancy and childbirth was the reason for 1 out of every 5 female hospitalizations (4.7 million stays). 1.3
Medicare and Medicaid were the expected primary payers for more than half (55 percent) of all inpatient hospital discharges. 1.4
Between 1997 and 2008, Medicaid discharges (up 30 percent) grew at double the rate of all discharges, followed closely by uninsured discharges (up 27 percent). 1.4
The number of discharges billed to Medicare grew by 18 percent. 1.4
Growth in the number of discharges billed to private insurance remained relatively stable (5 percent). 1.4
The number of discharges to home health care grew by 69 percent (1.6 million discharges) between 1997 and 2008. 1.5
Uninsured and Medicaid stays accounted for nearly half (48 percent) of all stays discharged against medical advice, but only about one-quarter (23 percent) of all stays in 2008. 1.5
Persons residing in the poorest communities had a 21-percent higher rate of hospitalization in 2008 (148 discharges per 1,000 population) than those residing in all other communities (122 discharges per 1,000 population). 1.6

April 18, 2011 Posted by | Health Statistics, Public Health | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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