Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[News article] Exercise as Potent Medicine

Believe there is some truth to this. Once I started exercising regularly (at least 30 minutes four times a week), my LDL was raised considerably.  My doctor was a bit taken aback.

 

“…drugs and exercise produced almost exactly the same [risk of dying] results”

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From the 11 December 2013 New York Times article

Exercise can be as effective as many frequently prescribed drugs in treating some of the leading causes of death, according to a new report. The study raises important questions about whether our health care system focuses too much on medications and too little on activity to combat physical ailments.

For the study, which was published in October in BMJ, researchers compared how well various drugs and exercise succeed in reducing deaths among people who have been diagnosed with several common and serious conditions, including heart disease and diabetes.

The results consistently showed that drugs and exercise produced almost exactly the same results. People with heart disease, for instance, who exercised but did not use commonly prescribed medications, including statins, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or antiplatelet drugs, had the same risk of dying from — or surviving — heart disease as patients taking those drugs. Similarly, people with diabetes who exercised had the same relative risk of dying from the condition as those taking the most commonly prescribed drugs. Or as the researchers wrote in statistics-speak, “When compared head to head in network meta-analyses, all interventions were not different beyond chance.”

On the other hand, people who once had suffered a stroke had significantly less risk of dying from that condition if they exercised than if they used medications — although the study authors note that stroke patients who can exercise may have been unusually healthy to start with.

Only in chronic heart failure were drugs noticeably more effective than exercise. Diuretics staved off mortality better than did exercise.

“We are not suggesting that anyone stop taking their medications,” he said. “But maybe people could think long and hard about their lifestyles and talk to their doctors” about whether exercise could and should be incorporated into their care.

December 14, 2013 Posted by | Consumer Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cocoa may enhance skeletal muscle function

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March 5, 2012 Posted by | Nutrition | , | Leave a comment

Study Reveals Health-Literate Patients Not Always Adept At Managing Heart Failure Care

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A patient’s education level is not a fail-safe predictor of how well they will manage symptoms related to complicated chronic diseases, such as heart failure, according to a Purdue University study.

“Our research indicates that some of the better-educated heart failure patients in our sample did not manage their symptoms as well as those who were less educated,” said Karen S. Yehle, an assistant professor of nursing who specializes in cardiovascular conditions. “We’re not sure why this is. It could be that heart failure patients with lower health literacy experience symptoms more often and, therefore, know how to manage them better. No matter the reason, it’s a reminder to doctors, nurses and pharmacists to communicate clearly and thoroughly to all patients, regardless of how much information or guidance they might believe a particular patient needs.” …

Overall, we found that health literacy – a patient’s ability to read and understand health information – was associated with proper daily care and management for heart failure patients,” Chen said. “But there was a statistically significant negative relationship with self-care management, or when patients respond to heart failure symptoms. When patients with higher health literacy did not have symptoms, they were better at adhering to the day-to-day care of the condition in comparison to those with lower health literacy. However, when symptomatic, they appeared to have more difficulty in addressing the condition-related problems.” ..

“It’s critical that providers have better insight into how to communicate with their patients or follow up with them about their self-care,” Plake said. “From a practitioner viewpoint, you can’t assume that the information delivered to a patient is interpreted the way you want it to be. We can’t make the assumption that if someone is highly educated they are more likely to take better care of themselves.”

December 19, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

   

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