Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblog] Infographic: Top Trends in Telemedicine (at mHealthWatch)

Infographic: Top Trends in Telemedicine | mHealthWatch.

October 03, 2013 — By 

Infographic: Top Trends in Telemedicine   telemedicine mHealth infographics CDW According to recently compiled data fromCDW, telemedicine continues to advance at an impressive pace.

From monitoring chronic health conditions to providing teleconsultations to patients, the opportunities are vast when it comes to positive telemedicine applications.

So what are the top trends in telemedicine today? Check out this informative visual snapshot of this remarkably healthy young industry and its impressive growth.

 

Infographic: Top Trends in Telemedicine   telemedicine mHealth infographics CDW

This post was written by:

 – who has written 448 posts on mHealthWatch.

 

October 26, 2013 Posted by | health care | , , , | Leave a comment

JAMIA reports on people, their information needs and social networks

From the 6 May 2011 Eureka news alert

The May issue of JAMIA, the top-ranked journal reporting on informatics in biomedical and health informatics, features new scientific research—in print and online—on healthcare’s hottest HIT-related topics, written by prominent experts working in health and biomedicine.

[The online May issue may be found here. Most articles are by paid subscription/fee only.
For suggestions on how to get articles for free, click here.]

Editor-in chief Lucila Ocho-Machado bullets some of the rich content in the newly released, current issue:

  • “A secure protocol for protecting the identity of providers when disclosing data for disease surveillance” (Editor’s Choice, available free online) — Lead author Khaled El Emam of Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, proposes a protocol to protect the privacy of providers who disclose data for public health purposes. A related online appendix describes the technical details.
  • “Rank-based spatial clustering: an algorithm for rapid outbreak detection” — Lead author Jialan Que of the RODS Laboratory at the Department of Biomedical Informatics at University of Pittsburgh describes a new algorithm for rapid outbreak detection that ranks regions according to risk, then uses these rankings to define clusters, in contrast with other techniques that search for predetermined cluster shapes around a high-risk area.
  • “Social disparities in internet patient portal use in diabetes: evidence that the digital divide extends beyond access” (Editor’s Choice, available free online) —Lead author Urmimala Sarkar of University of California’s Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, describes disparities in patient usage of a diabetes online resource, and indicates that the gap cannot be solely justified on the basis of differences in access to technology.
  • “Can poison control data be used for pharmaceutical poisoning surveillance?” — Lead author Christopher A. Naun of Intermountain Injury Control Research Center in Salt Lake City, reports on the pros and cons of using poison control data for decision support related to pharmaceutical surveillance.

Other JAMIA content includes examination of:

  • electronic health records in small physician practices
  • the quality and safety of diabetes-related online social networks
  • information needs of case managers caring for people living with HIV
  • the accuracy of a computerized clinical-decision support system for asthma assessment and management

“This issue provides a sample of the diversity of approaches and disciplines that make our field so fascinating,” says Dr. Ohno-Machado, introducing the current issue. She reminds readers that “informatics is as much concerned about people, their information needs, and their social networks, as it is about algorithms and systems.”

###

JAMIA is jointly published by AMIA and the BMJ Group. Its content appears online at www.jamia.org

AMIA, as the voice of the biomedical and health informatics community, plays an important role in medicine, health care, and science, encouraging the use of data, information and knowledge to improve both human health and delivery of healthcare services. AMIA is an unbiased, authoritative source of information within the professional informatics community and the health care industry, committed to driving health improvements and improving healthcare delivery.

May 7, 2011 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News, Public Health | , | 1 Comment

IU Personalized Medicine Institute to develop targeted and individualized treatments

IU Personalized Medicine Institute to develop targeted and individualized treatments

David Flockhart, M.D., Ph.D. Director, Indiana Institute for Personalized Medicine

 

 

From the February 9 2011 Eureka news alert

Indiana University has announced a major commitment to research in one of health care’s most promising fields with the creation of the Indiana Institute for Personalized Medicine.

The institute’s members will be drawn from the IU schools of medicine, informatics and nursing, with $11.25 million in funding provided by the School of Medicine, the school’s Department of Medicine, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the Indiana Physician Scientist Initiative and the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer. The Indiana Physician Scientist Initiative is funded by a $60 million grant from the Lilly Endowment.

Building on modern research techniques that have made it possible to decipher the genetic code, detect slight genetic differences between patients and determine how those affect the way the body metabolizes drugs, physicians are beginning to be able to select more appropriate treatments for individual patients. Research to make such tools broadly available remains in the early but promising stages, institute leaders said.

“Much of the future of health care is in personalized medicine, meaning more precise targeting of the right medication to the right patient at the right time,” said David Flockhart, M.D., Ph.D., who has been named director of the institute.

“We believe it should lead to cost benefits – it clearly will be better for patients,” said Dr. Flockhart, Harry and Edith Gladstein Professor of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology.

“The Indiana Institute for Personalized Medicine is a not only a logical extension of our academic mission but is also part of our strategic plan to be a global leader in translational medicine,” said David S. Wilkes, M.D., executive associate dean for research affairs at the IU School of Medicine.

Some of the earliest examples of personalized medicine have come in the field of cancer treatment. Oncologists now can test a breast cancer patient’s tumor to determine not only whether it is the type that is stimulated to grow by the hormone estrogen, but whether it is a subtype that can be treated with hormone therapy or another type that requires chemotherapy. Cardiology, pediatrics and obstetrics also will be important areas of focus for the institute, said Dr. Flockhart.

“To identify more precisely which drugs are likely to be more effective — or less effective and more toxic — will have a substantial impact on optimizing health care delivery and rationally curbing costs. In no discipline is this more keenly needed than in cancer care where drugs can be extremely costly and toxic,” said Patrick J. Loehrer Sr., M.D., director of the IU Simon Cancer Center.

IU scientists have been working on related research for at least a decade, but creating an institute “allows you to really jump start research and raise the level participation of an institution in both the laboratory and in the clinic, in a broad range of research interests,” Dr. Flockhart said.

For example, Janet Carpenter, Ph.D., R.N., professor in the School of Nursing and a member of the institute, sees personalized medicine playing a key role in improving the treatment of menopause.

“About 6,000 American women enter menopause every day yet personalized medicine has not been well-integrated into their health care,” she said. “The institute will play a very important role in ensuring that women receive the most appropriate and effective menopausal symptom management therapies.”

Mathew Palakal, Ph.D., associate dean for graduate studies and research at the School of Informatics noted that “research in personalized medicine spans a broad spectrum from systems biology to nanomedicine to gene therapy. Our research in such areas as systems biology, biological network analysis and proteomics, along with our graduate programs in health informatics and bioinformatics, will enable informatics and the School of Informatics to play a significant role in the success of the institute.”

“This science will enable physicians to prescribe the right medicines at the right dosages and intervals to maximize efficacy and prevent unwanted toxicity. It should be a very exciting next 10 years of research,” said D. Wade Clapp, M.D., chairman of the Department of Pediatrics…..

 

 

February 13, 2011 Posted by | Health News Items | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: