Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Online Health Care Data Sources | Brookings Institution

Online Health Care Data Sources | Brookings Institution.

 

From the Web site

This is a preliminary scan of publicly available online health care datasets, transparency websites and tools, gathered from expert recommendations and intensive review. Though this list is not exhaustive, we have attempted to include the most relevant sources for the purposes of this study. Each health data source is assigned an icon representing (1) who the source is useful to i.e. consumers or researchers; (2) what information the source includes i.e. data pertaining to quality of care or cost of care; and (3) who the source provides information on i.e. providers or payers.

December 2, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , , , | Leave a comment

North Carolina Just Made It A Lot Easier To Figure Out If Your Hospital Is Ripping You Off

From the 23 August 2013 Think Progress article

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory (R) has signed abill that will require the state’s hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers to publicly disclose how much they charge — and how much insurers pay them — for 140 common medical procedures. The information will be posted to the Tar Heel State’s Department of Health and Human Services website and provide consumers a way of knowing which hospitals are giving them the most bang for their buck.

….

The federal government took a small step towards addressing this lack of transparency by releasing charge records for the most common inpatient procedures at more than 3,300 hospitals across 306 locales in May. The numbers confirmed health care experts’ suspicions: the cost of U.S. medical care is essentially arbitrary, with even hospitals in the same county charging anywhere from $7,000 to $99,700 for the same procedure. And the hospitals charging the most money don’t even offer much better services. Reform advocates say these staggering fluctuations are a direct result of price opacity.

But North Carolina’s law actually goes further than the federal government did by giving consumers even more relevant information. The top-line charge data released by the government isn’t actually what insurers and patients pay hospitals. The actual payments are negotiated between the hospitals, insurers, and uninsured Americans. To address that, the North Carolina will require hospitals to disclose the actual prices paid by Medicare, Medicaid, and Americans without any health coverage for the procedures in question, as well as the average and range of prices paid by the top five insurers in the state.

Read the entire article here

 

August 25, 2013 Posted by | health care | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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