Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Anxiety increases the risk of gastrointestinal infection and long-term complications | EurekAlert! Science News

Anxiety increases the risk of gastrointestinal infection and long-term complications | EurekAlert! Science News.

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From the 2 July 2015 news release

A team comprised of scientists at VIB, KU Leuven and UZ Leuven has made significant progress in uncovering the connection between psychological factors and the immune system. Their findings are based on an investigation of a massive drinking water contamination incident in Belgium in 2010, and are now published in the leading international medical journal Gut.

In December 2010, the Belgian communities of Schelle and Hemiksem in the province of Antwerp faced an outbreak of gastroenteritis, with more than 18,000 people exposed to contaminated drinking water. During the outbreak, VIB and KU Leuven set up a scientific task force to study the incident’s long-term effects, led by Guy Boeckxstaens (UZ Leuven / KU Leuven) and Adrian Liston (VIB / KU Leuven).

Seizing an unexpected opportunity

Adrian Liston (VIB/KU Leuven): “The water contamination in Schelle and Hemiksem was an ‘accidental experiment’ on a scale rarely possible in medical research. By following the patients from the initial contamination to a year after the outbreak we were able to find out what factors altered the risk of long-term complications.”

Anxiety and depression affect immune system

The scientists found that individual with higher levels of anxiety or depression prior to the water contamination developed gastrointestinal infections of increased severity. The same individuals also had an increased risk of developing the long-term complication of irritable bowel syndrome, with intermittent abdominal cramps, diarrhea or constipation a year after the initial contamination.

Guy Boeckxstaens (UZ Leuven / KU Leuven): “Irritable Bowel Syndrome is a condition of chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel movements. This is a common condition with large socio-economic costs, yet there is so much that still remains to be discovered about the causes. Our investigation found that that anxiety or depression alters the immune response towards a gastrointestinal infection, which can result in more severe symptoms and the development of chronic irritable bowel syndrome.”

Psychological factors key in preventing long-term complications

The study’s results provide valuable new insight into the cause of irritable bowel syndrome, and underscoring the connection between psychological factors and the immune system.

Adrian Liston (VIB/KU Leuven): “These results once again emphasize the importance of mental health care and social support services. We need to understand that health, society and economics are not independent, and ignoring depression and anxiety results in higher long-term medical costs.”

July 17, 2015 Posted by | Consumer Safety, Medical and Health Research News, Psychology | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Marijuana use associated with cyclic vomiting syndrome in young males

Marijuana use associated with cyclic vomiting syndrome in young males

From the 9th January 2011 Eureka news alert

Researchers have found clear associations between marijuana use in young males and cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), where patients experience episodes of vomiting separated by symptom free intervals.

The study, published in the January issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, looked at 226 patients seen at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, New York, USA, over a 13-year period.

These were broken into three groups. Eighty-two patients with CVS were randomly matched with 82 patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) based on age, gender and geographic referral region. Researchers also examined the records of 62 patients with functional vomiting (FV), recurrent vomiting that cannot be attributed to a specific physical or psychiatric cause.

“Our study showed that CVS and FV had very similar clinical features, apart from marijuana use” says Dr G Richard Locke III from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Clinic.

Key findings of the study included:

  • Members of the CVS group were younger than members of the FV group (30 versus 36 years) and more likely to be male (53% versus 46%).
  • No statistically significant association was detected between membership of the CVS and FV groups and marital status, education level, body mass index, employment status, alcohol use or smoking history.
  • 37% of the CVS group had used marijuana (81% male), together with 13% of the FV group (equally split between male and female) and 11% of the IBS group (73% male).

Click here to read the rest of the article

January 25, 2012 Posted by | Consumer Health | , , , | Leave a comment

As probiotics use grows for gut health, VSL#3 has designations for specific GI issues

 

diagram of a human digestive system

Image via Wikipedia

From the 17 November 2011 Eureka News Alert

VSL#3, classified as medical food, is designated for the dietary management of UC, ileal pouch and IBS

GAITHERSBERG, MD, Nov. 18 – As clinical studies continue to validate the use of probiotics to help promote general gastrointestinal health, a growing U.S. market1 for probiotics indicates that the U.S. healthcare community and consumers alike are recognizing the value of these beneficial microorganisms. However, because most probiotics are classified as dietary supplements, directing patients to the best probiotic for their individual needs can be challenging. And, as the category matures, one probiotic preparation — VSL#3 — stands apart and ahead because it is not a supplement; it has been classified as a refrigerated medical food designated for the dietary management of three major gastrointestinal conditions: Ulcerative Colitis, Ileal Pouch and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host.” But research also shows that probiotics are not “one size fits all.”

“As the amount of research in the field of probiotics increases, clinical evidence continues to indicate that not all probiotics are the same; probiotic activity is strain-specific and unique, and some strains can have antagonistic or synergistic activities when mixed together,” said Marc Tewey, vice president, commercial operations, at Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., manufacturer of VSL#3. “VSL#3 is formulated with a precise mix of eight proprietary strains of live bacteria, and the result is a probiotic medical food so potent, it must be used under medical supervision and must be shipped and sold as a refrigerated product.”

What are medical foods?

According to the FDA, medical foods are:

  • Specially formulated and processed products for the partial or exclusive feeding of a patient by means of oral intake or parenteral tube feeding
  • For dietary management of patients with special medically determined nutrient requirements that cannot be achieved by diet alone
  • Designed to provide nutritional support specifically modified for the management of the unique nutrient needs
  • Only for use under medical supervision
  • Only for a patient receiving active medical care on a recurring basis for the use of the medical food

The VSL#3 line of products contain between 112.5 billion and 900 billion live, colony-forming units (CFU), the large numbers of which make them the most potent brand of probiotics available and require the product to be refrigerated. VSL#3 utilizes a synergistic combination of diverse strains of bacteria including: Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacteria longum, Bifidobacteria infantis, Bifidobacteria breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus. Clinical studies using VSL#3 and published in notable journals, such as Gut, Gastroenterology and the American Journal of Gastroenterology have indicated that it colonizes the GI tract with beneficial bacteria, and in doing so, forms an intestinal barrier, which may help protect the GI tract and promote the absorption of nutrients.

“One of the main goals of physicians whose patients are living with these chronic diseases is to lengthen the periods between symptom ‘flares’ as much as possible,” said Tewey. “Studies show that incorporating the use of this type of dietary therapy alongside traditional drug therapies can be an effective step in achieving that goal for many who suffer from these debilitating conditions.”

VSL#3 is one of the few probiotic preparations supported by Level 1 (double-blind, placebo-controlled) scientific data, and has been the subject of a collection of more than 80 studies that have demonstrated its efficacy, specifically in the dietary management of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis and Ileal Pouch. It is the only probiotic recognized as an effective tool in the dietary management of pouchitis by the American College of Gastroenterology2 and by the Cochrane Review3 for the treatment and prevention of pouchtis after ileal pouch-anal anastamosis for chronic ulcerative colitis.

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VSL#3 products are available online at www.vsl3.com, as well as behind the pharmacy counter at pharmacies nationwide. They come in three formulations: VSL#3 DS prescription-only packets, VSL#3 OTC packets and VSL#3 OTC capsules. Physicians and pharmacists interested in additional information about the product can call 1-866-634-2765 and consumers may call 1-866-GET-VSL3 or visit www.vsl3.com for more information.

1 Source: “U.S. Digestive Health Enzymes, Prebiotics & Probiotics Market (2010 – 2015)” Markets and Markets, July 4, 2011

2Kornbluth, A, Sachar DB. Ulcerative colitis practice guidelines in adults: American College of Gastroenterology, Practice Parameters Committee.; Practice Parameters Committee of the American College of Gastroenterology. AM J. Gastroenterol. 2010 Mar; 105(3):501-23

3Holubar SD et al., (Review) The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 6.

 

Educational Resources

 

 

 

November 18, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health, Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Medical and Health Research News | , , | Leave a comment

   

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