Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Press release] Elsevier Announces the Launch of Atlas: Research for a Better World | Elsevier

Elsevier Announces the Launch of Atlas: Research for a Better World | Elsevier.

Only three articles so far, may be worth returning to in the future. Bonus – all scientific articles referred to will be available for free.

Excerpt from the press release

ublishing about the science behind global issues that affect us all in a format that can be read by all

Oxford, January 5, 2015Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the launch of a new virtual journal: Atlas. Published as a virtual journal, Atlas selects already published research on topics that hold high societal relevance or address global issues, and summarizes and presents the science in a lay-friendly, story format to reach an as wide as possible global audience.

Atlas showcases research that can (or already has) significantly impact(ed) people’s lives around the world. Articles published are selected by an external advisory board made up of representatives of some of the world’s most renowned Non-Government Organisations (NGOs), including the United Nations University and Oxfam.  Every month the Board selects a paper from a shortlist of suggested articles published in any of Elsevier’s 1800+ journals. Once selected, the author(s) of the paper are awarded “The Atlas” and work with a team of dedicated Atlas science journalists to summarize the research into an easy-to-digest, lay-friendly story format which will be published online. Additionally, all articles featured on Atlas will include a direct link to the full research paper on ScienceDirect which will be made freely available for all.

– See more at: http://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/research-and-journals/elsevier-announces-the-launch-of-atlas-research-for-a-better-world#sthash.fGan6rY2.dpuf

January 20, 2015 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Health Education (General Public) | , , , , | Leave a comment

How to obtain free and low cost articles from biomedical journals

Heard about a new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and want to read about the original research? Need to go to the source about a new surgical procedure? Medical articles, written by physicians and scientists just might be the answer.**

Most  medical articles are quite technically written and are published in journals which require paid subscriptions (even tho’ they are online!). Examples of medical journals include the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Lancet.

Medical journals (a type of scholarly journals) differ from popular magazines (as Psychology Today) in appearance, audience, and purpose. Duke University has a great comparison chart on the differences between scholarly journals and popular magazines.

A few great places to get free and low cost medical articles

  • Libraries Many public libraries have at least some medical journals. Most college, university, and medical school libraries (and all receiving some state funding) are open to the public and provide some reference services to the general public. These academic libraries vary in the number of subscribed medical journals.
    Some hospital libraries are also open to the public.It is best to call ahead and ask a reference librarian to see if the library is open to the public, if they have the article you need, and if you can use their computers and printers. Ask about interlibrary loan from any library where you have borrowing privileges. Your library will try to get any article they do not have from another library (there usually is a charge, upwards of $11.00 or more  an article).
  • PubMed Centra****l provides access to free articles submitted by authors and publishers. Some articles are free immediately when they are published, others are free on a delayed basis (ranging from a few months to a year). Check the PubMed Central home page for additional information. PubMed Central is a service of the US National Institutes of Health.
  • Free Full PDFOver 80 million free scientific publications
    Life sciences | Health sciences | Physics sciences and Engineering | Social sciences and Humanities
  • Docline is the National Library of Medicine’s automated interlibrary loan (ILL) request routing and referral system. The purpose of the system is to provide efficient document delivery service among libraries in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM).

Individual users of NLM’s PubMed and the NLM Gateway do not have access to DOCLINE, but they can make use of its services by ordering documents through Loansome Doc, a document ordering service. All PubMed or NLM Gateway users ordering documents must identify a DOCLINE library or libraries that are willing to serve them (Ordering Library). The health professional performs a PubMed or NLM Gateway search, reviews the citations retrieved, and identifies specific documents to be ordered. Orders are sent to DOCLINE from either PubMed or the NLM Gateway. The NLM PubMed server manages all document-ordering activities.

LoansomeDoc is for people who are not affiliated with a health or medical institution that has a library. (If your institution has a library, just ask a librarian about ordering articles through interlibrary loan). To register for LoansomeDoc, contact the closest medical library.
They can help you set up an account, including payments for articles. You should be able
receive most, if not all, ordered articles via email.

  • How to Access Journal Articles provides links to information resources and services.Includes links to free articles, strategies for obtaining articles, and paying for full text articles. By Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce.

  • Contact the Author Email, fax, or write the author. Most authors are happy to provide a free copy of their articles if asked. Cannot locate an address or fax number? Ask a reference librarian!
  • Contact the Publisher An increasing number of publishers are providing free copies of articles to patients, caregivers, and others who do not subscribe to their journals but only need a specific article for personal use.
    If the publisher does not advertise this free service, consider contacting them and requesting a specific article.  Need help contacting a publisher? Again, ask a reference librarian!

Some publishers which provide free or low cost articles (via PatientInform)

Elsevier Patient Research provides single copies of articles for $4.95. Elsevier publishes over 2,000 journals.

AACR’s (American Association for Cancer Research) policy for free patient access to medical articles—“If You Need It, You Can Read It”—can be found under Information for Readers/Subscribers.

The Endocrine Society For Patients page provides information on how to obtain free articles from its six endocrine research journals.

****Also, note that “The NIH Public Access Policy ensures that the public has access to the published results of NIH funded research. It requires scientists to submit final peer-reviewed journal manuscripts that arise from NIH funds to the digital archive PubMed Central upon acceptance for publication. To help advance science and improve human health, the Policy requires that these papers are accessible to the public on PubMed Central no later than 12 months after publication.”
I hear health sciences librarians are keeping busy advising researchers on how to comply with this.
http://publicaccess.nih.gov

**When a good summary of an article will do, check out the resources at Summaries for Patients” help patients and others understand medical studies and guidelines


November 7, 2010 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Free Medically Related Journals

Most medically related journals (as the New England Journal of Medicine [NEJM]) require subscriptions.
However, a number of these journals do have portions of each issue available for free online. Also, an increasing number of journals provide issues for free after time periods ranging from a few months to a year.

For example,  the  Sept 16 2010 NEJM issue has four (4) free articles, including The Safety of  (the drug) Tiotropium .
The Annals of Internal Medicine provides its articles for free after 6 months.

Several places to find free medically related journals

Highwire Free Online Full-text articles (Stanford)  Currently provides access to about 1,400 journals : 46 completely free journals, 282 with free back issues. Search and browse options. One can browse by publisher, topic, and journal title.

Free Medical Journals (Amedeo) Currently provides access to about 1,70o journals. Most have restrictions on which content is free (by section and/or date).  Search and browse options. One can browse by topic (as infectious diseases), free access dates (as immediately, after 1-6 months), and journal title.

PubMed Central (US National Institute of Health [NIH]). Free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature. Publishers volunteer to participate at PubMed Central. Currently provides access to over 1,000 journals. Each journal entry includes date ranges and  indication of what content is free. Search option has many features. For example, the Limits tab allows one to limit by type of article (research/review) , tag term (author, word in abstract, etc), and date.

Ask a librarian in higher education!

Many academic and university institutions (including all receiving state funding) allow the public to do research at their libraries. Check with their reference librarians to see if they have the journal you are looking for as well as any limitations on using their computers. Most librarians at these institutions can give you limited assistance in searching for medically related information. Again, call ahead for what to expect.

Don’t forget your public library!

Librarians there may get you started on finding journal articles. They may also be able to help you with the most comprehensive place to search for medically related journal articles, PubMed.  Also, most public libraries have interlibrary loan, where you can request an article from another library. However, there will probably be a charge for the article.

Questions about this post?

Please email me, Janice Flahiff, at jmflahiff@yahoo.com. I will do my best to reply within 24 hours (48 on the weekend).

October 2, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | 3 Comments

Surgeons fail to disclose big payments to journals

From a Reuters Health Information news item

Nearly half of surgeons who earned more than $1 million from companies that make orthopedic devices did not disclose it when they published medical journal articles, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

“The findings raise troubling questions about undisclosed payments or royalties and other fees from medical device companies that could lead to biased scientific conclusions,” said David Rothman of the Institute on Medicine as a Profession, a think tank based at Columbia University in New York.

Members of Congress including Senator Charles Grassley, an Iowa Republican, have been pushing to limit the influence drugmakers have over the practice of medicine in the United States after investigations revealed that Harvard University psychiatrist Dr. Joseph Biederman and others failed to fully disclose payments from drug companies.

Rothman’s team used a public database to check the accuracy of surgeons’ financial disclosure statements.

They focused on five companies: Biomet; DePuy Orthopedics, a unit of Johnson & Johnson; Smith & Nephew; Stryker and Zimmer.

These companies made a total of 1,654 payments that amounted to $248 million in 2007 for consulting, honoraria or other payments for services, the team reported.

September 15, 2010 Posted by | Health News Items | , , | Leave a comment

   

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