Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Patients Tell How Magnetic Therapy Lifted Their Depression

TMS

TMS (Photo credit: jeanbaptisteparis)

 

From the 15 October 2012 article at Science Daily

 

Three patients who have suffered periodic major depression throughout their adult lives told an audience attending a Loyola Grand Rounds presentation how their lives have been transformed by a new magnetic therapy.

The treatment, called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), sends short pulses of magnetic fields to the brain.

“I feel better now than I have in a very long time,” said patient Jannel Jump. “I’m living a life now, rather than hiding from it.”

Another patient said TMS brought him out of a depression so severe he couldn’t get out of bed.

And a third patient said TMS “has helped me to have a glass-is-half-full outlook. I’m in a much better spot today.”

The Food and Drug Administration approved TMS in 2009 for patients who have major depression and have tried and failed at least one antidepressant. The FDA has approved one TMS system, NeuroStar®, made by Neuronetics, said Dr. Murali Rao, MD, DFAPA, FAPM, Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine….

 

 

October 16, 2012 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Practices

 

 

From the July 2012 issue of NCCAM Clinical Digest   (US National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine)

 

Millions of Americans suffer from pain that is chronic, severe, and not easily managed. Pain from arthritis, back problems, other musculoskeletal conditions, and headache costs U.S. businesses more than $61 billion a year in lost worker productivity.

Pain is the most common health problem for which adults use complementary health practices. Many people with conditions causing chronic pain turn to these practices to supplement other conventional medical treatment, or when their pain is resistant or in an effort to advert side effects of medications. Despite the widespread use of complementary health practices for chronic pain, scientific evidence on efficacy and mechanisms—whether the therapies help the conditions for which they are used and, if so, how—is, for the most part, limited. However, the evidence base is growing, especially for several complementary health practices most commonly used by people to lessen pain.

This issue highlights the research status for several therapies used for common kinds of pain, includingarthritisfibromyalgiaheadachelow-back pain, and neck pain.

 

Information for Your Patients

 

 

 

 

August 6, 2012 Posted by | Consumer Health, Health Education (General Public) | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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