Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[News item] Fortified foods make up for some missing nutrients: study (but unprocessed is still best)

From the 6 February 2014 Reuter article

 

(Reuters Health) – Fortification of foods with additional nutrients does have an impact on kids’ intake of vitamins and minerals, but many children and teens are still not getting adequate nutrition, according to a new U.S. study.

Based on a large national dietary survey, the researchers found that without fortification, the diets of a large number of children and teens would be nutritionally inadequate. With fortification the picture is better, but not perfect.

(Reuters Health) – Fortification of foods with additional nutrients does have an impact on kids’ intake of vitamins and minerals, but many children and teens are still not getting adequate nutrition, according to a new U.S. study.

Based on a large national dietary survey, the researchers found that without fortification, the diets of a large number of children and teens would be nutritionally inadequate. With fortification the picture is better, but not perfect.

Katz said the paper demonstrates that in a culture that eats very poorly, we need fortification to have adequate nutrient intake.

“But what this paper does not address at all is: what would happen if we actually ate well,” he added.

Katz said it’s a mistake to think that preventing nutrient deficiencies with fortified “junk” foods is in any way the same as eating truly good foods.

“Eating a variety of wholesome foods would provide those same nutrients, along with many others, and without the sugar, salt, refined starch, unhealthy oils, excess calories and so on,” Katz said.

SOURCE: bit.ly/1iq2L5M Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Online January 27, 2014.

Tasty Food Abundance in Healthy Europe

Tasty Food Abundance in Healthy Europe (Photo credit: epSos.de) http://www.flickr.com/photos/36495803@N05/8077920518

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the entire article here

 

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

February 8, 2014 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , | Leave a comment

Keep fruit and vegetables in daylight to boost nutrients

Sounds like a lot of work, but an interesting article.
Also wondering, as one of the commentators, if by the time we get the food home, will these cycles matter?

Natural Products News and Updates

Current Biology published a study regarding the best way to store fruits and vegetables to obtain the most benefit. The study found fruits and vegetables follow a 24-hour plant clock. Food crops can alter the internal chemical level throughout the day in order to ward off pests. Storing fruits and vegetables under the light-dark cycles helps them to preserve more nutrients. Glucosinates, a chemical with anti-cancer property is produced by cabbage in the day; refrigerated cabbage on the opposite produced less glucosinates. Further tests revealed many other crops (e.g., lettuce, spinach, courgettes, sweet potatoes, carrots and blueberries) also follow the same light-dark cycle. Please share your thoughts on the result of this study. How do you typically store your fruits or vegetables?

For the full article, click here.

View original post

July 14, 2013 Posted by | Nutrition | , , | Leave a comment

Better Nutrition Provided By ‘Microgreens’ Compared To Their Mature Counterparts

 

Abstract Image

[From the abstract]

From the 31 August 2012 article at Medical News Today

The first scientific analysis of nutrient levels in edible microgreens has found that many of those trendy seedlings of green vegetables and herbs have more vitaminsand healthful nutrients than their fully grown counterparts. A report on the research appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry…

..

They found that microgreens generally have higher concentrations of healthful vitamins and carotenoids than their mature counterparts. But they also found wide variations in nutrient levels among the plants tested in the study. Red cabbage microgreens, for instance, had the highest concentration of vitamin C, for instance, while green daikon radish microgreens had the most vitamin E. Concentrations of vitamins and carotenoids in popcorn shoots and golden pea tendrils were low compared to other microgreens, but were still as high as some common mature vegetables.

One other notable finding: Exposing microgreens to light tended to change the nutritional content, which is an ongoing research effort led by Dr. Lester and Dr. Wang, and results will be published soo

 

September 4, 2012 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: