Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[News article] Amount, types of fat we eat affect health, risk of disease with an AND Opinion Piece

Screen Shot 2014-01-22 at 6.10.29 AM

Amount, types of fat we eat affect health, risk of disease.

Screen Shot 2014-01-22 at 5.40.26 AMHealthy adults should consume between 20 percent and 35 percent of their calories from dietary fat, increase their consumption of omega-3 fatty acids, and limit their intake of saturated and trans fats, according to an updated position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics**.

Read the entire article here

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**An aside about corporate sponsorship at the academy. The Current corporate sponsors include companies which make “junk” food in addition to healthier products.
A recent non mainstream article questions how the academy can not be influenced  by these corporations, including their advice to the public.
The academy does publish Guidelines for Corporate Relations Sponsors  which include

  • Fit with Academy strategic goals
  • Scientific accuracy
  • Conformance with Academy positions, policies and philosophies
  • Academy editorial control of all content in materials bearing the Academy name
  • Clear separation of Academy messages and content from brand information or promotion
  • No endorsement of any particular brand or company product
  • The inclusion of relevant facts and important information where their omission would present an unbalanced view of a controversial issue in which the sponsor has a stake
  • Full funding by the sponsor of all direct and indirect costs associated with the project

Ultimately, it is up to the individual to accept or not accept findings with the academy.
I’ve gathered some great online sites on how to evaluate health information. 

Have to say that I have found some of the information at the academy very useful.
For example, their peer reviewed Consumer and Lifestyle App Reviews in the areas of weight management, diabetes, and gluten free products. But even with the apps, it is good to check on who created them and is sponsoring them.

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January 22, 2014 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tough and Tasty: Recasting a Resilient Weed as a Wild Edible

Purslane.Photo

From http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Purslane.html

I don’t know of any resource which analyzes every single weed out there for nutrients, calories, etc.
However it seems weeds could be a good addition to one’s diet.
And a great addition to the urban garden.

From the 30 July 2013 article at Quest- Exploring the Science of Sustainability

If a farmer told you not to pull a weed, would you be worried about him? Maybe you’d insist he get out of the heat and drink some water, or take a vacation.

Believe it or not, that farmer may have good reason to protect his weeds.

In the middle of July 2012, the costliest drought in recorded history had Nebraska in its grip. Not a sprinkle of rain had fallen on Ross Brockley’s farm since June 4, and wouldn’t again until July 31. His half-dozen acres of vegetable gardens were green thanks only to constant watering by hand and diligent weeding performed by Brockley, his wife, Barb, and me, his lone farmhand.

Here in the southeast corner of the state, residents had spent their summer watching scorched soil crack and fields of crops turn brown. On this particular day I noticed a very healthy plant in an empty garden bed. It didn’t resemble anything I recognized as food so I pulled it up.

Even amid the dead stalks of drought-stricken corn, purslane was defiantly rearing its little red branches.

“Don’t do that!” Brockley yelped from across the garden. “I’m saving it,” he said sternly. “We’ll eat that.”

Really?

The plant looked like a bundle of long red worms, each with several green oval-shaped cartoon ears. It looked more like something suited for a compost pile than a cultivated garden. This drought had clearly taken a toll on Brockley’s mental state.

He picked up the plant I had just discarded, broke off two stems, and put one in his mouth. He held the other in front of my face, indicating that I was to follow his lead.

“It’s purslane,” he said as he chewed, “and it’s primo!”

I hesitantly took a bite and chewed it slowly. “Peppery,” I thought. The crunch felt like a snap pea with the skin of an apple. Then came a blast of citrus flavor. I would have told Brockley that I enjoyed it, but I couldn’t bring myself to interrupt his obvious state of food bliss. I simply looked on as he finished eating the entire plant…

Kay Young is a local legend among plant people. In 1993, she authored Wild Seasons: Gathering and Cooking Wild Plants of the Great Plains, and has been active in Lincoln’s gardening community for decades. The 82-year-old has dedicated her life to local folklore, horticulture, and ethnobotany. A quick tour of her backyard revealed a variety of nurtured plants that one would expect to see in a yard-waste bin…

“If you make a sandwich with mayonnaise or salad dressing, it doesn’t get wimpy the way lettuce does,” she said of purslane’s hardy leaves. “And in the summer, when the lettuce is getting bitter, purslane is still just wonderful.”..

A study by the Center for Genetics, Nutrition and Health, a nonprofit research organization in Washington, D.C., states that purslane is the “richest source of omega-3 fatty acids of any green leafy vegetable yet examined.”

An aside

“Purslane comes from India, where it was a food crop centuries ago. It was Gandhi’s favorite food. Now it also grows across America, and around the world.”

July 31, 2013 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , , | 7 Comments

Diets Lacking Omega-3s Lead to Anxiety, Hyperactivity in Teens: Generational Omega-3 Deficiencies Have Worsening Effects Over Time

From the 29 July 2013 Science Daily article

Diets lacking omega-3 fatty acids — found in foods like wild fish, some eggs, and grass-fed livestock — can have worsened effects over consecutive generations, especially affecting teens, according to a University of Pittsburgh study.

“We found that this dietary deficiency can compromise the behavioral health of adolescents, not only because their diet is deficient but because their parents’ diet was deficient as well. This is of particular concern because adolescence is a very vulnerable time for developing psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and addiction.”Diets lacking omega-3 fatty acids — found in foods like wild fish, eggs, and grass-fed livestock — can have worsened effects over consecutive generations, especially affecting teens, according to a University of Pittsburgh study.

“Our study shows that, while the omega-3 deficiency influences the behavior of both adults and adolescents, the nature of this influence is different between the age groups,” said Moghaddam. “We observed changes in areas of the brain responsible for decision making and habit formation.”

The team is now exploring epigenetics as a potential cause. This is a process in which environmental events influence genetic information. Likewise, the team is exploring markers of inflammation in the brain since omega-3 deficiencies causes an increase of omega-6 fats, which are proinflammatory molecules in the brain and other tissues.

“It’s remarkable that a relatively common dietary change can have generational effects,” said Moghaddam. “It indicates that our diet does not merely affect us in the short-term but also can affect our offspring.”

 

July 30, 2013 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Study Shows High-Fructose Diet Sabotages Learning, Memory

From the 17 May article at Medical News Today

Attention, college students cramming between midterms and finals: Binging on soda and sweets for as little as six weeks may make you stupid.

A new UCLA rat study is the first to show how a diet steadily high in fructose slows the brain, hampering memory and learning – and how omega-3 fatty acids can counteract the disruption. The peer-reviewed Journal of Physiology has published the findings.

“Our findings illustrate that what you eat affects how you think,” said Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and a professor of integrative biology and physiology in the UCLA College of Letters and Science. “Eating a high-fructose diet over the long term alters your brain’s ability to learn and remember information. But adding omega-3 fatty acids to your meals can help minimize the damage.” …

Gomez-Pinilla, a native of Chile and an exercise enthusiast who practices what he preaches, advises people to keep fructose intake to a minimum and swap sugary desserts for fresh berries and Greek yogurt, which he keeps within arm’s reach in a small refrigerator in his office. An occasional bar of dark chocolate that hasn’t been processed with a lot of extra sweetener is fine too, he said.

Still planning to throw caution to the wind and indulge in a hot-fudge sundae? Then also eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, walnuts and flaxseeds, or take a daily DHA capsule. Gomez-Pinilla recommends one gram of DHA per day.

“Our findings suggest that consuming DHA regularly protects the brain against fructose’s harmful effects,” said Gomez-Pinilla. “It’s like saving money in the bank. You want to build a reserve for your brain to tap when it requires extra fuel to fight off future diseases.”

May 17, 2012 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News, Nutrition | , , , , | Leave a comment

Alzheimer’s: Diet Patterns May Keep Brain from Shrinking

From the  29 December 2011 Science News Daily article

 People with diets high in several vitamins or in omega 3 fatty acids are less likely to have the brain shrinkage associated with Alzheimer’s disease than people whose diets are not high in those nutrients, according to a new study published in the December 28, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology…

Read entire article

December 30, 2011 Posted by | Nutrition, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

   

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