Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[News release] Public Access to NSF (National Science Foundation) Research

From the [March 2015] news release

The National Science Foundation (NSF or Foundation) has developed a plan outlining a framework for activities to increase public access to scientific publications and digital scientific data resulting from research the foundation funds. The plan, entitled “Today’s Data, Tomorrow’s Discoveries,” is consistent with the objectives set forth in the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Feb. 22, 2013, memorandum, “Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” and with long-standing policies encouraging data sharing and communication of research results.

As outlined in section 3.1 of the plan, NSF will require that either the version of record or the final accepted manuscript in peer-reviewed scholarly journals and papers in juried conference proceedings or transactions must:

  • Be deposited in a public access compliant repository designated by NSF;
  • Be available for download, reading and analysis free of charge no later than 12 months after initial publication;
  • Possess a minimum set of machine-readable metadata elements in a metadata record to be made available free of charge upon initial publication;
  • Be managed to ensure long-term preservation; and
  • Be reported in annual and final reports during the period of the award with a persistent identifier that provides links to the full text of the publication as well as other metadata elements.

This NSF requirement will apply to new awards resulting from proposals submitted, or due, on or after the effective date of the Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) that will be issued in January 2016.

March 21, 2015 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Medical Cases in literature : an open database

Reblog from the 12 December 2012 posting at  Science Intelligence and InfoPros

Open access (OA) publisher BioMed Central has launched a new semantically-enriched search tool, Cases Database, which aims to enhance the discovery, filtering and aggregation of medical case reports from many journals. OA to journal articles published under Creative Commons licences, which permit text mining, enable the literature to be reused as a resource for scientific discovery

More than 11,000 cases from 100 different journals are reportedly available to be freely searched with Cases Database.

Cases Database uses text mining and medical term recognition to filter peer reviewed medical case reports and provide a semantically enriched search experience. The database offers structured search and filtering by condition, symptom, intervention, pathogen, patient demographic and many other data fields, allowing fast identification of relevant case reports to support clinical practice and research. Registered users can save cases, set up e-mail alerts tonew cases matching their search terms, and export their results. Cases Database will be free to access and is expected to be of particular interest to practicing clinicians, researchers, lecturers, drug regulators, patients, students and authors.

Announcement:

http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcblog/2012/12/10/embrace-information-overload-with-cases-database/

 

http://www.casesdatabase.com/

 

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources, Educational Resources (Health Professionals) | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Scientists, Foundations, Libraries, Universities, and Advocates Unite and Issue New Recommendations to Make Research Freely Available to All Online

 

Those of you who follow my blog know this is one of my passions!

From the press release

September 12, 2012   Information Program

Scientists, Foundations, Libraries, Universities, and Advocates Unite and Issue New Recommendations to Make Research Freely Available to All Online

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 12, 2012

CONTACT: Andrea Higginbotham, SPARC, andrea@arl.org; 202-296-2296

Amy Weil, Open Society Foundations, aweil@sorosny.org; 212-548-0381

WASHINGTON—In response to the growing demand to make research free and available to anyone with a computer and an internet connection, a diverse coalition today issued new recommendations that could usher in huge advances in the sciences, medicine, and health.

The recommendations were developed by leaders of the Open Access movement, which has worked for the past decade to provide the public with unrestricted, free access to scholarly research—much of which is publicly funded. Making the research publicly available to everyone—free of charge and without most copyright and licensing restrictions—will accelerate scientific research efforts and allow authors to reach a larger number of readers…

 

September 17, 2012 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The White House Calls for Information on Public Access to Publications and Data « The Scholarly Kitchen

Office of Science and Technology Policy

The White House Calls for Information on Public Access to Publications and Data « The Scholarly Kitchen.

From the blog article at the Scholarly Kitchen

f you’re reading this blog, you likely have an opinion aboutopen access to journal articles and research results. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has put out two formal Requests for Information; one on the subject of “Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Publications” and the other on “Public Access to Digital Data.”

While most of us enjoy the seemingly endless back and forth discussion online (or ranting and raving, as the case may be), this is a chance for all stakeholders to have a direct influence where it matters most.  The White House is crafting requirements for recipients of federal research funding and the information received here will be crucial to setting policy.

There are two separate issues here, public access to journal articles from federally-funded research, and the tricky question of how to make the most of the raw data collected in those federally-funded experiments….

December 3, 2011 Posted by | Librarian Resources | , , , | Leave a comment

Impact of free access to the scientific literature, including empowerment of health care consumers

From the 21 July 2011 blog item at  Science Intelligence and InfoPros, by hbasset

An excellent review in the latest JMLA:

The paper reviews recent studies that evaluate the impact of free access (open access) on the behavior of scientists as authors, readers, and citers in developed and developing nations. (…)

  • Researchers report that their access to the scientific literature is generally good and improving (76% of researchers think that it is better now than 5 years ago)
  • Publishers (Elsevier and Oxford UP) reveal an increase in the number of journals available at a typical university and an even larger increase in the article downloads
  • For authors, the access status of a journal is not an important consideration when deciding where to publish (journal reputation is stronger)
  • The high cost of Western scientific journals poses a major barrier to researchers in developing nations
  • There is clear evidence that free access increases the number of article downloads, although its impact on article citations is not clear
  • Recent studies provide little evidence to support the idea that there is a crisis in access to the scholarly literature
  • Author’s resistance to publication fees is a major barrier to greater participation in open access initiatives
  • The empowerment of health care consumers through universal access to original research has ben cited as a key benefit of free access to the scientific literature
  • overall, the published evidence does not indicate how (or whether) free access to the scientific literature influences consumers’ reading or behavior
  • current research reveals no evidence of unmet demand for the primary medical or health sciences literature among the general public
  • most research on access to the scientific literature assumes a traditional and hierarchical flow of information from the publisher to the eader, with the library often serving ans an intermediary betwwen the two. Very little has been done to investigate alternative routes of access to the scientific literature

Davis, Philip M. & Walters, William H. The impact of free access to the scientific literature: a review of recent research. J Med Libr Assoc 99(3):208-17 (2011).
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21753913

available at:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133904/

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July 26, 2011 Posted by | Health Education (General Public), Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Posters from Life Sciences and Medicine Conferences and Meetings

The Faculty of 1,000 has a prototype site for their new open access F1000 Posters. This site will be a repository of posters from across the life sciences and medicine. Submissions are voluntary, but will only be  included  after a review process. In the future the site will have improved viewing of the posters, interactive tools, and full search capabilities.

From the Web site

ABOUT F1000 POSTERS

Our aim in building F1000 Posters is to give poster presenters and supporting societies the opportunity to make their work known to a wider audience. It will also enable much greater discussion on new research, hopefully opening up opportunities for new collaborations which will help advance scientific research as a whole. Posters deposited here will be reviewed by our world-renowned Faculty who will select posters that they consider to be particularly interesting and important and write evaluations for inclusion in our award-winning F1000 evaluation service.

A LOST RESOURCE

The early scientific information presented in conference posters is universally agreed to be an important resource but, unfortunately, it is almost always completely lost once a conference is over. As a result, posters are only viewed by a handful of people before they disappear, either forever or until the research is later published as a paper. Some important work may never get published, particularly if it focuses on negative results or case studies. The system of removing posters from view after a conference is over represents a vast loss to the scientific community of unique and potentially valuable information.

Posters advertising Faculty of 1000

For more information, contact Faculty of 1000, info@f1000.com

They  have other options, including

* We would be happy to send you professionally printed copies of the
posters – just tell us which size you prefer – small (A4) or large (A3)
– and the best mailing address to use
* We could send you banner-type versions of these posters to put on your
institutional pages as appropriate (or simply some text and a logo) –
just tell us what you require
* Additionally, do you know of any students who might be keen to earn a
little extra money by putting up a whole series of posters around all
the relevant departments on your campus? We would then mail them a
whole batch of printed posters.


October 2, 2010 Posted by | Biomedical Research Resources | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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