Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblog] Reducing Pain of Varicose Vein Surgery

Reducing pain of varicose vein surgery has been a priority of The Whiteley Clinic.(31 January 2015)

This latest research studied how pain and anxietycan be reduced under local anaesthetic varicose vein surgery. This sort of surgery is also called “keyhole” orendovenous surgery for varicose veins.Reducing pain of varicose vein surgery - Research from The Whiteley Clinic and University of Surrey

Reducing pain of varicose vein surgery – Research from The Whiteley Clinic and University of Surrey

The research showed that both:

  • one-to-one talking with a specific nurse
  • using a stress ball

both significantly reduced the pain and anxiety of the varicose vein surgery.Interesting, watching a DVD during the surgery reduced the anxiety, but not the pain of varicose vein surgery. Listening to music had no effect.
This study is part of the continuing research program that makes treatment at The Whiteley Clinic unique.This projectwas funded by The Whiteley Clinic andwas performed at our Whiteley Clinic, Guildford.The researcher, Briony Hudson,was supervised by Prof Jane Ogden at The University of Surrey and Prof Mark Whiteley. Her workhas been submitted to the University of Surrey and shewas awarded her PhD in Autumn 2014.The workis going to be published:

  • Hudson BF, Ogden J, Whiteley MS. Randomised Controlled Trial to Compare the Effect of Simple Distraction Interventions on Pain and Anxiety Experienced During Conscious Surgery. European Journal of Pain. 2015.

See link: http://www.medicaldaily.com/how-reduce-anxiety-and-pain-during-surgery-small-talk-and-stress-balls-320176

February 3, 2015 Posted by | health care | , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Press release] Study shows integrative medicine relieves pain and anxiety for cancer inpatients

 

Study shows integrative medicine relieves pain and anxiety for cancer inpatients.

From the 6 November 2014 EurekAlert!

 

Study shows integrative medicine relieves pain and anxiety for cancer inpatients

Pain is a common symptom of cancer and side effect of cancer treatment, and treating cancer-related pain is often a challenge for health care providers.

The Penny George Institute for Health and Healing researchers found that integrative medicine therapies can substantially decrease pain and anxiety for hospitalized cancer patients. Their findings are published in the current issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs.

“Following Integrative medicine interventions, such as medical massage, acupuncture, guided imagery or relaxation response intervention, cancer patients experienced a reduction in pain by an average of 47 percent and anxiety by 56 percent,” said Jill Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., lead author and Senior Scientific Advisor at the Penny George Institute.

“The size of these reductions is clinically important, because theoretically, these therapies can be as effective as medications, which is the next step of our research,” said Jeffery Dusek, Ph.D., senior author and Research Director for the Penny George Institute.

The Penny George Institute receives funding from the National Center of Alternative and Complementary Medicine of the National Institutes of Health to study the impact of integrative therapies on pain over many hours as well as over the course of a patient’s entire hospital stay.

“The overall goal of this research is to determine how integrative services can be used with or instead of narcotic medications to control pain,” Johnson said.

Researchers looked at electronic medical records from admissions at Abbott Northwestern Hospital between July 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. From more than ten thousand admissions, researchers identified 1,833 in which cancer patients received integrative medicine services.

Patients were asked to report their pain and anxiety before and just after the integrative medicine intervention, which averaged 30 minutes in duration.

Patients being treated for lung, bronchus, and trachea cancers showed the largest percentage decrease in pain (51 percent). Patients with prostate cancer reported the largest percentage decrease in anxiety (64 percent).

November 9, 2014 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

[FDA Consumer Update] Pain Medicines for Pets: Know the Risks

From the 5 November 2013 FDA Consumer Update

Pain Medicines for Pets: Know the Risks

 
Walking dog on beach (350x397)

Your 9-year-old German Shepherd is limping, and you think that arthritis may be setting in. A trip to the veterinarian proves that you’re right—it’s osteoarthritis, a degeneration of the cartilage and bone that affects joints. The veterinarian prescribes a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

NSAIDs are a class of drugs extensively used in both human and veterinary medicine for their anti-fever, anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties, and they are the most commonly prescribed pain relievers for animals. Inflammation—the body’s response to irritation or injury—is characterized by redness, warmth, swelling, and pain. NSAIDs work by blocking the production of chemicals produced by the body that play a role in inflammation.

“Scientists consider NSAIDs the cornerstone of osteoarthritis therapy in dogs,” says Melanie McLean, D.V.M., a veterinarian at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Some NSAIDS are also used to manage pain after surgery in both dogs and cats. No NSAID has been approved for long-term use in cats.

NSAIDs carry risks as well as benefits, however, and all dogs and cats should undergo a thorough physical examination by a veterinarian—including a discussion of the pet’s medical history— before beginning NSAID therapy. McLean notes that it’s also important that you talk to your veterinarian about possible side effects, including those that could signal danger.

Risks and Side Effects

NSAIDS are associated with gastrointestinal ulcers/perforations, kidney, and liver toxicity (damage done by exposure to medications or chemicals) and must be used cautiously in animals with pre-existing kidney or liver problems.

Because most liver-associated toxicities occur during the first three weeks, it’s especially important to closely monitor the results of blood tests during the early stages of long-term NSAID treatment in dogs. Also, before starting long-term treatment with NSAIDs in dogs, blood tests should be conducted to establish baseline data and then repeated on a regular basis. McLean recommends that you talk with your veterinarian about how often this blood work should be done.

Some of the most common side effects of NSAIDS in animals reported to FDA are:

  • vomiting
  • decreased to no appetite
  • decreased activity level
  • diarrhea

While your animal is taking NSAIDs, continuously monitor the pet for these side effects as well as looking for blood in the feces, tar-like stools, yellowing of the whites of the eyes, or yellowing of the gums. If you see these, call your veterinarian immediately, McLean says. Other reported side effects include stomach and intestinal ulcers, intestinal perforation (a hole in the wall of the intestine), kidney failure, liver failure and death.

Giving two NSAIDs at the same time, or giving an NSAID with a steroid, such as prednisone, can significantly increase the risk and severity of side effects, especially gastrointestinal toxicity.

Risks associated with NSAIDs are detailed on the package inserts and the client information sheets that accompany all FDA-approved veterinary oral NSAIDs.

Are OTC Meds for People Safe for Pets?

McLean says that it’s not unusual for pet owners to want to give their animals NSAIDs or acetaminophen (Tylenol and other brands, which are not NSAIDs) straight from their own medicine cabinets. “Many people don’t realize that a medicine that’s safe for people may not be safe for dogs or cats, or that a dose that is safe for people may not be safe for their pets,” she notes.

In fact, some over-the-counter (OTC) human pain relievers can be toxic, or even deadly, in pets. McLean suggests that you check with your veterinarian first if you want to give your animal OTC human drugs.

“You should always check with your veterinarian first before giving your animal any kind of medication, prescription or over-the-counter,” she notes. Similarly, pet owners should not assume that a medicine that is safe for one animal is necessarily safe for another.

Communication with your veterinarian is essential. Before giving your animal an NSAID:

  • Make sure you know what the medication is being prescribed for, how much to give and how long to give it.
  • Discuss possible side effects and symptoms, especially those that require an immediate call to the vet.
  • Tell your veterinarian if the pet has a history of gastrointestinal problems, such as stomach ulcers, or surgery on the stomach or intestines.
  • Tell your veterinarian if your pet is on any other medications or supplements.

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

Nov. 5, 2013

 

November 6, 2013 Posted by | Pet Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Better chronic pain management

From the 15 August Eureka news item

Pain care management needs to be improved, with health care professionals committing to improve care as well as a retooling of the health care system to help people who are suffering, states an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (pre-embargo link only) http://www.cmaj.ca/site/embargo/cmaj111065.pdf.

According to a recent analysis, chronic pain affects people of all ages, with an estimated 500,000 Canadians aged 12 to 44 years, 38% of seniors in long-term care institutions and 27% of seniors living at home experiencing regular pain.

“Experts agree that much can be done now with newer analgesics, nonpharmacologic techniques such as nerve blocks and physical therapies, as well as spiritual and supportive care,” write Drs. Noni MacDonald, Ken Flegel, Paul Hébert and Matthew Stanbrook. “Availability of quality care for pain is the major problem. Health professionals have not mounted a response commensurate with the magnitude of the problem.”

The authors argue for a broad strategy to help increase pain management expertise, including education, technology, and supported self-care and lay coaching.

 

 

August 16, 2011 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , | 1 Comment

   

%d bloggers like this: