Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Health Care Consumerism: Patients Still Lack Agency at the Point of Care | Health care and the digital revolution

Health Care Consumerism: Patients Still Lack Agency at the Point of Care | Health care and the digital revolution.

From the 27 January 2013 post at Health care and the digital revolution — A graduate student’s take on health care going digital – Claudia Paz

Something we have been hearing a lot of lately is how this is the moment for the healthcare consumer (see, Bloomberg Review videoMedCity Article, Forbes article on trends to be excited about).  Basically, people are noting that EMR’s and patient portals, the proliferation of health and wellness related mobile apps, and greater transparency across the system, will all lead to a new age of health care where patients have the information and tools to savvily navigate a streamlined healthcare delivery system oiled by customer reviews, online tools, and digital gadgets. Think Yelp and MenuPages meets healthcare.

While all of the trends listed above are exciting leaps forward, not enough attention is being paid to the patient’s needs at the point of care. Research on patient activation andshared or participatory decision making all points to the following:

Empowered patients who actively participate in decisions about their health and treatment options are more likely to be compliant with their medications, make less risky and more cost effective decisions, and are more confident in the management of their health outcomes.

For the purposes of this blog, I am focusing on the concept of a patient as an active participant at the point of care. From my own personal experience, it seems that “doctor knows best” remains the dominant paradigm. Instead of having a conversation about treatment options, the pros and cons of alternatives, variations in costs and side affects, I am more often than not prescribed a medication or treatment option and sent about my day. If I feel like knowing more about the medication (that I have already agreed to take), I usually conduct research after the appointment.

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January 30, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Trends For Health CIOs In 2014 – InformationWeek

5 Trends For Health CIOs In 2014 – InformationWeek.

From the 23 December 2013 article at Information Week Health Care

Patient portals, direct messaging, and medical identity theft will keep healthcare execs on their toes in the new year.

Hackers Outsmart Pacemakers, Fitbits: Worried Yet?

Hackers Outsmart Pacemakers, Fitbits: Worried Yet?

(click image for larger view)

As healthcare CIOs are well aware, 2014 promises to be the year of “the perfect storm.” The potential impact of ICD-10 and Meaningful Use Stage 2, coupled with the transition to value-based reimbursement and new-care-delivery models, promise to overwhelm their budgets and burn out their already overworked staffs.

Nevertheless, there are some other trends healthcare CIOs should pay attention to in 2014, partly because of their bearing on the main events. Here are five significant trends.

1. Patient portals
Because of rising consumer interest in health IT, the industry transition to accountable care, and most of all, Meaningful Use Stage 2, patient portals are hot. Nearly 50% of hospitals and 40% of ambulatory practices already provide patient portals, according to a Frost & Sullivan report. The firm predicted that the value of the portal business would soar to nearly $900 million in 2017, up 221% from its worth in 2012.

[ What Obamacare sites can learn from online retail stores: Health Insurance Exchanges Struggle To Charm Customers. ]

KLAS Research, in a poll of 200 healthcare organizations, found that MU Stage 2 had made patient portals a “must-have” technology for doctors and hospitals. The government EHR incentive program requires providers to allow patients to access their health records electronically. In addition, providers must send care reminders and education materials to at least 10% of their patients. All of these tasks are most easily done through portals attached to EHRs. But there’s also some interest in untethered, standalone portals that can help patients assemble their records from multiple providers in one place.

 

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Read the entire article here

 

January 2, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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