Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Financial help with prescription drug/medical costs through the government, nonprofits, and corporations

Low income people may qualify for assistance through government, nonprofit, or corporate programs. Check out the Financial Help section of the UT Library Consumer Health Library Guide.

http://libguides.utoledo.edu/ConsumerHealth/financial_help

For general health information, check out Health Information for All
by the author of this blog.

Cannot find what you are looking for through the above links? Feel free to email me and
I will do my best to reply within 48 hours.  jmflahiff at yahoo dot com

 

 

October 28, 2018 Posted by | Consumer Health, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

How to save against jaw-dropping prescription drug prices

How to save against jaw-dropping prescription drug prices July 17, 2015 by Danielle Braff, Chicago Tribune

From the article

Pharmaceutical experts clued us in on how to get the biggest discounts at the pharmacy counter.

Shop around: A 2013 study by Consumer Reports found that doing a little comparison shopping can have a big payoff, especially if you’re paying out of pocket for your medications. The study found a $749 difference between the highest- and lowest-priced stores when shopping for a month’s supply of five drugs. Costco was the least expensive (and you don’t have to be a member to use its pharmacy), while CVS, Target and Rite Aid were the most expensive.

Be proactive about getting the generic version: Ask if there are generic or less-expensive brand-name drugs that would work just as well as the prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking now,” Engle said. “If a generic is not available, check to see if you can use a therapeutic alternative, which is a similar drug that gives the same result that is available as a generic.”

Split pills: Check with your pharmacist to see if your medication is safe to split and — if it is available in a variety of strengths that cost about the same amount.

Read the entire article here

Related Resource

Prescription drug cost assistance (from Health Resources for All Edited by Janice Flahiff)
Including

  • Partnership for Prescription Assistance is a directory which helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines they need for free or nearly free.
  • Extra Help (program thru the US Social Security Administration for limited income people)
  • NeedyMeds – Non-profit information resource devoted to helping people in need find assistance programs to help them afford their medications and costs related to health care. Includes coverage gap programs.

July 25, 2015 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, health care | , , | Leave a comment

[Medical Journal Editorial] Using Drugs to Discriminate — Adverse Selection in the Insurance Marketplace

From the Perspective article by Douglas B. Jacobs, Sc.B., and Benjamin D. Sommers, M.D., Ph.D.at the 5 Feburary edition of the New England Journal of Medicine

Eliminating discrimination on the basis of preexisting conditions is one of the central features of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Before the legislation was passed, insurers in the nongroup market regularly charged high premiums to people with chronic conditions or denied them coverage entirely. To address these problems, the ACA instituted age-adjusted community rating for premiums and mandated that plans insure all comers. In combination with premium subsidies and the Medicaid expansion, these policies have resulted in insurance coverage for an estimated 10 million previously uninsured people in 2014.1

There is evidence, however, that insurers are resorting to other tactics to dissuade high-cost patients from enrolling. A formal complaint submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in May 2014 contended that Florida insurers offering plans through the new federal marketplace (exchange) had structured their drug formularies to discourage people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from selecting their plans. These insurers categorized all HIV drugs, including generics, in the tier with the highest cost sharing.2

Insurers have historically used tiered formularies to encourage enrollees to select generic or preferred brand-name drugs instead of higher-cost alternatives. But if plans place all HIV drugs in the highest cost-sharing tier, enrollees with HIV will incur high costs regardless of which drugs they take. This effect suggests that the goal of this approach — which we call “adverse tiering” — is not to influence enrollees’ drug utilization but rather to deter certain people from enrolling in the first place.

We found evidence of adverse tiering in 12 of the 48 plans — 7 of the 24 plans in the states with insurers listed in the HHS complaint and 5 of the 24 plans in the other six states (see theSupplementary Appendix for sample formularies). The differences in out-of-pocket HIV drug costs between adverse-tiering plans (ATPs) and other plans were stark (seegraphAverage HIV-Related Costs for Adverse-Tiering Plans (ATPs) versus Other Plans.). ATP enrollees had an average annual cost per drug of more than triple that of enrollees in non-ATPs ($4,892 vs. $1,615), with a nearly $2,000 difference even for generic drugs. Fifty percent of ATPs had a drug-specific deductible, as compared with only 19% of other plans. Even after factoring in the lower premiums in ATPs and the ACA’s cap on out-of-pocket spending, we estimate that a person with HIV would pay more than $3,000 for treatment annually in an ATP than in another plan.

Our findings suggest that many insurers may be using benefit design to dissuade sicker people from choosing their plans. A recent analysis of insurance coverage for several other high-cost chronic conditions such as mental illness, cancer, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis showed similar evidence of adverse tiering, with 52% of marketplace plans requiring at least 30% coinsurance for all covered drugs in at least one class.3 Thus, this phenomenon is apparently not limited to just a few plans or conditions.

Adverse tiering is problematic for two reasons. First, it puts substantial and potentially unexpected financial strain on people with chronic conditions. These enrollees may select an ATP for its lower premium, only to end up paying extremely high out-of-pocket drug costs. These costs may be difficult to anticipate, since calculating them would require knowing an insurer’s negotiated drug prices — information that is not publicly available for most plans.

Second, these tiering practices will most likely lead to adverse selection over time, with sicker people clustering in plans that don’t use adverse tiering for their medical conditions.

Read the entire Perspective here

February 6, 2015 Posted by | Consumer Health, Public Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Reblog] Discount drug pricing: Cutting through the controversy

From the 4 February 2015 article through the Association of Health Care Journalists

pricey-pills1

Independent journalist Lola Butcher reports that debate about the government’s 340B Drug Pricing Program continues to build as the program expands.

“Like all good controversies, this one has enthusiastic advocates and wild-eyed opponents, and it’s easy to get snagged by the passion of the partisans,” she writes in a new tip sheet.

The program, which started in 1992, requires pharmaceutical companies to sell outpatient drugs to eligible health care organizations at significantly reduced prices.

Over the years, the eligibility criteria to participate has expanded repeatedly. Currently, safety-net hospitals, children’s hospitals, critical access hospitals, federal health centers and other organizations are eligible; organizations that fall into those categories must register and enroll in the 340B program.

Butcher, as a 2014 AHCJ Reporting Fellow on Health Care Performance, wrote about the migration of cancer care from physician-owned clinics and community centers to hospital outpatient departments. She found that the 340B program helped fuel that trend.

In this tip sheet for reporters, she explains the program, including the program’s winners and losers, how much money is involved and story ideas.

 

February 5, 2015 Posted by | health care | , | Leave a comment

[News] The coming revolution in much cheaper life-saving drugs | Medication Health News

The coming revolution in much cheaper life-saving drugs | Medication Health News.

From the 22 January 2015 post

ID-10057221Recently the FDA has approved the first “biosimilars” to be available in the United States.  In order for a drug to be considered biosimilar, the law requires that the copycat drug is “highly similar” to the reference drug, and does not have “clinically meaningful” differences. Biosimilar drugs will offer lower-cost competition as they tend to cost between 20 – 30 % less than the original branded drug. According to the Federal Trade Comission, Biosimilar products are estimated to take 8 to 10 years to develop and will cost the manufacturers up to $200 million to produce.With this new class of drugs, patients will be able to save thousands on their medications. Has your company/employer began exploring the budgetary effects of biosimilars? How will this new class of biosimilars affect health care spending in the US?

For additional information click here

Photo courtesy of [ddpavumba]  freedigitalphotos.net

January 26, 2015 Posted by | health care | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DocuBase Article: Trading Away Access to Medicines – Revisited

DocuBase Article: Trading Away Access to Medicines – Revisited.

From the abstract

Tuesday, 13th January 2015
Trading Away Access to Medicines – Revisited
Source: Oxfam International

Screen Shot 2015-01-23 at 12.29.50 PM

From Summary:

The failure of the current pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) system is revealed by the World Health Organization (WHO) alert about the lack of effective medicines to address antimicrobial resistance, and the absence of a treatment for the deadly Ebola virus that is ravaging communities in West Africa at the time of writing.

While low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have being suffering from a lack of access to medicines for years, European public health systems have become unable to bear the burden of expensive new medicines. The rise of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is affecting all people, but is more acutely hitting developing countries that are still struggling with the unfinished business of communicable diseases. Meanwhile, European health systems, badly hit by austerity measures, are under pressure to deliver more with less money, against a backdrop of rising medicine prices.

The European Union (EU) could play a leading role in improving pharmaceutical innovation and access to medicines around the world. However, the European Commission (EC) has implemented a trade agenda that favours the commercial interests of the multinational pharmaceutical industry over the health of people in LMICs. Such trade policies have triggered an outcry from European citizens, experts and organizations, who are asking for the public interest to be prioritized in trade discussions.

Opening statement
Screen Shot 2015-01-23 at 12.31.24 PM

January 23, 2015 Posted by | health care | , , , , | Leave a comment

High-Cost Generic Drugs — Implications for Patients and Policymakers — NEJM

High-Cost Generic Drugs — Implications for Patients and Policymakers — NEJM.

Excerpt

It is well known that new brand-name drugs are often expensive, but U.S. health care is also witnessing a lesser-known but growing and seemingly paradoxical phenomenon: certain older drugs, many of which are generic and not protected by patents or market exclusivity, are now also extremely expensive. Take the case of albendazole, a broad-spectrum antiparasitic medication. Albendazole was first marketed by a corporate predecessor to GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) outside the United States in 1982 and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1996. Its patents have long since expired, but no manufacturer ever sought FDA approval for a generic version. One reason may be that the primary indications for the drug — intestinal parasites, neurocysticercosis, and hydatid disease — occur relatively rarely in the United States and usually only in disadvantaged populations such as immigrants and refugees. In late 2010, the listed average wholesale price (AWP) for albendazole was $5.92 per typical daily dose in the United States and less than $1 per typical daily dose overseas.

….

 

Meanwhile, there is little that individual consumers can do. Some drug companies, such as Amedra, offer assistance programs for indigent patients, but these programs often have complicated enrollment processes, and they do not offer an effective general safety net.5 Some patients instead seek to acquire these drugs in other countries, since many of them are widely and inexpensively available outside the United States, but such foreign sources may be of variable quality. Until regulatory and market solutions are implemented to reduce prices for these older drugs, patients requiring such drugs and the physicians treating them will continue to be faced with difficult choices.

November 25, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , | Leave a comment

[News item] Canada paying more than double for common generic drugs, study says | Metro

Canada paying more than double for common generic drugs, study says | Metro.

From the 14 October article

Canada is paying more than double for six commonly used generic drugs compared with other developed countries because of a “highly unusual” purchasing plan, according to a new study released Tuesday.

Researchers found that through a mix of negotiations with drug companies and calls for tender, countries such as New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Germany are paying less than Canada for generic medications that treat everything from high blood pressure to depression. It’s all thanks to a model the author of the study, Amir Attaran, calls “a uniquely Canadian stupidity.”

The model implemented by the provinces and territories (except for Quebec) in April 2013 simply sets the price for the six generic drugs at 18 per cent of the price of the brand-name versions. At the time, the premiers, under the auspices of the Council of the Federation, said the six drugs represented 20 per cent of publicly funded spending on generic drugs and that the new spending plan was expected to save up to $100 million.

“The Canadian approach of setting a single price ceiling for multiple medicines is highly unusual,” says the study. “All other countries studied here have preferred competition or negotiation to varying extents.”

………..

October 16, 2014 Posted by | Health News Items | , , , , | Leave a comment

[News Article] The Steep cost of Life Saving Drugs

Medication Health News

ID-10057221 With many new drugs being brought to market, there has been increased talk about the pricing of many agents. Today, drugs in question include Evzio, a new naloxone auto-injector and  Sovaldi, a new antiviral for hepatitis C. These agents could save many lives, but their potential high costs could be a barrier to many of the patients of need. How should we solve this dilemma?  Should the subsidies be provided to those in need of these therapies?  What are your thoughts?

For additional information, please see the news analysis in the New York Times.

Image courtesy of [ddpavumba]/FreeDigitalPhotos.Net

View original post

May 2, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , | Leave a comment

US Government Program requires drug manufacturers to provide outpatient drugs to eligible health care organizations/covered entities at significantly reduced prices

New to me!

From the US Health Resources and Services Program Web page –  340B Drug Pricing Program & Pharmacy Affairs

The 340B Drug Pricing Program requires drug manufacturers to provide outpatient drugs to eligible health care organizations/covered entities at significantly reduced prices.

The 340B Program enables covered entities to stretch scarce Federal resources as far as possible, reaching more eligible patients and providing more comprehensive services.

Eligible health care organizations/covered entities are defined in statute and include HRSA-supported health centers and look-alikes, Ryan White clinics and State AIDS Drug Assistance programs, Medicare/Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospitals, children’s hospitals, and other safety net providers. See the full list of eligible organizations/covered entities.

To participate in the 340B Program, eligible organizations/covered entities must register and be enrolled with the 340B program and comply with all 340B Program requirements. Once enrolled, covered entities are assigned a 340B identification number that vendors verify before allowing an organization to purchase 340B discounted drugs.

New registrations are accepted October 1-15, January 1-15, April 1-15 and July 1-15.

Update here, which includes..

HRSA is currently working to formalize existing program guidance through regulation, designed to cover a number of aspects of the 340B Program. The regulation currently under development will address the definition of an eligible patient, compliance requirements for contract pharmacy arrangements, hospital eligibility criteria, and eligibility of off-site facilities. We expect to publish this proposed regulation, which will be open for public comment, by June 2014. In order to ensure that covered entities retain flexibility based on their size, structure, and patient population, HRSA will continue to hold covered entities accountable for implementing those requirements as appropriate for their specific circumstances.

…..

Implemenation page includes

Once a covered equity is enrolled in the 340B Program and included in the covered entities database, it is the covered entity’s responsibility to inform wholesalers and manufacturers of enrollment in order to purchase drugs at the 340B discounted price.

Covered entities may continue to work directly with individual wholesalers and manufacturers and may participate in the 340B Prime Vendor Program (PVP). As the government’s awarded 340B Prime Vendor, Apexus is responsible for securing sub-ceiling discounts on outpatient drug purchases and discounts on other pharmacy related products and services for covered entities electing to join the PVP. For complete information, see the Prime Vendor Program .

Implementation Options

HRSA does not specify how participants should implement the 340B Program. As long as participants comply with all 340B Program requirements, they have flexibility in implementing the 340B Program.

Most covered entities choose one or more of the following options:

  • In-House Pharmacy, in which the covered entity owns drugs, pharmacy and license; purchases drugs; is fiscally responsible for the pharmacy; and pays pharmacy staff.
  • Contract Pharmacy Services, in which the covered entity owns drugs; purchases drugs; pays (or arranges for patients to pay) dispensing fees to one or more contract pharmacies; and contracts with pharmacy to provide pharmacy services.
  • Provider/In-House Dispensing, in which the covered entity owns drugs; employs providers licensed in the state to dispense; holds a license for dispensing for the participating providers; and is fiscally responsible for operating and dispensing costs.
  • Alternative Methods Demonstration Project, in which HRSA Office of Pharmacy Affairs approves a model proposed by the covered entity, such as a network of 340B covered entities.

The 340B Database includes links to

 

 

 

 

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February 2, 2014 Posted by | health care | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Drug discount cards: Tips and tricks to watch out for

English: ancillary personal at work in a drugstore

English: ancillary personal at work in a drugstore (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At our local Area Office on Aging I am a trained counselor through the Ohio Department of Insurance. In the past few months clients have been asking about drug discount cards.  Many marketing materials are very misleading .
Have hopefully been giving folks enough ways to look at the materials critically so they can decide. Going to refer folks to this. Already have added it to my Health/Medical News & Resources Web site. 

 

Drug discount cards: Tips and tricks to watch out for.

From the KevinMD.com post  by  | MEDS | SEPTEMBER 17, 2013

The finances behind drug discount cards

The amount you pay when using a drug discount card is the sum of four components. This is true for all drug discount cards.

1. The negotiated discounted price. The PBM does its best to negotiate the best discount from the pharmacies. Some PBMs do a better job of this than others. The size of the PBM, its market share, and how much business it will direct to the pharmacy are all important factors in the overall final discount.

2. Pharmacy transaction fee. Each time a card is used the pharmacy earns a small amount to help cover their costs.

3. PBM transaction fee. The amount the PBM earns to cover their costs of setting and running the pharmacy network, processing claims, etc.

4. Marketer fee. This is how much the marketer earns for promoting and distributing the card.

Who pays all these fees? You do!

Why pharmacies accept drug discount cards

You may wonder why pharmacies accept drug discount cards. After all, wouldn’t they make more by not accepting the cards and charging customers the non-discount price? There are five reasons pharmacies accept the cards.

1. Earning a profit even at the discounted price. They wouldn’t offer such a large discount that they lose money on the transaction.

2. Selling prescriptions they wouldn’t sell otherwise. For example, a customer may not be able to afford a prescription with a non-discounted price of $100 but may be able to afford it at the discounted price. The pharmacy gets the sale, but earns a lower profit.

3. Building customer loyalty. The drugstore business is very competitive. If a pharmacy gives you a good discount with a drug discount card you are more likely to continue to patronize that store than others.

4. Increased non-pharmaceutical purchases. There’s a reason why most pharmacies are at the back of the drugstore. This arrangement forces you to walk down aisles, increasing the chances you will make additional purchases.

5. Peer pressure. If all the pharmacies in town but one accept drug discount cards, that one will lose business.

How marketers make money

There are two main ways card marketers make money from drug discount cards and items you should watch out for.

1. Transaction fees. Each time a marketer’s card is used the marketer earns a transaction fee designed to cover expenses and make a profit. The size of the fee varies quite a bit. Generally speaking, non-profit companies and marketers that don’t have expensive marketing programs have lower transaction fees. Lower fees mean more savings for card users. Remember, card users pay the fees.

2. Selling of information. Some card marketers gather personal information on people who use their card. They can do this if you have to register to obtain a card. They can also receive personal information each time you use the card. For example, a company selling diabetic supplies would pay for a list of names and addresses of people who buy insulin.

Buyer beware

Here are some tips when selecting a drug discount card.

1. Never pay for a card. There are many good cards that are free. There is no reason to pay for a card since it’s unlikely it would offer a discount any better than a free one.

2. Never register for a card. This is one way marketers get info that they sell. The only reason to give your name and address is if the card is being mailed to you.

3. Read the privacy policy. Make sure the marketer has a privacy policy that you agree with. Even then, there’ no guarantee they will follow it.

4. Helpline. All reputable marketers have a toll-free helpline. Give the line a call and see how responsive they are. Do they have real people answering your questions or just a recording? If you leave a message do they call you back?

5. Shop around. Try different cards to see which offers you the best discount. Ask your pharmacist which has the best prices.

6. Consider who is making money. All things being equal, using a card offered by a non-profit is best. Any money they make is going to further their cause while the money earned by a for-profit is just going into someone’s pocket.

Richard J. Sagall, is president and co-founder, NeedyMeds.

This post originally appeared on the Costs of Care Blog.Costs of Care is a 501c3 nonprofit that is transforming American healthcare delivery by empowering patients and their caregivers to deflate medical bills. Follow us on Twitter @costsofcare.

October 26, 2013 Posted by | health care | , | Leave a comment

Some Prescription Drug Cost Assistance Programs

Recently I updated my Health Resources for All Web site.

If anyone has any suggestions (including additions), please let me know in the comments section or email me at jmflahiff at yahoo dot com.

 

Here’s the list from Prescription Drug Cost Assistance

[Sorry, it did not copy/paste very well!!]

General Guides

BenefitsCheckUp, a service of the National Council on Aging, can help you find public and private programs that may be able to help pay for your prescription drugs.

Government Programs

Extra Help (sometimes called the Low-Income Subsidy, LIS)

Find a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan (Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
Helps find prescription drug coverage regardless of income, health status, or how you pay for prescription drugs today.Click here for when you may enroll.  Additional information on Part D prescription drug plans here.

Nonprofits and Commercial Programs

NeedyMeds

  • Non-profit information resource devoted to helping people in need find assistance programs to help them afford their medications and costs related to health care. Includes coverage gap programs.

(More at their About pagePrintable brochure here)

             Contact them through their Web site or by telephone (800-503-6897)
 
  • A way to receive discounts on prescription drugs at participting pharmacies. 
  • Printable coupon at Web site
  • Contact by email or phone (1-888-412-0869). FAQ page here.
  • How it Works
    1. Use FreeRxPlus® Bin and Group numbers for FREE access to savings on prescriptions, lab tests, and imaging services.
    2. For access to Lab Test savings: Locate a lab or order your test call toll-free 1-888-412-0869
    3. For access to Imaging Savings: Locate an imaging center or order your service call toll-free 1-888-412-0869
    4. For access to Prescription Savings: Click HERE and locate a participating pharmacy or search for medication pricing. Then simply present your FreeRxPlus® card to the pharmacist for immediate saving
 A collaboration of pharmaceutical companies, health care providers and advocacy organizations. 

Use their services online or contact them at 1-888-477-2669Prescription Assistance Page includes


 PatientAssistance.com, Inc

PatientAssistance.com is a free resource designed to help connect patients who can’t afford their prescription medications with patient assistance programs. Generally for the uninsured and underinsured.

 Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF)

1-800-532-5274

The PAF helps to solve health insurance and access problems. The website has information on resources, programs, and provides personal help. PAF offers assistance to patients with specific issues they are facing with their insurer, employer and/or creditor regarding insurance, job retention and/or debt crisis matters relative to their diagnosis of life threatening or debilitating diseases.

Services provided by PAF include:

  • CINV CareLine

    CINV (chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting) CareLine is a patient hotline designed to provide case management assistance to patients diagnosed with cancer and experiencing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting who are seeking education and access to care.

  • Co-Pay Relief Program

    The Co-Pay Relief Program currently provides direct financial support to insured patients, including Medicare Part D beneficiaries, who must financially and medically qualify to access pharmaceutical co-payment assistance. The program offers personal service to all patients through the use of call counselors; personally guiding patients through the enrollment process

RxAssist

RxAssist is a website with information, news, and a database that are all designed to help you find out about ways to get affordable, or free, medications. The database includes information on the pharmaceutical companies’ patient assistance programs, or programs that provide free medication to low-income patients. RxAssist was created by Volunteers in Health Care, a national, nonprofit resource center for health care programs working with the uninsured.

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Patient Assistance Program may be able to help you find free or reduced-fee prescription drugs for your condition.

Prescription Drug Assistance Programs(American Cancer Society)

RxHope: Patient Assistance Information(Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America)

 

 

August 30, 2013 Posted by | Finding Aids/Directories, Librarian Resources | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Now Indians Can Compare Prices of Branded Drugs on Mobile Phones

 

Now Indians Can Compare Prices of Branded Drugs on Mobile Phones

From the 19 July article at Digitial Medicine

Consumer mHealth is here. There has been a spurt of entrepreneurship in this field and some Indian phone/ mobile based start-ups have been launched over the past couple of years. Mainly, they have been services meant to connect healthcare consumers with doctors via phone (like Ask a Doctor from Vodafone, Mediphone by Religare technologies,  Dial UR Doctor  and Mera Doctor). Most of these tools are voice based and sometimes don’t even fit the rigid definitions of mHealth. Further, they are all healthcare professional specific and have pointedly ignored patients in any decision making process.

Not that all mHealth projects in India are in the private sector. The government of India has also been active in harnessing the reach of mobile phones in the country with some projects in Public health like in ensuring treatment compliance in DOTS Program and in healthcare reporting at grass roots level. …

..

The latest mHealth project by the government of India looks to strike at the alleged root of costly medical care : the widely variable costs of branded drugs. The Indian government has taken the initiative to use simple messaging services (SMS) to educate the public on drug prices.

Here is how it works: Once the person sends a text message of the prescribed brand of drug to a particular number from his mobile, he will receive two to three options of the same medicine, along with the price differential. Say, a patient is prescribed a popular anti-infective like Augmentin (GlaxoSmithKline). He types in Augmentin and sends the SMS to the designated number. He would get a return SMS, possibly mentioning Moxikind CV (Mankind), which is substantially cheaper. But sources said that all responses would come with a caution: please consult the doctor before popping the alternative (pill).

 

September 17, 2012 Posted by | Health News Items | , , , , | Leave a comment

Question the price of drugs and medical procedures (Suggestions for Additional Resources Most Welcome!)

English: This image depicts the total health c...

This image depicts the total health care services expenditure per capita, in U.S. dollars PPP-adjusted, for the nations of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States with the years 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2007 compared.

February 18, 2012 Posted by | health care | , , | Leave a comment

   

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