Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

A blend of soy and dairy proteins promotes muscle protein synthesis when consumed after exercise

From the 24 January 2013 EurkAlert

A blend of proteins supplies amino acids to muscles and extends growth and repair

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 24, 2013 – A new study published in The Journal of Nutrition demonstrates the benefits of consuming a protein blend for muscle protein synthesis after exercise. This study is a first-of-its-kind, conducted by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch, and utilizes the proteins from soy, whey and casein consumed after an acute bout of resistance exercise. These proteins have complementary amino acid profiles and different digestion rates (amino acid release profiles). The results demonstrate prolonged delivery of amino acids to muscles and extended muscle protein synthesis when subjects consumed the blend, compared to a single source of protein alone.

“Sources of high-quality protein contain all the essential amino acids and have individual characteristics thought to offer a unique advantage for muscle growth,” said Blake Rasmussen, Ph.D., interim chair, Department of Nutrition & Metabolism and principal investigator of the study. “This is the first study to test the effects of combining soy with the dairy proteins, whey and casein, for promotion of lean body mass gain.”…

For more information on the study, the following is a link to the study on the Journal of Nutrition site. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/early/recent

Solae™ soy-based ingredient solutions help create nutritious, great-tasting products with a unique combination of functional, nutritional, economical and sustainable benefits. Solae, LLC, originally a DuPont joint venture, was fully acquired by DuPont on May 1, 2012, and is now part of DuPont Nutrition & Health, a world leader in specialty food ingredients. For more information, visitwww.Solae.com, or follow us on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/SolaeLLC, Facebook at www.Facebook.com/SolaeLLC, and LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/company/Solae-LLC.

 

Read the entire article here

 

January 25, 2013 Posted by | Nutrition | , , | Leave a comment

Seaweed: An Alternative Protein Source

Dulse, edible algae

Dulse, edible algae (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

From the 12 October 2012 article at Science News Daily

 

Teagasc researchers are looking to seaweed for proteins with health benefits for use as functional foods. Historically, edible seaweeds were consumed by coastal communities across the world and today seaweed is a habitual diet in many countries, particularly in Asia. Indeed, whole seaweeds have been successfully added to foods in recent times, ranging from sausages and cheese to pizza bases and frozen-meat products.

Source of protein

Researchers have previously shown that protein-rich red seaweeds such as Palmaria palmata (common name Dulse) and Porphyra (common name Sleabhac or Laver) species may potentially be used in the development of low-cost, highly nutritive diets that may compete with current protein crop sources such as soya bean. For example, the protein content of Dulse varies from between 9-25% depending on the season of collection and harvesting. The highest percentage protein per gram of dried whole seaweed is normally found in P. palmatacollected during the winter season (October — January). Valuable amino acids such as leucine, valine and methionine are well represented in Dulse. In Porphyra species, the amino acid profile is similar to those reported for leguminous plants such as peas or beans.

Health benefits of seaweed..

In addition to its use as a protein source, the researchers have found that some of these seaweed proteins may have health benefits beyond those of basic human nutrition — for use in functional foods.

Bioactive peptides are food-derived peptides that exert a physiological, ‘hormone-like’, beneficial health effect. Proteins and peptides from food sources such as dairy, eggs, meat and fish are well documented as agents capable of reducing high blood pressure and are thought to be able to prevent CVD…

 

 

 

 

October 15, 2012 Posted by | Nutrition | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

3 p.m. slump? Why a sugar rush may not be the answer

From the 17 November Eureka News Alert

Protein, not sugar, stimulates cells keeping us thin and awake, new study suggests

A new study has found that protein and not sugar activates the cells responsible for keeping us awake and burning calories. The research, published in the 17 November issue of the scientific journal Neuron, has implications for understanding obesity and sleep disorders.

Wakefulness and energy expenditure rely on “orexin cells”, which secrete a stimulant called orexin/hypocretin in the brain. Reduced activity in these unique cells results in narcolepsy and has been linked to weight gain.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge compared actions of different nutrients on orexin cells. They found that amino acids – nutrients found in proteins such as egg whites – stimulate orexin neurons much more than other nutrients….

…”To combat obesity and insomnia in today’s society, we need more information on how diet affects sleep and appetite cells. For now, research suggests that if you have a choice between jam on toast, or egg whites on toast, go for the latter! Even though the two may contain the same number of calories, having a bit of protein will tell the body to burn more calories out of those consumed.”

 

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November 17, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health, Medical and Health Research News, Nutrition | , , , , | Leave a comment

After Exercise Protein Drinks Help Maintain Aging Muscles

From the 26 May 2011 Medical News Today article

A new research report appearing online in the FASEB Journal shows that what someone drinks after exercise plays a critical role in maximizing the effects of exercise. Specifically, the report shows that protein drinks after aerobic activity increases the training effect after six weeks, when compared to carbohydrate drinks. Additionally, this study suggests that this effect can be seen using as little as 20 grams of protein. ….

Details: Matthew M. Robinson, Scott M. Turner, Marc K. Hellerstein, Karyn L. Hamilton, and Benjamin F. Miller. Long-term synthesis rates of skeletal muscle DNA and protein are higher during aerobic training in older humans than in sedentary young subjects but are not altered by protein supplementation. FASEB J; doi:10.1096/fj.11-186437.

For suggestions on how to get this article for free or at low cost, click here

May 26, 2011 Posted by | Consumer Health | , | Leave a comment

   

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