Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Press release] Why Scientists Are Blaming Cilia for Human Disease – Scientific American

Why Scientists Are Blaming Cilia for Human Disease – Scientific American.

Hairlike structures on cells may play a role in a host of genetic disorders, including kidney degeneration, vision impairment and even some cancers

Hairlike cilia may be at the roots of of several genetic disorders.
Image Courtesy of StudyBlue.com

Scientists now believe that a number of genetic disorders, from polycystic kidney disease to some forms of retinal degeneration, can ultimately be traced back to cilia—bristly, hairlike structures that dot cell surfaces.

In a review article published in the December 1 BioScience, George B. Witman, a cellular biologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, highlighted the growing body of evidence that abnormal or absent cilia can cause a wide range of human disorders, dubbed “ciliopathies.”

“Kidney disease and blindness, multiple digits, shortened bones or extremities, obesity—all of these things, it turns out, are due to defects in cilia,” he says. Experts add that the discovery of a common thread between these disparate disorders may eventually help researchers develop gene-based therapies to combat those conditions.

At first blush, cilia seem relatively innocuous. As they beat back and forth outside the cell, coordinated brushes of so-called motile cilia regulate fluid flow nearby. But almost all human cells also have one primary, or nonmotile, cilium that functions more like a molecular antenna. The primary cilium is an internally dynamic structure, packed with proteins that detect and convey important messages to its cell about the local environment. “The signaling machinery is concentrated in the cilia,” Witman says. “All in this very tightly controlled, constrained space.”

December 12, 2014 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Re-post] Opting-Out Of Vaccines; Dipping Below Herd Immunity

From the post at Boston Public Radio

With more and more families opting out of vaccinating their kids, one of the most sacred of public health goals, the concept of herd immunity, is being threatened.

A recent piece in Scientific American featured tantalizing graphics — on view above — illustrating this scary trend.  According to this analysis, the vaccination rates in some states — Oregon, West Virginia and Colorado, for instance, are shockingly low. So low, in fact, that they’ve dropped below the “herd immunity” levels (or what is thought to be the safe threshold) for MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and DTP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis).

So what’s the deal with herd immunity?  According to the CDC, a population has reached herd immunity when a sufficient proportion is immune to a particular infectious disease.  Immune population members get that protection either by being vaccinated or by having a prior infection.

 Read the entire post here

 

August 28, 2013 Posted by | Health Statistics, Public Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Forgetting is Key to a Healthy Mind

From the Scientific American Preview

Solomon Shereshevsky could recite entire speeches, word for word, after hearing them once. In minutes, he memorized complex math formulas, passages in foreign languages and tables consisting of 50 numbers or nonsense syllables. The traces of these sequences were so durably etched in his brain that he could reproduce them years later, according to Russian psychologist Alexander R. Luria, who wrote about the man he called, simply, “S” in The Mind of a Mnemonist.

 

Want to read the rest of the article? Check your local academic or public library.

It just might be available online through the library’s Web pages

December 30, 2011 Posted by | Psychology | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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