Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Dalai Lama: On Science and Emotional Health

 

Tenzin Gyatso, the fourteenth and current Dala...

Tenzin Gyatso, the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama, is the leader of the exiled Tibetan government in India. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. Photographed during his visit in Cologno Monzese MI, Italy, on december 8th, 2007. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dalai Lama: On Science and Emotional Health.

Excerpt

The Dalai Lama, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and exiled spiritual leader of Buddhism in Tibet, discussed his admiration for scientists and made some interesting remarks about emotional health during a recent speech at the National Institutes of Health.

The Dalai Lama was effusive in his praise for scientists. He said (and we quote): ‘I deeply admire my scientific friends’ (end of quote). The Dalai Lama pinpointed the open minded of scientists and what he described as a healthy skepticism about evidence and hyperbole. He also emphasized the capacity of scientists from around the world to work together and ignore differences in geography, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and social class.

The Dalai Lama noted these traits set scientists apart and provided an international, professional role model.

However, the Dalai Lama also said he found some scientists were unhappy despite their gifts and intelligence. He briefly discussed the lack of inner peace among scientists with a sense of humor rather than admonishment. The Dalai Lama’s infectious laugh and self-deprecating humor delighted many NIH staff members who packed an auditorium to hear him.

The Dalia Lama’s discussion about emotional inner peace led to broader remarks about the impact of maternal affection in the life long health of children. The Dalai Lama explained he was pleased that scientific evidence seemed consistent with his personal, long-standing observation of the vital role of maternal love and sincerity in the development of a child’s brain and emotional health.

Similarly, the Dalai Lama noted that he had long observed a perceived link between maternal affection, attention, and sincerity for their children and the development of life long compassion for others. He encouraged behavioral and other scientists to further assess the extent of this relationship.

The Dalai Lama also was moved by a series of drawings from young patients at NIH’s Children’s Inn and underscored his appreciation for the artists. Similarly, he praised a project he saw at NIH’s Clinical Center that seeks to restore the ability to walk for young persons with Cerebral Palsy.

In response to a question from NIH Director Francis Collins M.D., the Dalai Lama confessed he sometimes gets frustrated and irritated – and even occasionally loses his temper. For example, he explained he became angry once during an interview when a New York Times columnist asked him four times to describe his probable legacy. Although the Dalai Lama noted he believed he answered the question the first time, the story revealed even renowned spiritual leaders sometimes can get cross. It also deftly reminded the audience there always is room for improvement in how we manage our lives and work.

Enhanced by Zemanta

March 26, 2014 Posted by | Health News Items, Psychology | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

[PDF Document] The Nature of Science and the Scientific Method

The Geological Society of America has recently published an eight page document explaining in some detail the five steps of the scientific method and an overview of what science is capable of.

While it seems to be a discussion aid in the evolution/intelligent design debate, it is a useful tool for any branch of science including medicine. The talking point section is a great summary.

The document entitled The Nature of Science and the Scientific Method may be found here.

 

April 16, 2012 Posted by | Educational Resources (High School/Early College(, Health Education (General Public) | , | Leave a comment

Do Scientists Understand the Public?

Do Scientists Understand the Public?

N C C A M: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Science and political journalist Chris Mooney recently spoke at NCCAM’s Integrative Medicine Research Lecture.***

He shared his perspective on how scientists engage the public and thoughts on how to improve mutual understanding. The Integrative Medicine Research Lecture series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary and alternative medicine practices and approaches, and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine.
http://nccam.nih.gov/research/consultservice/lecture.htm?nav=upd

 

***The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCAAM)  Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary and alternative medicine practices and approaches, and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine.

Lectures are held at 10:00 a.m. in the NIH Clinical Research Center (Building 10) and are open to the public. Lectures are videocast at videocast.nih.gov.

January 25, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 166 other followers

%d bloggers like this: