Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Domestic Violence and Social Media (from the Health Is Social Blog)

Something to consider, if you tweet today, or connect to someone via another social media tool (as Facebook)…
remember there are people who fear to connect because they are being stalked by people with controlling intentions…

From the 8 November 2010 Health Is Social Blog item Domestic Violence and Social Media

Note: If you are a victim of domestic violence, please be sure you are safe accessing the Internet. If you have an emergency, dial 911 or the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE(7233). To leave this site immediately, click here.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN A DIGITALLY CONNECTED WORLD

This blog is dedicated, among other things, to exploring the intersection of health and social media. It swings its angle around different perspectives: from marketing to professional awareness of technology to the healthcare implications of the very existence of social media in our lives.

So I’m going to use this platform to talk about and raise questions about domestic violence in a world that is increasingly being overtaken by social media….

You see, not everybody is in exactly the same position as everyone else when it comes to social media – its use and its access.

A newly diagnosed cancer patient is in an entirely different situation from a woman whose husband or boyfriend abuses her. The former doesn’t have to worry about a husband who stalks her every move; implants spyware on her computer; and threatens to kill her if she tells anybody else what’s going on.

A tweet, or a check-in, could be as effectively dangerous as a bullet.

Violence isn’t just a physical act: its a violation, one which ranges from subtle manipulation to implicit threatening and emotional terrorizing to murder.

And therein lies the peculiar challenges of domestic violence and social media. If social media is – as is claimed – Social, then there are specific social ramifications to be considered in the context of domestic violence.

On one hand, victims of domestic violence need support and resources and the information needed to acquire them.

On the other, abusers often go to any length to control their victims. Their insecurity with themselves is so deep – so out of their own control – that they seek control and security in the emotional and visceral pain of others.

So what does a victim do when the abuser dominates so much that social media isn’t much of a safe option?…..

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February 22, 2012 Posted by | Consumer Safety | , , , | Leave a comment

National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)

NISVS report cover

 

From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site

On average, 24 people per minute are victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States, based on a survey conducted in 2010. Over the course of a year, that equals more than 12 million women and men. Those numbers only tell part of the story—more than 1 million women are raped in a year and over 6 million women and men are victims of stalking in a year. These findings emphasize that sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence are important and widespread public health problems in the United States.

Sexual Violence Victimization

Graph showing the age at time of first completed rape victimization in lifetime among females, NISVS 2010More than three-quarters of female victims of completed rape (79.6%) were first raped before their 25th birthday, with 42.2% experiencing their first completed rape before the age of 18 (29.9% between 11–17 years old and 12.3% at or before age 10) (Figure 2.2).

More than one-quarter of male victims of completed rape (27.8%) were first raped when they were 10 years old or younger (data not shown).

December 27, 2011 Posted by | Public Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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