Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reposte Food fights back: London researchers tap yogurt as toxin defender | Metro

Biggest concern for me is what happens to the toxins after they leave one’s body? How do they impact our environment???

English: Nonfat Yogurt

English: Nonfat Yogurt (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Food fights back: London researchers tap yogurt as toxin defender | Metro.

From the 8 October article

f you want to defend yourself against poison, eat yogurt.

That’s the – simplified – idea behind research published by experts in London.

A study led by scientists at Lawson Health Research Institute showed that probiotic yogurt can reduce the absorption of certain heavy metals and environmental toxins by as much as 78 per cent in pregnant women. They have said it’s the first clinical evidence that yogurt can cut the health risks of mercury and arsenic.

But don’t race to the grocery store just yet. This is a scientific study, so its results don’t suggest a miracle cure. Also, it was a specific type of yogurt, with specific bacteria, so it’s not so easy to find on the shelves.

“It’s not something you can take as a preventative measure,” Bisanz, the first author on the paper.

He warned that acute poisoning would mean different, more conventional treatments. But these findings about yogurt are exciting, the researchers said, and a “starting point” for further research about foodstuffs as a defence against environmental toxins. It could have a “massive” impact on the quality of life for many people, Bisanz added.

“When we try and get funding for this kind of stuff, it’s difficult because people think it’s farcical, or it’s too simple, or it’s Africa; it’s not here,” Reid said. “We kind of go out on a limb to say, ‘Let’s do the study and not worry so much about how to do it,’ but then you get the results back and you think, ‘This is cool’.”

Next up is more study into more strains of bacteria, the scientists said. Other types could block other toxins, and Bisanz is spearheading more research.

October 16, 2014 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Reblog]The rich really are different: Their bodies contain unique chemical pollutants

Disparity of rich and poor in Rio de Janeiro

Disparity of rich and poor in Rio de Janeiro (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From the 5 August 2013 article at Quartz by Christopher Mims

“Tell me what kinds of toxins are in your body, and I’ll tell you how much you’re worth,” could be the new motto of doctors everywhere. In a finding that surprised even the researchers conducting the study, it turns out that both rich and poor Americans are walking toxic waste dumps for chemicals like mercury, arsenic, lead, cadmium and bisphenol A, which could be a cause of infertility. And while a buildup of environmental toxins in the body afflicts rich and poor alike, the type of toxin varies by wealth.

America’s rich are harboring chemicals associated with what are normally considered healthy lifestyles

People who can afford sushi and other sources of aquatic lean protein appear to be paying the price with a buildup of heavy metals in their bodies, found Jessica Tyrrell and colleagues from the University of Exeter. Using data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Tyrrell et al. found that compared to poorer people, the rich had higher levels of mercury, arsenic, caesium and thallium, all of which tend to accumulate in fish and shellfish.

The rich also had higher levels of benzophenone-3, aka oxybenzone, the active ingredient in most sunscreens, which is under investigation by the EU and, argue some experts, may actually encourage skin cancer.

America’s poor have toxins associated with exposure to plastics and cigarette smoke

Higher rates of cigarette smoking among those of lower means seem to be associated with higher levels of lead and cadmium. Poor people in America also had higher levels of Bisphenol-A, a substance used to line cans and other food containers, and which is banned in the EU, Malaysia, South Africa, China and, in the US, in baby bottles.

Previous research has established that rich Americans are more likely to eat their fruits and vegetables and less likely to eat “energy-dense” fast food and snacks, but this work establishes that in some ways, in moving up the economic ladder Americans are simply trading one set of environmental toxins for another.

August 5, 2013 Posted by | Consumer Health, Nutrition | , , | Leave a comment

Effects of environmental toxicants reach down through generations

Effects of environmental toxicants reach down through generations

From the 2 March 2012 article at Science News Daily

 Washington State University researcher has demonstrated that a variety of environmental toxicants can have negative effects on not just an exposed animal but the next three generations of its offspring.

English: Environmental contamination with pest...

Image via Wikipedia

The animal’s DNA sequence remains unchanged, but the compounds change the way genes turn on and off — the epigenetic effect studied at length by WSU molecular biologist Michael Skinner and expanded on in the current issue of the online journalPLoS ONE.

While Skinner’s earlier research has shown similar effects from a pesticide and fungicide, this is the first to show a greater variety of toxicants — including jet fuel, dioxin, plastics and the pesticides DEET and permethrin — promoting epigenetic disease across generations…

The field opens new ground in the study of how diseases develop. While toxicologists generally focus on animals exposed to a compound, Skinner’s work further demonstrates that diseases can also stem from older, ancestral exposures that are then mediated through epigenetic changes in sperm.

The study was funded by the U.S. Army to study pollutants that troops might be exposed to. Skinner and his colleagues exposed pregnant female rats to relatively high but non-lethal amounts of the compounds and tracked changes in three generations of offspring.

The researchers saw females reaching puberty earlier, increased rates in the decay and death of sperm cells and lower numbers of ovarian follicles that later become eggs. Future studies can use the molecular tools for risk assessment analysis

March 5, 2012 Posted by | Public Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sunlight can influence the breakdown of medicines in the body

Sunlight can influence the breakdown of medicines in the body

The body’s ability to break down medicines may be closely related to exposure to sunlight, new research suggests. (Credit: iStockphoto/Michiel De Boer)

From the March 9 Science Daily item

ScienceDaily (Mar. 9, 2011) — A study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet has shown that the body’s ability to break down medicines may be closely related to exposure to sunlight, and thus may vary with the seasons. The findings offer a completely new model to explain individual differences in the effects of drugs, and how the surroundings can influence the body’s ability to deal with toxins.

The study will be published in the scientific journal Drug Metabolism & Disposition and is based on nearly 70,000 analyses from patients who have undergone regular monitoring of the levels of drugs in their blood.

 

 

March 10, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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