Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

Smoking Marijuana Associated With Higher Stroke Risk in Young Adults

Cannabis and pipe

Cannabis and pipe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

From the 6 February 2013 article at Science Daily

 

Marijuana, the most widely used illicit drug, may double stroke risk in young adults, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013.

In a New Zealand study, ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients were 2.3 times more likely to have cannabis, also known as marijuana, detected in urine tests as other age and sex matched patients, researchers said.

“This is the first case-controlled study to show a possible link to the increased risk of stroke from cannabis,” said P. Alan Barber, Ph.D., M.D., study lead investigator and professor of clinical neurology at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. “Cannabis has been thought by the public to be a relatively safe, although illegal substance. This study shows this might not be the case; it may lead to stroke.”

In previous case reports, ischemic stroke and TIAs developed hours after cannabis use, Barber said. “These patients usually had no other vascular risk factors apart from tobacco, alcohol and other drug usage.”

It’s challenging to perform prospective studies involving illegal substances such as cannabis because “questioning stroke and control patients about cannabis use is likely to obtain unreliable responses,” Barber said.

In the study, the regional ethics committee allowed researchers to use urine samples from other hospitalized patients. But researchers knew only the age, sex and ethnicity for matching due to a lack of consent.

The study provides the strongest evidence to date of an association between cannabis and stroke, Barber said. But the association is confounded because all but one of the stroke patients who were cannabis users also used tobacco regularly.

“We believe it is the cannabis and not tobacco,” said Barber, who hopes to conduct another study to determine whether there’s an association between cannabis and stroke independent of tobacco use. “This may prove difficult given the risks of bias and ethical strictures of studying the use of an illegal substance,” he said. “However, the high prevalence of cannabis use in this cohort of younger stroke patients makes this research imperative.”

Physicians should test young people who come in with stroke for cannabis use, Barber said.

“People need to think twice about using cannabis,” because it can affect brain development and result in emphysema, heart attack and now stroke, he said….

 

Read the entire article here

 

 

February 8, 2013 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News | , , , | 1 Comment

[Great article critique] Eating Egg Yolks as Bad as Smoking?

 

From the 14 August 2012 article at Understanding Nutrition

This article refers to the article and paper below:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120813155640.htm
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021915012005047

egg yolksOn August 13, 2012, ScienceDaily.com published an article entitled, “Eating Egg Yolks as Bad as Smoking?” ScienceDaily.com concludes “eating egg yolks accelerates atherosclerosis in a manner similar to smoking cigarettes.”

Unfortunately, ScienceDaily.com and many other news networks fail to accurately describe the details and outcomes of the study. Here, I carefully examine the study and suggest an alternative conclusion from the data.

First, it is important to look at the participants of the study. The data was collected from individuals soon after they had a stroke or transient ischeamic attack (known as a “mini stroke”). This study is not examining healthy individuals or comparing the number of strokes in people who ate lots of eggs vs. those who ate few eggs. All participants in the study already had a stroke regardless of their egg consumption….

 

 

 

August 22, 2012 Posted by | Medical and Health Research News, Nutrition | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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