Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

[Reblog] My Health Data Is Killing Me | The Health Care Blog

My Health Data Is Killing Me | The Health Care Blog.

Excerpt from the 20 January post

AppleHealth

We are still in the dark ages when it comes to health and fitness data. It reminds me of the early 1990s when I had a paper day planner for a calendar, a business card holder for contacts, and a map.

Then along came the Microsoft Outlook and LotusNotes platform. These two platforms slugged it out like Uber verses Lyft. Then Microsoft integrated MS Office with MS Outlook and it was “game over.” I finally had one place to find everything I needed to do 90% of my job.

I’m waiting for that moment to come to the realm of my fitness data. It’s extremely difficult for me to access my medical and fitness data as it is, and yet the recent CES conference presented hundreds of new ways to collect more of my data. There will be wearables, scales, patches, contact lenses, smartphones, watches, etc. Maybe even a drone to fly overhead and watch what I eat for lunch. It is overwhelming. How overwhelming, you ask?

Read the rest of the article here

January 21, 2015 Posted by | Consumer Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Reblog] WEARABLE HEALTH TECH ALONE NOT ENOUGH TO GET TANGIBLE RESULTS

From the 12 January 2015 item at Public Health View

Wearable devices targeted at healthy living are alone not enough to drive tangible changes in an individual’s health, experts say, although sales of these devices are expected to soar in the coming years.

Courtesy: Garmin

Companies like Apple and Google sell watches and cellphones that can track health-related statistics, and others like Fitbit and Garmin make wristbands and even necklaces geared towards recording health-related statistics. This, in turn, is expected to translate into improved health behavior and hence better health outcomes.

But it is not that simple, say experts.

“The gap between recording information and changing behavior is substantial, and while these devices are increasing in popularity, little evidence suggests that they are bridging the gap,” experts wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
….

January 20, 2015 Posted by | Consumer Health, Medical and Health Research News | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

[Reblog] Tech Innovations in Healthcare | HealthWorks Collective

Tech Innovations in Healthcare | HealthWorks Collective.

From the 6 November 2014 post

As technology continually expands with each passing year so do the industries it affects. This year the world has been witness to everything from wearable technology like Fitbit Google Glass to 3D printing, both of which are prime examples of tech and healthcare melding.

The healthcare industry has been no stranger to advancements in technology. These medical marvels are changing the way people are impacted and thereby changing the face of the healthcare industry.

1. Mobile Apps

2. Telehealth

google glass3. Google Glass

4. 3D Printing

5. Optogenetics

 

6. Digestible Sensors

 

 

November 25, 2014 Posted by | Health News Items | , , | Leave a comment

The first medical paper about Google Glass.

From the abstract at Springer Link

Graduate medical education (GME) is a balance between providing optimal patient care while ensuring that trainees (residents and fellows) develop independent medical decision making skills as well asand the ability to manage serious medical conditions. We used one form of wearable technology (“Google Glass”) to explore different scenarios in cardiovascular practice where fellows can better their education. We specified different scenarios encountered during routine clinical care in the month of July 2013. These scenarios were chosen based on their clinical significance, the difficulty posed to early stage trainees and the possibly deleterious effects of misdiagnosis or treatment. A mock trainee wearing Google glass enacted each scenario. Live video stream from the glass was transmitted via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth which could have been received by a smartphone, tablet or personal computer. In conclusion, wearable technology has the potential to enhance medical education and patient safety once widely available. Medical institutions should work on policies regarding the use of such technologies to enhance medical care without compromising patient privacy.

 

October 18, 2013 Posted by | Educational Resources (Health Professionals) | , , | Leave a comment

   

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