Health and Medical News and Resources

General interest items edited by Janice Flahiff

No evidence that vaccines cause microcephaly in babies (and other Zika rumors dispelled)

From the 11 March WHO news release

Excerpts

There is no specific repellent that works better against the Aedes mosquito

There are many repellents that are effective against all mosquitoes including Aedes mosquitos. Effective repellents contain DEET (diethyltoluamide) or IR 3535 or Icaridin which are the most common biologically active ingredients in insect repellents. Active ingredients are listed on the product label. The following active ingredients repel or kill the mosquito when it rests or approaches the body: DEET (N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide), IR3535 (3- [N-butyl-N-acetyl], aminopropionic acid ethyl-ester) or Icaridin (piperidinecarboxílico acid-1, 2- (2-hydroxyethyl) – 1-metilpropilester).

There is no minimum or maximum percentage of active ingredient required. Insect repellents may be applied to exposed skin to protect against the bites of mosquitoes or on the clothes. WHO recommends covering the skin with clothing as much as possible and using insect repellents as effective measures to protect against bites from mosquitoes that transmit viruses such as chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever and Zika.

Repellents must be used in strict accordance with the label instructions. There is no evidence of any restriction of the use of these repellents by pregnant women if they are used in accordance with the instructions on the product label.

No evidence that vaccines cause microcephaly in babies

There is no evidence linking any vaccine to the increases in microcephaly cases that were observed first in French Polynesia during the 2013-2014 outbreak and more recently in northeastern Brazil.

An extensive review of the literature published in 2014 found no evidence that any vaccine administered during pregnancy resulted in birth defects.

No evidence that pyriproxyfen insecticide causes microcephaly

A team of WHO scientists recently reviewed data on the toxicology of pyriproxyfen, one of 12 larvicides that WHO recommends to reduce mosquito populations. It found no evidence that the larvicide affects the course of pregnancy or the development of a fetus. The US Environmental Protection Agency and EU investigators reached a similar conclusion when they carried out a separate review of the product.

No evidence that the Zika outbreak and unusual increase in microcephaly cases in Brazil is linked to recent releases of genetically modified mosquitoes in Brazil

No evidence that sterilized male mosquitoes contribute to the spread of Zika

Bacteria used to control the male mosquito population are not spreading Zika further

Fish can help stop Zika.

Some countries affected by Zika and dengue are using biological methods as part of an integrated approach to mosquito control. El Salvador, for example, with strong support from fishing communities, is introducing larvae-devouring fish into water storage containers.

Advertisements

March 12, 2016 Posted by | Public Health | | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: